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Diagnosing a dead monitor

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
I've seen several tutorials around youtube and a few on here regarding fixing a monitor, but I'm not exactly sure which one will help me as I'm not sure what is wrong with it redface.gif Basically, the 2 types of fixes I've seen are replacing bad capacitors or replacing a dead cathode tube. The problem with my monitor is that it turns on and displays everything for a few seconds then goes dark. The blue standby light is still on, and if I hold a flashlight to the screen I can still see that it is displaying, there's just no backlight. So this led me to believe the cathode is dead, but again I've never fixed a monitor so it could maybe still be a capacitor, I have no idea. Any way I can easily tell which is the problem?
post #2 of 7
I would say that opening would be the best way to tell what is wrong. I have a few troubleshooting steps in my tutorial stickied in the monitor section, there are a few pictures in there that might be of some help.

I would hate to jump to any conclusions until a better diagnosis is made.

edit: It's pretty hard to tell what any of the stickies are since the site change. I hope that gets tweeked a bit -_-
Edited by Fir3Chi3f - 11/10/11 at 8:36pm
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post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 
Well I don't see any leaking caps. Only thing that looks concerning is one that is slightly bulging on top, but it's so slight it's almost unnoticeable.

Here's a pic of the one I'm talking about, the biggest. Very slight bulge
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post #4 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by TrustKill View Post

Well I don't see any leaking caps. Only thing that looks concerning is one that is slightly bulging on top, but it's so slight it's almost unnoticeable.
Here's a pic of the one I'm talking about, the biggest. Very slight bulge
450

Could be enough to cause a problem though and Su'scon is black-listed on the Badcaps forums:
http://www.badcaps.net/forum/showpost.php?s=bcb530f912d8c5d563a575303f82c991&p=1685&postcount=3

We really could never know for sure if that is the issue without an ESR meter (What is used to check capacitors), but it is a good start. Unless someone else can chime in with a better idea, the best approach may be to replace all the Su'scon caps with something from this list:
http://www.badcaps.net/forum/showpost.php?p=1824&postcount=1

There are other "good" manufacturers, but these have proven their metal to the badcaps community. Anyway, let us know what you end up doing.
Edited by Fir3Chi3f - 11/10/11 at 10:29pm
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post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 
Ok, well thanks for the help thus far redface.gif I guess I'm gonna try replacing that one. Though I'm not too sure what I should buy, just the exact same type but by a different manufacturer?
post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by TrustKill View Post

Ok, well thanks for the help thus far redface.gif I guess I'm gonna try replacing that one. Though I'm not too sure what I should buy, just the exact same type but by a different manufacturer?

That is what most people do and what most tutorials say to do. I have a list of good places to buy from in my tutorial (I don't recommend ebay). With this 'quick and dirty' method you would just be matching voltage and micro Farad ratings. Which are printed on the side of the can.

What I would recommend is looking up ESR and Impudence ratings of the one you want to replace and compare that to capacitors from other manufacturers. I don't know what series that cap is (there should be letters or other markings to indicate that) but here is a an example of what you would be looking for:
http://www.su-scon.com.tw/readyscript/att.php?file=pdf/mg.pdf

The idea being, caps aren't used for 'capacitance' anymore necessarily. They are being used to sort of 'clean' the incoming power, removing whatever variances exist. And thusly, those are the ratings we should be interested in.

However you choose to go about it I'm fairly confident it would work.
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post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 
Well, first solder job and apparently it turned out ok because the monitor is alive again smile.gif I was a little concerned at first, looks a little sloppy I think redface.gif also, the desolder vacuum I was using slid across the board a few times from the force and it left a couple scratches. Was worried about that, but I guess it wasn't a big deal thankfully...

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