Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Mice › Razer Lachesis Review (Gen 1)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Razer Lachesis Review (Gen 1)

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 
Hey guys,

Recently did a review of my Lachesis (Gen 1), and thought I would post it here too. Enjoy writing but didn't really have a newer mouse to review so I figured I would do one on this.

razer-lachesis-mb.jpg

Razer Lachesis Review

091120111876.jpg

Around 3 years ago I was looking for a decent but cheap gaming mouse. My friend sold me his brand new Razer Lachesis for a song, and it offered me more than any new mouse, so I went for it.

The Razer Lachesis boasts a number of features that help it stand out from the many other gaming mice that populate the market. It uses Razer’s 3G laser sensor and packs a maximum DPI of 4000. Throw in 9 programmable buttons as well as 1000Hz ultrapolling, to ensure there is no input lag, and you have a the makings of a great mouse. On the aesthetic side, the scroll wheel and Razer logo light up blue, and the Razer logo pulsates slowly.
I was used to ergonomic mice, so adjusting to an ambidextrous mouse took some time. However the high arch and wide front, and long size suited my large hands well, and I got used to it fairly quickly. The mouse is suited to both palm grips and claw grips, however I found after using the mouse for some time that my grip changed from a palm grip more of a claw grip as I found this to be more suited to gaming (more details on this further on).

091120111878.jpg
Palm Grip

091120111879.jpg
Claw Grip

One complaint that many users have is that the glossy sides on Razer mice pick up fingerprints very easily and can get very grimy after an intense gaming session. Both these points are true, but one counter point is that the side buttons are rubberized, so the difference in the two textures may make it easier to feel and hit the button in the heat of the battle. On the topic of buttons, all the buttons feel solid when pressed and have a nice click.

091120111880.jpg
Side Buttons

All 9 of the buttons can be programmed using Razer’s configuration software. This allows users to choose what each button does. This includes assigning a profile (for those who use multiple profiles for different games), DPI up, DPI down, or even assign a specific DPI (1700 for example). Another option is to assign a key or key combo to a button. The DPI ranges from 125 to 400 and increases in intervals of 125, any of which can be chosen. This provides a huge amount of flexibility in configuring the mouse to suit your needs. It also lets you choose the polling rate and controls the lighting of the scroll wheel and Razer logo. All in all this works well, giving you everything needed to tame the beast.

razerconfig.png
Razer Config Program

There are a number of features that make this mouse well suited for FPS games. The 9 buttons alone almost make it a no brainer. They allow many useful in-game functions to be mapped to the mouse for instant access. My usual setting for FPS games is to assign the left side buttons melee/knife and crouch, while the buttons just below the scroll wheel are for alt. grenade and prone (if needed). The right side buttons are harder to hit in-game but it is useful to have 2 sensitivities, one for sniping and one that is used generally. Another useful feature that is often overlooked is how the shape itself helps. Both sides are indented, making it easier to pick up and hold the mouse (especially when claw gripping, as mentioned above). This is essential for quick turns to get those creeping up on you from behind.

091120111883.jpg
Side indentations

While a mouse alone cannot improve a gamer’s skill, which is something that requires practice, the features provided by a mouse like the Lachesis help improve a user’s game and reach higher levels more quickly. Razer has now released a refresh of the Lachesis of the Lachesis packing a brand new 3.5G sensor with 5600 DPI. It also has a braided cord, and both the scroll wheel and Razer logo have multi-color lighting that can be changed to what the user desires. In conclusion, the Razer Lachesis is a great mouse with many features that would be a great addition to any gamer’s arsenal. I have no problems recommending it, and would buy it again at full retail. I only hope that the refresh is as good as if not better than the original that I own.

091120111881.jpg
Bottom
091120111874.jpg

Thanks for reading and let me know what you think
Apologies for some the more blurry pics, phone's macro mode isn't good enough, will try to update with some better ones soon.
Acer Aspire 5930G
(13 items)
 
  
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
P8400 2.26Ghz @ 0.97v 9600M GT DDR3 @ 620/910/1550 4GB DDR2 250GB Hitachi 5.4k 
OSMonitorMouseMouse Pad
Windows 7 x64 15.4" WXGA [Crap panel -_- ] Razer Lachesis Razer Goliathus Eco 
  hide details  
Reply
Acer Aspire 5930G
(13 items)
 
  
CPUGraphicsRAMHard Drive
P8400 2.26Ghz @ 0.97v 9600M GT DDR3 @ 620/910/1550 4GB DDR2 250GB Hitachi 5.4k 
OSMonitorMouseMouse Pad
Windows 7 x64 15.4" WXGA [Crap panel -_- ] Razer Lachesis Razer Goliathus Eco 
  hide details  
Reply
post #2 of 4
I have one of these in a box collecting dust somewhere. I liked the overall shape of the mouse, but its fail sensor with the z-axis issue and hard to press side buttons made it a dud for me. If it had the DA sensor and side button switches, I think it would've been a pretty amazing mouse.
post #3 of 4
My friend has a Lachesis and the way he uses the mouse is very funny. He uses very high DPI or high sensitivity because he thinks that he can avoid any issue on this mouse by doing that ha ha ha.

Maybe it's true because at high DPI or sensitivity you usually do not need to lift the mouse.
post #4 of 4
Nice write up bud. thumb.gif
     
  hide details  
Reply
     
  hide details  
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Mice
Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Mice › Razer Lachesis Review (Gen 1)