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Setting up computers?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
Just wondering how those of you in charge of networks will set up a new computer on a domain?

For example, my work buys HP computers. When setting it up, there's the local computer and then there's the domain. Joining the domain is easy, but how do you set up the local computer so that the user won't be able to access it?

Do you use the typical "Administrator" account or do you make another one?
post #2 of 7
If I understand you correctly, you want to know how you should srt up local user accounts?


At my job, we set it up this way. If the system will be part of the domain and is a PC (ie, not a mobile unit), we have a sysprep image, deploy it, and in it have two local Admin accounts Administrator and another account. Then we put it on the domain, which we have admin accounts as well. I hope this answers your question. The user never is informed about the password for the local accounts, of course.
post #3 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by cubanresourceful View Post

If I understand you correctly, you want to know how you should srt up local user accounts?
At my job, we set it up this way. If the system will be part of the domain and is a PC (ie, not a mobile unit), we have a sysprep image, deploy it, and in it have two local Admin accounts Administrator and another account. Then we put it on the domain, which we have admin accounts as well. I hope this answers your question. The user never is informed about the password for the local accounts, of course.

This is how we do it as well. thumb.gif Makes life easy especially when you're joining up 20-30 boxes a week.
post #4 of 7
Local accounts should only be used by the administrator, not the user, they're on the domain. I agree with the above to use a master image to get them setup quickly and hopefully avoid headaches.
post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 
That's exactly what I was looking for. smile.gif Thank you! I still have a few questions but I think they're more technical so thank you for the answer to my question! For some reason, I kind of figure that was how it was done.

Where I work, whenever we get a new computer I will always make another administrator account, usually called Companynet (Company being the name of where I work). This will essentially be my local administrator account that only I will have access to. From here I will change the administrator settings to how I like, add all the required software, drivers, etc. and then add the domain and have the user login. Is this what you guys were explaining? I just want to make sure you don't install the software from the domain administrator, or is this viable too?

I don't know how to make a master image but I'm sure that would save me a ton of time from changing all the settings and installing software and stuff, right? frown.gif
post #6 of 7
As an FYI, in my place we use DELLs, so I don't know if this applies to HPs, but boot up the system before using a Ghost image and/or sysprep. On DELLs, on the root of C, there's usually a driver folder, which comes in handy when using sysprep since after you sysprep, all drivers need to be installed when you first boot up (unless Microsoft has a generic driver). If HPs do this too, save that folder to a share path on the domain, so that next time you're working with a new system of the same model, you can apply the drivers.
post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by xyeLz View Post

That's exactly what I was looking for. smile.gif Thank you! I still have a few questions but I think they're more technical so thank you for the answer to my question! For some reason, I kind of figure that was how it was done.
Where I work, whenever we get a new computer I will always make another administrator account, usually called Companynet (Company being the name of where I work). This will essentially be my local administrator account that only I will have access to. From here I will change the administrator settings to how I like, add all the required software, drivers, etc. and then add the domain and have the user login. Is this what you guys were explaining? I just want to make sure you don't install the software from the domain administrator, or is this viable too?
I don't know how to make a master image but I'm sure that would save me a ton of time from changing all the settings and installing software and stuff, right? frown.gif

I'll tell you how we do it, but you can do it how you like. Learn how to sysprep, it's amazing and a time saving tool, if you want a standard image across your IT group, organization, company, or even for all your customers.

We have a base sysprep image, with standard softwares installed like Acrobat Pro, MS OFFICE and Visio, Roxio, etc. We also have the theme customized to classic, etc. This applies to the default profile so in your new image, every new user account will have these settings! Some settings, however, do not carry through a sysprep image, like the Windows 7 Security Notification settings.

Then, once we have all the drivers, we take a ghost image, as a JIC kind of thing. Then we customize for the user, put it on the domain, log in as the user, and install any software that's extra the user may need. Once that's completed, we take another image and name it "user's domain account".gho (or whatever extension your imaging program uses).

Here's the reason we take two images. The first image, the one taken before customizing for the user or putting on the domain (but with all softwares activated and drivers installed) is for if we have to transfer the system to another user, we start back at this image, and then do the customizations for the new user. Also, if you take an image of the system on the domain, and then restore that images months later, the domain salt (or whatever it's called) will be expired and you will have to take the system off the domain then put it back on. This wastes time.

The second image is used for when the users messes up the system with a virus and such, and it's pretty bad, we restore to this image since it has no data, is customized for the user, and is known to be good.

Let me know if you'd like more infos. smile.gif
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