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Building a Computer, need help!?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
I wanna build a pretty good computer(my first time building it). Even though i havn't ever built a computer before, i'm somewhat familiar with them.

I decided on all the parts i want to buy already, here they are:

AMD Phenom ii x4 955 Deneb Black Edition @ 3.2 GHz
G Skill RipJawz 8 gb DDR3 @ 1333MHz
MSI 880gm-E43
ATI Radeon Sapphire HD 6790 1 GB GDDR5
Diablotek 575w
Rosewill Challenger Case

The Only problem i have is the Hard Drive. I honestly thought Hard Drives were cheaper than they are. I have a price range of about 600$, i can go to 650$ but i really don't want to. (PS I'm only 16 and building it on my own money)

I had made a decision that i would get a 160GB HD priced at 85$

However, i was wondering. Could i use the Hard Drive in my current pc. It's only 80 GB but i have an extrenal hard drive thats 120 GB.

Would the 80 GB be a problem considering it's very small? I plan on saving everything on my external hard drive(music, videos, etc) except programs and whatnot.

What do you guys think about that idea?

Also, are all hard drives the same size(width, length, height)?

Same for the DVD-RW... Could i take the one in my current pc and add it to the new one? Are all the sizes the same?
post #2 of 8
Currently there is flooding where HDDs are manufactured, that accounts for the inflated prices of HDDs right now. I would recommend you hold off on purchasing a new one until Q1/Q2 2012 until the manufacturers get caught up.

Yes, you can use your old HDD in your new system, it may slow the system down a bit, in fact I can guarantee it will be the bottleneck, but not too big a deal. Just make sure it is a sata compatible HDD and you are good to go. Even if it is IDE there are cheap converters you can pick up to tide you over.

Now onto your system, there are a couple issues I see. Mainly with your gpu and the psu. Let's start with your psu, Diablotek isn't a great manufacturer, I am not familiar with that particular model but I know that many of their units have some significant issues. Not producing the rated wattage, not at good efficiency, shut downs, blow outs, etc. The last thing you want to do is throw in a cheap psu and it blows up your system, or has constant blue screens. I would recommend getting an antec, corsair, xfx, or other seasonic re-branded psus.
As for your gpu, do you mean a 6970? Because that is a good unit, otherwise I would just throw in a 6870, great bang for your buck card.
2500k
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CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
2500k @ 4.6 1.27V Asus p67 Pro SLI 560 TI Ripjaws X 1600 2x4GB 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Crucial C300 + Spinpoint F3 Noctua N-D14 Win 7 x64 LG 1920x1080 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Das Professional NZXT 750w Hale90 Antec 600 M60 
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ATH AD700 
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2500k
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
2500k @ 4.6 1.27V Asus p67 Pro SLI 560 TI Ripjaws X 1600 2x4GB 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Crucial C300 + Spinpoint F3 Noctua N-D14 Win 7 x64 LG 1920x1080 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Das Professional NZXT 750w Hale90 Antec 600 M60 
Audio
ATH AD700 
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post #3 of 8
Change the above to the following

Intel Core i3 2120
any ASUS H67 mobo

PSU: Seasonic 500~600W should be more than enough.

As for HDD if your 80GB HDD is not IDE then there shouldnt be much of an issue. Keep your HDD purchase on hold as the prices for HDD's have gone beyond the roof.

BTW, It has to be a Desktop HDD not a laptop HDD as the latter is smaller & slimmer.

Same goes for the existing DVD-RW drive.
Bat Computer v2
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Intel Core i3 2100 P8H67-V Radeon HD 4670 Corsair  
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
Intel SSD 320 Series Lite-On DVD ROM Windows 8.1 Professional x64 Dell S2240L 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
TVS Gold Mechanical Rocketfish RF-900WPS Lancool PC-K62B Gigabyte GM-M6800 
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Surface Optical Mouse Pad 
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Bat Computer v2
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i3 2100 P8H67-V Radeon HD 4670 Corsair  
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
Intel SSD 320 Series Lite-On DVD ROM Windows 8.1 Professional x64 Dell S2240L 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
TVS Gold Mechanical Rocketfish RF-900WPS Lancool PC-K62B Gigabyte GM-M6800 
Mouse Pad
Surface Optical Mouse Pad 
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post #4 of 8
Get a good reliable 500W PSU and it will run that stuff fine.
960T is cheaper, and unlockable to a X6 and/or can overclock great and consume less power than a 955 would.
Get a 6770 and then with that money you save buy a better motherboard.
post #5 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3dand View Post
Also, are all hard drives the same size(width, length, height)?

Same for the DVD-RW... Could i take the one in my current pc and add it to the new one? Are all the sizes the same?
So your other questions have been answered, ill try answer these ;P.

there are a few types of hard drives, most of them are either 1.8" (For very small devices such as netbooks and smaller, usually SSD (solid state disk), 2.5" (most common in laptops and standard size for SSDs) and 3.5" (standard desktop size).

The DVD drives are usually 5" if im not mistaken, correct me if Im wrong.

EDIT: DVD drives are 5.25" as standard

You can easily (usually) get a 1 tb HDD for around $55, but unfortunately there was flooding in some factories in Thailand i believe? Which has caused supply/demand to stuff up and prices to skyrocket
post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by harishgayatri View Post

BTW, It has to be a Desktop HDD not a laptop HDD as the latter is smaller & slimmer.

Same goes for the existing DVD-RW drive.
It doesn't HAVE to be, it just wont fit normally in your case. Actually it will, the Rosewill Challenger comes with a 2.5" to 3.5" adapter.

For a 6790 all you need is a quality 400w PSU. I would get this 500 watt for some headroom if you want to upgrade http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...thwatts%20500w
Edited by TheYonderGod - 11/4/11 at 8:46pm
My rig
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AMD Turion TL-60 x2 2Ghz Acer Aspire 5517 Radeon HD 3200 4GB DDR2 800 Mhz 
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My rig
(17 items)
 
   
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AMD Turion TL-60 x2 2Ghz Acer Aspire 5517 Radeon HD 3200 4GB DDR2 800 Mhz 
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64GB Kingston SSD Windows 7 
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post #7 of 8
hard drives are expensive because several manufacturing plants have been closed due to flooding in thailand. otherwise your system looks fine, but maybe consider getting a 990x board in case you want to upgrade to a bulldozer cpu in the future? also consider getting a beefier PSU in case you want a more powerful graphics card, too, or crossfire.
post #8 of 8
Don't go cheap on the PSU. Get the best you can afford. It is common for the cheaper ones to fail quickly, and many are actually fire hazards. Those cheap ones made in china that often ship with budget prebuilt systems are not even worth serving as a paperweight. Not only that, a faulty power supply could end up damaging your hardware.

Also, with your graphics card, there are other things to consider besides the amount of RAM contained on the card. The number of shader cores (stream processors) and the memory interface (64, 128, 256 bit) can make a big difference. Some budget cards can have fewer than 10 stream processors. The 6790 has 800 stream processors. For $35 more dollars, you can get a Radeon 6870 with 1120 stream processors and 60MHz faster engine clock speed.

Again, however, you are looking at a beefy PSU if you want a nice graphics card. You don't want your system gasping for power.

As far as hard drives are concerned, there are two main types: laptop and desktop. All desktop hard drives are the same dimensions. A laptop hard drive can be used with a mount kit. You can even mount a hard drive in an empty 5.25'' bay (usually reserved for a CD drive) with some mounting kits or a hard drive bay. However, there are many different hard drive interfaces (affecting the type of connection and the cables used). SATA is the most widely used type. IDE was the older ribbon type. Most motherboards have IDE interfaces and SATA interfaces. If you don't have a SATA interface, you can buy a SATA interface card that plugs into a free PCI slot. Also, if you have an external drive, you should note that USB2 is not nearly as fast as a native IDE or SATA interface. The newer external drives are E-SATA (externally adaptable SATA interface).
Edited by spliff - 11/4/11 at 10:37pm
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