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[Official] AMD Radeon HD 7950/7970/7990 Owners Thread - Page 1310

post #13091 of 38701
Quick question, I'm hitting roughly 8600P on 3dmark11 performance settings and I feel it should be higher. Am I right? Specs are in sig rig and my card is a Gigabyte 7950 1100/1575 oc

http://3dmark.com/3dm11/3679521
Edited by Blaze0303 - 7/9/12 at 10:16pm
    
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post #13092 of 38701
Quote:
Originally Posted by FtW 420 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Majin SSJ Eric View Post

Set your power limit to max....

I was testing with this the other day, with the power limit at 0 I was running 1300 core/1800 memory for multiple benches, I tried setting to +20 & It was unstable in everything. Reset to 0 power limit again, & the card was happily doing 1300/1800 once more.
Seems confusing that higher power limit does lower clocks...

I'll explain why. smile.gif

In the slider’s default position, the coprocessor that governs AMD PowerTune will intelligently manage the GPU’s core clockspeed based on the default thermal profile of the product; a hypothetical enthusiast product might be 250W. Maybe something like a 7970 would be limited to 300W draw, but I don't know the exact number.

From there, AMD PowerTune is essentially biased towards maintaining the clockspeed defined by the user or vBIOS, whichever is higher, within the limits of the configured TDP. This is driven by the AMD PowerTune logic, which forecasts the GPU’s future thermal profile based on the past few microseconds of activity.

Now that you know that, it’s easier to understand how the slider works. By decreasing the slider into the negative range, the user can effectively tell the AMD PowerTune logic to simulate a board with a TDP that’s up to 20% lower. This could be good for HTPCs or power-constrained SFF systems with smaller PSUs. In contrast, increasing the slider can effectively raise the board’s TDP by 20% of the baseline. In our hypothetical example, that's 360W for a reference product.

If a user attempts to run an application that pushes the GPU to exceed the PowerTune TDP threshold, the ASIC may throttle the clockspeed, which would cause a dip in performance even though you've raised the clockspeeds. It may also cause the board to draw more power than the ASIC's accompanying circuitry can handle, which could explain why you found instability at 1300/1800 @ +20%.

For the average gamer, PowerTune lets us design boards with higher reference clocks, because we're no longer constrained to saying "welp, this board hits 250W at 650MHz under FurMark, guess we have to ship it at 650MHz." Now we can say, "hey, every game we've tested stays under 250W at 900MHz! Ship it at 900!" PowerTune can push unrealistic, synthetic apps like FurMark/3DMark Perlin Noise down and drag up the performance of games across the board.

//EDIT: It also allows us to guarantee the wattage of a board. There are no fuzzy estimations. If we say the product has a peak draw of 250W, that is exactly what it has, and not one watt more. The OEMs love it, and it makes it a lot easier for a savvy user to fit a GPU into their PSU's power budget.
Edited by Thracks - 7/9/12 at 10:28pm
post #13093 of 38701
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thracks View Post

I'll explain why. smile.gif
In the slider’s default position, the coprocessor that governs AMD PowerTune will intelligently manage the GPU’s core clockspeed based on the default thermal profile of the product; a hypothetical enthusiast product might be 250W. Maybe something like a 7970 would be limited to 300W draw, but I don't know the exact number.
From there, AMD PowerTune is essentially biased towards maintaining the clockspeed defined by the user or vBIOS, whichever is higher, within the limits of the configured TDP. This is driven by the AMD PowerTune logic, which forecasts the GPU’s future thermal profile based on the past few microseconds of activity.
Now that you know that, it’s easier to understand how the slider works. By decreasing the slider into the negative range, the user can effectively tell the AMD PowerTune logic to simulate a board with a TDP that’s up to 20% lower. This could be good for HTPCs or power-constrained SFF systems with smaller PSUs. In contrast, increasing the slider can effectively raise the board’s TDP by 20% of the baseline. In our hypothetical example, that's 360W for a reference product.
If a user attempts to run an application that pushes the GPU to exceed the PowerTune TDP threshold, the ASIC may throttle the clockspeed, which would cause a dip in performance even though you've raised the clockspeeds. It may also cause the board to draw more power than the ASIC's accompanying circuitry can handle, which could explain why you found instability at 1300/1800 @ +20%.
For the average gamer, PowerTune lets us design boards with higher reference clocks, because we're no longer constrained to saying "welp, this board hits 250W at 650MHz under FurMark, guess we have to ship it at 650MHz." Now we can say, "hey, every game we've tested stays under 250W at 900MHz! Ship it at 900!" PowerTune can push unrealistic, synthetic apps like FurMark/3DMark Perlin Noise down and drag up the performance of games across the board.

What about my issue on the last page amd rep guy. thumb.gif
15 year Nvidia gpu only owner lol dont make me regret the switch lol tongue.gif
    
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post #13094 of 38701
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thracks View Post

I'll explain why. smile.gif
In the slider’s default position, the coprocessor that governs AMD PowerTune will intelligently manage the GPU’s core clockspeed based on the default thermal profile of the product; a hypothetical enthusiast product might be 250W. Maybe something like a 7970 would be limited to 300W draw, but I don't know the exact number.
From there, AMD PowerTune is essentially biased towards maintaining the clockspeed defined by the user or vBIOS, whichever is higher, within the limits of the configured TDP. This is driven by the AMD PowerTune logic, which forecasts the GPU’s future thermal profile based on the past few microseconds of activity.
Now that you know that, it’s easier to understand how the slider works. By decreasing the slider into the negative range, the user can effectively tell the AMD PowerTune logic to simulate a board with a TDP that’s up to 20% lower. This could be good for HTPCs or power-constrained SFF systems with smaller PSUs. In contrast, increasing the slider can effectively raise the board’s TDP by 20% of the baseline. In our hypothetical example, that's 360W for a reference product.
If a user attempts to run an application that pushes the GPU to exceed the PowerTune TDP threshold, the ASIC may throttle the clockspeed, which would cause a dip in performance even though you've raised the clockspeeds. It may also cause the board to draw more power than the ASIC's accompanying circuitry can handle, which could explain why you found instability at 1300/1800 @ +20%.
For the average gamer, PowerTune lets us design boards with higher reference clocks, because we're no longer constrained to saying "welp, this board hits 250W at 650MHz under FurMark, guess we have to ship it at 650MHz." Now we can say, "hey, every game we've tested stays under 250W at 900MHz! Ship it at 900!" PowerTune can push unrealistic, synthetic apps like FurMark/3DMark Perlin Noise down and drag up the performance of games across the board.
//EDIT: It also allows us to guarantee the wattage of a board. There are no fuzzy estimations. If we say the product has a peak draw of 250W, that is exactly what it has, and not one watt more. The OEMs love it, and it makes it a lot easier for a savvy user to fit a GPU into their PSU's power budget.


How are GPU voltage's relationship with powertune? Does increasing the voltage override the powertune or powertune overrides the manually increased voltage. Thanks AMD guy.
post #13095 of 38701
Increasing the voltage will increase the thermal output of the ASIC, just like OCing a CPU by upping the vcore increases heat. So if you leave the PowerTune slider in the default position, it's entirely possible that PowerTune would kick in sooner to avoid a thermal event--it really depends on the cooling of the system.

PowerTune watches the ASIC's junction temperature and the amperage going into the VRMs to forecast how it's going to manage the clockspeed in the next few microseconds.

If you increase vcore and want to avoid PowerTune kicking the clockspeed down, you need to:

A) Be sure you're not going to go past about 80C for Southern Islands.
B) You've increased the PowerTune slider to accommodate the ASIC's new, higher heat output.
post #13096 of 38701
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thracks View Post

Increasing the voltage will increase the thermal output of the ASIC, just like OCing a CPU by upping the vcore increases heat. So if you leave the PowerTune slider in the default position, it's entirely possible that PowerTune would kick in sooner to avoid a thermal event--it really depends on the cooling of the system.
PowerTune watches the ASIC's junction temperature and the amperage going into the VRMs to forecast how it's going to manage the clockspeed in the next few microseconds.
If you increase vcore and want to avoid PowerTune kicking the clockspeed down, you need to:
A) Be sure you're not going to go past about 80C for Southern Islands.
B) You've increased the PowerTune slider to accommodate the ASIC's new, higher heat output.

So that is why I had problem with OC on high temps when powertune on 0. Thank so much AMD guy. What would be the maximum temp before throttling on 7970 at powertune 20%?
post #13097 of 38701
Quote:
Originally Posted by FtW 420 View Post

I was testing with this the other day, with the power limit at 0 I was running 1300 core/1800 memory for multiple benches, I tried setting to +20 & It was unstable in everything. Reset to 0 power limit again, & the card was happily doing 1300/1800 once more.
Seems confusing that higher power limit does lower clocks...

Power limit only affect with MSI mobo + MSI VGA + MSI Afterburner smile.gif
I use MSI Z77 GD65 + MSI HD7870 TF OC + MSI Afterburner, if I set powerllimit to zero or default it will not boost enough in benchmarking scores...or like bottleneck I guess, but with max powerlimit it goes normally smile.gif
When I swapped to Powercolor HD7970v2 dualfan then changing powerlimit didnot affect anything.... only in vantage if you guys notice, feature test 1 and feature test r 6 are affected by changing powerlimit. Example : with zero powerlimit feature test 6 got 250 points but with max powerlimit feature test 6 got 330 poinst.
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post #13098 of 38701
I believe the 7970 is programmed to avoid meltdown around 85-90C, which is when the fans will go into dustbuster mode.

But if you're doing heavy OCing at +20% PowerTune, I would assume that you have decent cooling. Your main concern then would be having a board that's engineered to withstand the TDP you're allowing the card to hit. You know, maybe they used cheaper caps/VRMs or less power phases than somebody else's, and that could cause problems.

As with anything, you generally get what you pay for. I love the R7970 Lightnings myself.

//EDIT: I accidentally a word.
post #13099 of 38701
Quote:
Originally Posted by neoroy View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by FtW 420 View Post

I was testing with this the other day, with the power limit at 0 I was running 1300 core/1800 memory for multiple benches, I tried setting to +20 & It was unstable in everything. Reset to 0 power limit again, & the card was happily doing 1300/1800 once more.
Seems confusing that higher power limit does lower clocks...

Power limit only affect with MSI mobo + MSI VGA + MSI Afterburner smile.gif
I use MSI Z77 GD65 + MSI HD7870 TF OC + MSI Afterburner, if I set powerllimit to zero or default it will not boost enough in benchmarking scores...or like bottleneck I guess, but with max powerlimit it goes normally smile.gif
When I swapped to Powercolor HD7970v2 dualfan then changing powerlimit didnot affect anything.... only in vantage if you guys notice, feature test 1 and feature test r 6 are affected by changing powerlimit. Example : with zero powerlimit feature test 6 got 250 points but with max powerlimit feature test 6 got 330 poinst.

No, that is incorrect. Powertune affects EVERY AMD graphics card (that has that feature). It is NOT just an MSI thing, its an AMD thing. Reason your Powercolor card wasn't affected to the same degree could simply be because its got a different default voltage, ASIC, or you weren't pushing the card hard enough.
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post #13100 of 38701
Pioneerisloud is right. It's a BIOS and ASIC-level feature built into these products: All Radeon 6900 (incl. 6990), 7700, 7800 and 7900 Products.
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