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UPS Recommendation. Please, please, please.

post #1 of 39
Thread Starter 
What is the best bang-for-the-buck UPS that I should use with my system? I read that it's always better to use UPS with a full sine wave output instead of those with square wave outputs, right? I really don't know what I'm looking for since this is the first time I will use one.

Help somebody frown.gif Thanks!
post #2 of 39
I've always had great success with APC 1500VA UPS models....

You can get them on sale for around $150... but you gotta look hard for that price.


http://www.apc.com/products/resource/include/techspec_index.cfm?base_sku=BR1500G&total_watts=200
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post #3 of 39
Thread Starter 
Do they output a full sine wave?
post #4 of 39
Honestly, I can't answer that question.... however just based on experience, I've never lost a piece of hardware that was behind one of those units.

And trust me, the cost of my components in my PC is probably about 10x the cost of that UPS. I compute when the weather outside is crazy... no problem. If the power goes out in the house, my system stays running for at least another 30 to 45 minutes giving me plenty of time to finish up whatever I need to do.

I also have my DSL modem connected as well... so that I don't lose power to my internet connection.

Generally APC is a trusted brand among home user UPS systems. (also there is Tripp Lite).

According to the information in the link I provided, it says that the waveform type is "Stepped approximation to a sinewave". Honestly that's all I know about it.
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post #5 of 39
Thread Starter 
Ok.

I need more information please frown.gif I still don't know which one to buy.

What do I need to look for? What specs?
post #6 of 39
I recently purchased a CyberPower UPS from Amazon. I chose the CyberPower CP1500PFCLCD because it provides closer to a true sine wave waveform than some of the cheaper ones do (cheaper power supplies have a modified square wave). In fact its so close to a real sine wave that they don't even differentiate it as being anything other than pure sine in their marketing.

The reason a true sine wave is important is because if you use some of the nicer PSUs these days that come with Active Power Factor Correction (your Seasonic and my Seasonic both have this feature), a cheaper UPS' modified square wave can at the worst mess your computer up and at the least not stay powered on in case of a power outage.

If you do end up getting a UPS, I'd recommend you get one with a true sine wave or one that can handle Power Factor Correction enabled PSUs. I really love the CyberPower one that I got -- not only does it work really well, but I think it looks really sleek and cool too.

Hope this was helpful!
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post #7 of 39
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GasMan320 View Post

I recently purchased a CyberPower UPS from Amazon. I chose the CyberPower CP1500PFCLCD because it provides closer to a true sine wave waveform than some of the cheaper ones do (cheaper power supplies have a modified square wave). In fact its so close to a real sine wave that they don't even differentiate it as being anything other than pure sine in their marketing.
The reason a true sine wave is important is because if you use some of the nicer PSUs these days that come with Active Power Factor Correction (your Seasonic and my Seasonic both have this feature), a cheaper UPS' modified square wave can at the worst mess your computer up and at the least not stay powered on in case of a power outage.
If you do end up getting a UPS, I'd recommend you get one with a true sine wave or one that can handle Power Factor Correction enabled PSUs. I really love the CyberPower one that I got -- not only does it work really well, but I think it looks really sleek and cool too.
Hope this was helpful!

Thanks.

Is that the only choice I have though?
post #8 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevindd992002 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by GasMan320 View Post

I recently purchased a CyberPower UPS from Amazon. I chose the CyberPower CP1500PFCLCD because it provides closer to a true sine wave waveform than some of the cheaper ones do (cheaper power supplies have a modified square wave). In fact its so close to a real sine wave that they don't even differentiate it as being anything other than pure sine in their marketing.
The reason a true sine wave is important is because if you use some of the nicer PSUs these days that come with Active Power Factor Correction (your Seasonic and my Seasonic both have this feature), a cheaper UPS' modified square wave can at the worst mess your computer up and at the least not stay powered on in case of a power outage.
If you do end up getting a UPS, I'd recommend you get one with a true sine wave or one that can handle Power Factor Correction enabled PSUs. I really love the CyberPower one that I got -- not only does it work really well, but I think it looks really sleek and cool too.
Hope this was helpful!

Thanks.

Is that the only choice I have though?

No, definitely not. If you want to go with APC, you can buy the APC BR1500G which is about the same price.

Since your power supply has an output of 660W you want to go with a UPS which can do at least 825W because of the increased load that a PFC power supply can put on it. If your rig isn't doing anywhere close to the 660W max output of your PSU, then you don't need to get such a large UPS. You can read more about how PFC power supplies affect a UPS here.
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post #9 of 39
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GasMan320 View Post

No, definitely not. If you want to go with APC, you can buy the APC BR1500G which is about the same price.
Since your power supply has an output of 660W you want to go with a UPS which can do at least 825W because of the increased load that a PFC power supply can put on it. If your rig isn't doing anywhere close to the 660W max output of your PSU, then you don't need to get such a large UPS. You can read more about how PFC power supplies affect a UPS here.

Ok. And how about the thing regarding UPS being Smart and non-smart, is that a big deal?

Do the recommendations you gave me best of their kind for both brands? Is their a computation of getting 825W?
post #10 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevindd992002 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by GasMan320 View Post

No, definitely not. If you want to go with APC, you can buy the APC BR1500G which is about the same price.
Since your power supply has an output of 660W you want to go with a UPS which can do at least 825W because of the increased load that a PFC power supply can put on it. If your rig isn't doing anywhere close to the 660W max output of your PSU, then you don't need to get such a large UPS. You can read more about how PFC power supplies affect a UPS here.

Ok. And how about the thing regarding UPS being Smart and non-smart, is that a big deal?

Do the recommendations you gave me best of their kind for both brands? Is their a computation of getting 825W?

APC has the Smart-UPS and Back-UPS product lines. Both are Off-Line models (line interactive is a fancy way of saying "more expensive off-line") and both of them offer voltage regulators and line filtering. The difference between them is the output waveform in back-up mode; Back-UPS use a PWM waveform while Smart-UPS units use a sine wave one (both of them are generated by PWM circuitry, but the Smart line has a different circuitry and more filter in it). Also the Smart-UPS usually have better communication with the PC (via USB and/or serial cable) and usually allow more configuration.

For your second question:

From APC's site describing PFC power supplies:
Quote:
An Energy Star 4.0 compliant power supply has to be more than 80% efficient. For example, if a PFC power supply is delivering 600W output power, its ‘input’ power can be as high as 750W. .

This ‘input’ power should be the basis for sizing the UPS, so as not to Overload the UPS. This can be calculated by taking the PFC power supply’s rated output power and multipling it by 1.25 as follows;

600W x 1.25 = 750w
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2013 Rig
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2012 Rig
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i5 2500K 4.8GHz @ 1.34v ASRock P67 Extreme4 B3 XFX Radeon HD 6850 1GB 8GB DDR3 1600 MHz CL8 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Crucial C300 128GB + 3x 1TB Spinpoint F3 RAID0 2x ASUS 24x DVD+-RW/DL Noctua NH-D14 Windows 7 Pro x64 SP1 
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Viewsonic 24" LED SeaSonic X650 Gold Cooler Master HAF X Onboard HD 
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