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1055T or 965BE OR 960T (DECIDED on 960T - OC and BM's inside) - Page 8

post #71 of 78
Thread Starter 
My brother got me an OCZ ZX 850 so I installed it and decided to re-run some benchmarks with my new GPU overclock.

I got my Sapphire Radeon 6850 running 1000/1150 @ 1.225mV

3DMark Vantage: P16051 3DMarks
http://3dmark.com/3dmv/3757372

Graphics Score
17021
CPU Score
13708
Jane Nash
50.5 FPS
New Calico
49.19 FPS
AI Test
1801 operations/s
Physics Test
20 operations/s

I was previously unable to get my GPU stable at these clocks with my old 550W PSU - She was tired.

Unigene Heaven DX11 Benchmark:

700

My scores increased nicely in the Unigene BM as well.

I was very happy with the build quality, and results of my new power supply. Definitely recommend it. I noticed the higher efficiency unit lowered my max CPU temps by roughly 7C which is incredible. I will be trying for 4.25GHz on my CPU now that I have cleaner power running through the system.
Edited by FromUndaChz - 12/24/11 at 12:59pm
post #72 of 78
FromUndaChz, thanks for the great write-up! I stumbled upon this post searching for OC info on my new 960T. I've applied what I learned from your experience and I have a question.

I was able to unlock the 5th core (unfortunately the 6th core is a dud). So I'm going through the entire OC process at both 4 and 5 cores because I wanted to see the performance and OC capabilities for both. I'm currently doing incremental increases on the CPU multiplier / vcore voltage with 5 cores and here are the results in comparison with 4 cores:

4 cores -
19x @ 1.3V (3800 MHz)
19.5x @ 1.34V (3900 MHz)
20x @ 1.37V (4000 MHz)

5 cores -
18x @1.3V (3600 MHz)
18.5x @ 1.33V (3700 MHz)
19x @ 1.36V (3800 MHz)
19.5x @ 1.39V (3900 MHz)
20x @ 1.44V (4000 MHz)

Do you or anyone else know if it's typical for the voltage requirements to be so much higher with 1 additional core? Any insight on this would be great.

Again, thanks for guide, really helped me understand the basics principals of OCing (this is my first real OC attempt).
post #73 of 78
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by adenvz View Post

FromUndaChz, thanks for the great write-up! I stumbled upon this post searching for OC info on my new 960T. I've applied what I learned from your experience and I have a question.
I was able to unlock the 5th core (unfortunately the 6th core is a dud). So I'm going through the entire OC process at both 4 and 5 cores because I wanted to see the performance and OC capabilities for both. I'm currently doing incremental increases on the CPU multiplier / vcore voltage with 5 cores and here are the results in comparison with 4 cores:
4 cores -
19x @ 1.3V (3800 MHz)
19.5x @ 1.34V (3900 MHz)
20x @ 1.37V (4000 MHz)
5 cores -
18x @1.3V (3600 MHz)
18.5x @ 1.33V (3700 MHz)
19x @ 1.36V (3800 MHz)
19.5x @ 1.39V (3900 MHz)
20x @ 1.44V (4000 MHz)
Do you or anyone else know if it's typical for the voltage requirements to be so much higher with 1 additional core? Any insight on this would be great.
Again, thanks for guide, really helped me understand the basics principals of OCing (this is my first real OC attempt).

Awesome dude, glad it helped! I was hoping I wasn't writing all of that for nothing lol.

It is normal for additional cores to require higher voltage for them to run stable... especially when you're turning on cores that AMD has already decided are "below par" - for this reason, they may run - but these cores can be less stable, or they may just not OC as well, or they may just require slightly higher voltage to run stable.

The lower the voltage, the lower the temps, the longer the chip will last... I have heard on the 960T not to go over 1.48 or so volts, but on the 1100T (6 core version of the 960T more or less, same Thuban cores) you can run to 1.55V - which I would assume is because of the two extra cores eating up more power.

You will be absolutely safe, in my honest opinion, with five cores at 1.45V so long as core temps stay below 55C - NEVER above 60C - and so long as you have decent airflow in your case to cool the VRMs on your motherboard.


Remember to OC using your FSB if you're feeling ambitious enough, then raise to multi to hone in on a MAX OC once you've gotten an idea for the max speed on your chip... You'll be able to get slightly better results in benchmarks than you would by just OCing the CPU using the Multi, even if you kept everything else (such as the RAM) at stock speeds. Not sure why, somebody else could probably explain, but it's basically a cleaner way of doing things.

Good luck and let me know if you need any help!
post #74 of 78
Thanks for the response, I was more curious than anything and assumed that was the reason for the increased voltage to achieve stability.

My temps are great, the highest it's been so far is 48C under load (P95 blend). I will be using my FSB to OC, I'm just going through all the steps. I haven't had the numbers you pulled with the initial FSB OC testing (not sure what this is due to).

Here are my current results for FSB:

4 cores -
250 @ 1.15V NB (was the higest I got at 1.15V, haven't tried uping the voltage yet)

5 cores -
245 @ 1.15V NB
couldn't get 250 stable, went up to 1.23V NB

Also, I did a preliminary 3DMark Vantage benchmark at identical OC settings (that were stable for both 4 and 5 cores). Here are the settings and the scores:

FSB 240 @ 1.15V
Multiplier 15x (3600 MHz) @ 1.3V vcore
8GB DDR3 @1600 9-9-9-24, 1.5V
All other settings at default
(GeForce GTX 460 SE)
(Thermaltake 700W PSU)
(ASUS M4A87TD motherboard)

3DMark Vantage scores
4 cores - P12454 (12499 gfx, 12322 cpu)
5 cores - P13015 (12379 gfx, 15386 cpu)

I didn't expect the jump in cpu score to be so significant (or at least it seems significant to me).

One other question I've been trying to find an answer to is, what replacement should I use for Cool 'n Quiet (which is disabled)? Or do I even need replacement software for it? I'm mostly wondering how much not having a software replacement (phenom tweaker for example) will affect my electric bill, heh. Or am I wrong in my understanding that Cool 'n Quiet is primarily for energy conservation?
post #75 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by adenvz View Post

Thanks for the response, I was more curious than anything and assumed that was the reason for the increased voltage to achieve stability.
My temps are great, the highest it's been so far is 48C under load (P95 blend). I will be using my FSB to OC, I'm just going through all the steps. I haven't had the numbers you pulled with the initial FSB OC testing (not sure what this is due to).
Here are my current results for FSB:
4 cores -
250 @ 1.15V NB (was the higest I got at 1.15V, haven't tried uping the voltage yet)
5 cores -
245 @ 1.15V NB
couldn't get 250 stable, went up to 1.23V NB
Also, I did a preliminary 3DMark Vantage benchmark at identical OC settings (that were stable for both 4 and 5 cores). Here are the settings and the scores:
FSB 240 @ 1.15V
Multiplier 15x (3600 MHz) @ 1.3V vcore
8GB DDR3 @1600 9-9-9-24, 1.5V
All other settings at default
(GeForce GTX 460 SE)
(Thermaltake 700W PSU)
(ASUS M4A87TD motherboard)
3DMark Vantage scores
4 cores - P12454 (12499 gfx, 12322 cpu)
5 cores - P13015 (12379 gfx, 15386 cpu)
I didn't expect the jump in cpu score to be so significant (or at least it seems significant to me).
One other question I've been trying to find an answer to is, what replacement should I use for Cool 'n Quiet (which is disabled)? Or do I even need replacement software for it? I'm mostly wondering how much not having a software replacement (phenom tweaker for example) will affect my electric bill, heh. Or am I wrong in my understanding that Cool 'n Quiet is primarily for energy conservation?

Turn off the PC when not in-use and you will have no need for Q&C. smile.gif

Best advise i can give you lol. K10stat would probably work as well, but it's a pain to use, as it will edit the Power states for Q&C.

I just use the normal windows one, mainly the one for powering off the monitor when not in use. All the other stuff, meh.
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post #76 of 78
Thread Starter 
Turn of cool and quiet and don't worry about it - it's a power saving feature, it will extend the chip life but we overclockers don't expect our chips to really last for five years anyway. Disable cool n' quiet in the BIOS and let her rip.

The big jump in CPU scores is to be expected, you're adding a whole extra core to the processing power of your computer - that's a 25% increase in CPU cores which should translate into a pretty big improvement.

I cannot seem to get mine to run on five cores, but I think it's a BIOS issue and not my chip. I may try my chip in my girlfriend's Gigabyte mobo and see if I can't verify the extra cores . Just curious, does your Asus Mobo have a UEFI BIOS? If so, what version? Thanks..

Sounds like you're on the right track and doing well, good luck and again - let us know if you need a hand.
post #77 of 78
Thanks for the responses!

My MB doesn't have a UEFI BIOS. I noticed in your screen shots, yours does. Did it come with it? Or did you add it?
post #78 of 78
Thread Starter 
It came with it... it's half the reason I chose the board that I did. I like UEFI it just takes a lot of getting used to coming from a standard old school BIOS.

Most old school BIOS will have all the same functionality mine does, just slightly less options or control but the same basic concepts and numbers/theories apply when overclocking any AMD machine.
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