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Dailytech: RFID Embedded Discs to Stop Piracy for Good Says Ritek - Page 3

post #21 of 38
Question: How the heck is the disc going to rotate at a constant speed if there is an RFID chip adding weight to one end of it? I guess there would have to be multiple, counterbalancing chips spaced around the disc...but even then, they would have to be weighted and spaced pretty precisely to avoid unwanted variations in rotation speed.

How this could be hacked: The RF in RFID stands for "radio frequency". I.e., the information is simply broadcast over the air, but only over very short distances (about 10 feet, if I recall correctly). The RFID reader in the optical drives will not be aware of exactly where the RFID signal it is reading is coming from; so the simple way that the hacking community could get around this is to place an "RFID broadcaster" device in close proximity to their disc player. Once someone figures out what specific code a disc needs to broadcast (which will be the hardest part, since it will certainly be encrypted), they have their broadcaster send that signal and voila! RFID DRM is bypassed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thumper
It's not illegal to make a backup copy of something you own. I am in no danger of going to jail for placing movies I legally purchased in retail packaging into my home theater computer.
As has been stated about a bazillion times before, this is not always true. If the media that you legally purchased has DRM/copy protection on it, then it is a violation of the Digital Millenium Copyright Act to bypass that protection, even to make a backup for personal use. So ripping a CD is usually fine, since they rarely have copy protection on the disc; but ripping a DVD is almost always illegal because you are breaking the CSS encryption algorithm on the disc.
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post #22 of 38
Appears this goes deeper than just DRM??


http://www.afterdawn.com/news/archive/7940.cfm


Quote:
DVDs will soon be embedded with radio transmitter chips which will allow the major movie studios to remotely track individual discs as they travel from factories to retail shelves and to consumers' homes.


The companies behind the new advance say living room DVD players will eventually be able to check on the chip embedded in a disc, and reject any discs which have been copied or played in the 'wrong' geographical region.
Added emphesis to the important parts.

So, individual discs? How?? GPS tracking units? Wow, um, invasion of privacy? This means that they can be instantly aware of anyplace I go with my DVD.

Also, looks like people can't enjoy imports anymore. Guess I can't purchase British imports anymore.....nope, I'll watch just exactly what THEY want me to watch I guess.......


Funny, everyone spent years worrying about the government becoming big brother.....watching everything we do, telling us what to watch and what to think...............turns out, it's Hollywood.

post #23 of 38
Well, "remotely track" does not mean they have spy satellites following your every move. It just means that the scanner only needs to be in close proximity to what is being scanned, as opposed to right up against it like a bar code reader. RFID is already heavily used in shipping; e.g., any company that wants to do business with Wal-Mart must embed RFID chips in their palettes of merchandise. It is less commonly done at low levels, but theoretically embedding an RFID chip in a DVD case makes a lot of sense; managers could perform inventory counts just by walking down the store aisle, and that data could be instantly uploaded into the larger chain's inventory system for all sorts of boring management goodness (like auto-diverting new purchases to the stores that are actually moving the merchandise).

But inside the DVD disc itself? I still just don't get it. The so-called "copy protection" will be quickly bypassed, anyone can predict that. And I'm still confused about the whole weighting-of-the-disc issue. DVDs do need to spin at fairly constant speeds to be read correctly, don't they?
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post #24 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by VulcanDragon
Well, "remotely track" does not mean they have spy satellites following your every move. It just means that the scanner only needs to be in close proximity to what is being scanned

It is less commonly done at low levels, but theoretically embedding an RFID chip in a DVD case makes a lot of sense; managers could perform inventory counts just by walking down the store aisle,

Perhaps, but the statement about following the disc to consumers homes means it must be more than the standard inventory chips they have now.......


Quote:
Originally Posted by VulcanDragon
But inside the DVD disc itself? I still just don't get it. The so-called "copy protection" will be quickly bypassed, anyone can predict that. And I'm still confused about the whole weighting-of-the-disc issue. DVDs do need to spin at fairly constant speeds to be read correctly, don't they?
Well, since it will be "hardware" copy protection, it would be harder to crack, but yeah, as far as I know, they have to spin straight and fast......
post #25 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thumper
Well, since it will be "hardware" copy protection, it would be harder to crack, but yeah, as far as I know, they have to spin straight and fast......
But like I said, the hardware part of this is easy. Just place an RFID simulator (i.e., a small piece of hardware that responds to signal requests from RFID scanners) anywhere in the vicinity of the player. That reduces the problem to pure software; which is still very hard if the necessary tokens are encrypted and secret.
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post #26 of 38
I for one welcome these chips. After cds become uncrackable, I believe there will be a decline of sales instead of an increase. Hopefully they music industry will realize the giant mistake they made and put everything back to normal and stop all this anti-piracy crap.

To be honest, I rarely buy cds. I have downloaded the majority of my music collection for free. Even if downloading wasn't possible, I'm positive I still wouldn't buy many cds. I just simply don't have the money. I wouldn't even listen to that much music simply because of that fact. I think artists should be grateful that they at least have one more fan instead of getting pissy over a few dollars. Also, even thought I don't buy cds often, I still tend to buy some of their other merch like live dvds and shirts. On occasions that that I do actually buy a cd, it's because the band have showed enough consistency that I know I won't won't be wasting my money by purchasing their newest cd. Sadly, this is rare though because the majority of bands I've given a chance only have a few good cds/songs due to the way record companies try to force bands to make their music more "accessible" and completely ruin what the band intended make. I'm not going to waste my money on something that may possibly be good. I need to sample the music first.

I don't listen to the radio often. I usually discover all my favorite bands from downloading their music after hearing something about them on the web or doing some research on bands that play the type of music I'm into. This is another way that I decide whether or not to buy a cd. I download a few tracks to see if the band is any good and if they are, I might just buy one of their cds if I have some extra cash.

I know a lot fo people who have the exact same buying habits as I do. This could only hurt the music industry, not increase sales.
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post #27 of 38
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v4ugh3J7dKk

"Don't take away money from artists just like me
How else can I afford another solid gold Humvee
And diamond studded swimming pools.
These things don't grow on trees."

Why can't more people think like Al.
    
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post #28 of 38
Uhh... they can never stop piracy. It's impossible no matter what they do. As long as the sound waves are flying through the air they can be captured. You can't copy protect sound waves
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post #29 of 38
It will be broken. No doubt in my mind about that one.

I don't agree with the hackers, because the companies do have to make money, but I agree even less with the companines. DRM is going a little too far...
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post #30 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fishie36
Uhh... they can never stop piracy. It's impossible no matter what they do. As long as the sound waves are flying through the air they can be captured. You can't copy protect sound waves

LOL they tried....I remember hearing about the RIAA suing XM or maybe it was sSirrus, for developing a unit to allow their subscribers to record their favorite songs (you know, kind of like we did back in the old days with tapes and the FM stations LOL)......they claimed it was copyright infringment to record music from the radio........
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