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How do you open an application in Linux

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
All I want to do is download a stress testing program. Ok, so now I have a tar.gz file and after several hours I *think* I have installed it....

But now what? The program does now show up under my applications folder? No executable is generated?

The instructions say that it will create the application in /usr/local/bin...so I open the folder and I see nothing

Someone please help an idiot at Linux and you will be repped generously

This is the code I have entered in terminal, verbatim and in chronological order:
Code:
ls
cd Downloads/stress-1.0.4
sudo ./configure
sudo make
sudo make install

This is the response:
Code:
ubuntu@ubuntu:~/Downloads/stress-1.0.4$ sudo ./configure
checking for a BSD-compatible install... /usr/bin/install -c
checking whether build environment is sane... yes
checking for a thread-safe mkdir -p... /bin/mkdir -p
checking for gawk... no
checking for mawk... mawk
checking whether make sets $(MAKE)... yes
checking for gcc... gcc
checking for C compiler default output file name... a.out
checking whether the C compiler works... yes
checking whether we are cross compiling... no
checking for suffix of executables...
checking for suffix of object files... o
checking whether we are using the GNU C compiler... yes
checking whether gcc accepts -g... yes
checking for gcc option to accept ISO C89... none needed
checking for style of include used by make... GNU
checking dependency style of gcc... gcc3
checking how to run the C preprocessor... gcc -E
checking for grep that handles long lines and -e... /bin/grep
checking for egrep... /bin/grep -E
checking for ANSI C header files... yes
checking for sys/types.h... yes
checking for sys/stat.h... yes
checking for stdlib.h... yes
checking for string.h... yes
checking for memory.h... yes
checking for strings.h... yes
checking for inttypes.h... yes
checking for stdint.h... yes
checking for unistd.h... yes
checking for unistd.h... (cached) yes
checking for sqrt in -lm... yes
checking for basename in -lgen... no
configure: creating ./config.status
config.status: creating Makefile
config.status: creating src/Makefile
config.status: creating doc/Makefile
config.status: creating test/Makefile
config.status: executing depfiles commands
ubuntu@ubuntu:~/Downloads/stress-1.0.4$ sudo make
Making all in .
make[1]: Entering directory `/home/ubuntu/Downloads/stress-1.0.4'
make[1]: Nothing to be done for `all-am'.
make[1]: Leaving directory `/home/ubuntu/Downloads/stress-1.0.4'
Making all in src
make[1]: Entering directory `/home/ubuntu/Downloads/stress-1.0.4/src'
make[1]: Nothing to be done for `all'.
make[1]: Leaving directory `/home/ubuntu/Downloads/stress-1.0.4/src'
Making all in doc
make[1]: Entering directory `/home/ubuntu/Downloads/stress-1.0.4/doc'
make[1]: Nothing to be done for `all'.
make[1]: Leaving directory `/home/ubuntu/Downloads/stress-1.0.4/doc'
Making all in test
make[1]: Entering directory `/home/ubuntu/Downloads/stress-1.0.4/test'
make[1]: Nothing to be done for `all'.
make[1]: Leaving directory `/home/ubuntu/Downloads/stress-1.0.4/test'
ubuntu@ubuntu:~/Downloads/stress-1.0.4$ sudo make install
Making install in .
make[1]: Entering directory `/home/ubuntu/Downloads/stress-1.0.4'
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/ubuntu/Downloads/stress-1.0.4'
make[2]: Nothing to be done for `install-exec-am'.
make[2]: Nothing to be done for `install-data-am'.
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/ubuntu/Downloads/stress-1.0.4'
make[1]: Leaving directory `/home/ubuntu/Downloads/stress-1.0.4'
Making install in src
make[1]: Entering directory `/home/ubuntu/Downloads/stress-1.0.4/src'
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/ubuntu/Downloads/stress-1.0.4/src'
test -z "/usr/local/bin" || /bin/mkdir -p "/usr/local/bin"
  /usr/bin/install -c 'stress' '/usr/local/bin/stress'
make[2]: Nothing to be done for `install-data-am'.
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/ubuntu/Downloads/stress-1.0.4/src'
make[1]: Leaving directory `/home/ubuntu/Downloads/stress-1.0.4/src'
Making install in doc
make[1]: Entering directory `/home/ubuntu/Downloads/stress-1.0.4/doc'
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/ubuntu/Downloads/stress-1.0.4/doc'
make[2]: Nothing to be done for `install-exec-am'.
test -z "/usr/local/share/info" || /bin/mkdir -p "/usr/local/share/info"
 /usr/bin/install -c -m 644 './stress.info' '/usr/local/share/info/stress.info'
 install-info --info-dir='/usr/local/share/info' '/usr/local/share/info/stress.info'
This is not dpkg install-info anymore, but GNU install-info
See the man page for ginstall-info for command line arguments
test -z "/usr/local/share/man/man1" || /bin/mkdir -p "/usr/local/share/man/man1"
 /usr/bin/install -c -m 644 'stress.1' '/usr/local/share/man/man1/stress.1'
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/ubuntu/Downloads/stress-1.0.4/doc'
make[1]: Leaving directory `/home/ubuntu/Downloads/stress-1.0.4/doc'
Making install in test
make[1]: Entering directory `/home/ubuntu/Downloads/stress-1.0.4/test'
make[2]: Entering directory `/home/ubuntu/Downloads/stress-1.0.4/test'
make[2]: Nothing to be done for `install-exec-am'.
make[2]: Nothing to be done for `install-data-am'.
make[2]: Leaving directory `/home/ubuntu/Downloads/stress-1.0.4/test'
make[1]: Leaving directory `/home/ubuntu/Downloads/stress-1.0.4/test'

Edited by kiwiasian - 1/7/12 at 3:36pm
post #2 of 12
First tell us about the program. If you installed it correctly, it might also be in the /usr/bin folder where nearly all excutables are located. Look there.

Also open up a terminal (from anywhere), and start typing the first few letters of the application, and then press tab (if it doesn't go the first time, double tap tab). It will show you the list of options that it can complete if there are multiple applications that start with the similar letter sequence. If you nailed it, it should just autocomplete the application in the terminal. Then just press enter and enjoy.

Good luck.
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post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 
This is the program: http://weather.ou.edu/~apw/projects/stress/

I did not find anything in /usr/bin.

I just typed "stress" in terminal and something did indeed come up. Let's see how far I can get from here, thank you.
post #4 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by kiwiasian View Post

This is the program: http://weather.ou.edu/~apw/projects/stress/
I did not find anything in /usr/bin.
I just typed "stress" in terminal and something did indeed come up. Let's see how far I can get from here, thank you.

That's it. It's a terminal based program, so it's no surprise that it didn't come up in your GUI menu. A "man stress" command will open up the manual page for the application. It's scant, but I think it is because it's a simple application.
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post #5 of 12
I'm not very familiar with Linux and didn't look at the make file but try this:

Go in the directory where the source code is and type "make" or "make check". Once that's complete, type "make install" and it should install itself and you should be able to find it then.
post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 
Ok, I got the stress program working correctly now. What's the best CPU-Z alternative for Linux? I'm not looking for something featured and complex but honestly just something that I can install in less than an hour...
post #7 of 12
Thread Starter 
Nevermind, doing cat /proc/cpuinfo over and over again in terminal is sufficient.
post #8 of 12
Did you configure / make / make install manually ? is it a .deb or .rpm file ? usually most apps get installed under /usr/ .
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post #9 of 12
Funny story: I was just looking for stress testing programs earlier today, probably about the same time you were, and I also stumbled upon this program. But I was too lazy to install it =P

What you just did was compile a program from its source. A lot of the time when you do this, it's for a text-based program, and you're going to have to go into a terminal and type the command to run it. When you compile from source, you don't usually get the icons on your desktop or Application folders. The reason you get these extras when you use a package manager is because a package manager is designed to automatically create and move those things around for you.
post #10 of 12
your stress is in /usr/local/bin. just type stress in the CLI.
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