Overclock.net › Forums › Intel › Intel CPUs › Complete Overclocking Guide: Sandy Bridge & Ivy Bridge | *ASRock Edition*
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Complete Overclocking Guide: Sandy Bridge & Ivy Bridge | *ASRock Edition* - Page 578

Poll Results: Was this guide helpful?

Poll expired: Oct 17, 2012  
  • 80% (237)
    Yes (and I DO have an ASRock motherboard).
  • 15% (45)
    Yes (but I DO NOT have an ASRock motherboard).
  • 2% (7)
    No (and I DO have an ASRock motherboard).
  • 2% (7)
    No (but I DO NOT have an ASRock motherboard).
296 Total Votes  
post #5771 of 9531
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattb2e View Post

anyone use a h110i with ivy? I'm curious how much of an impact an upgrade to an AIO cooler would make compared to my current cooler.
There's no such thing as an h110i, there's h100i and h110, different blocks/pumps/mounts, 100 is 120mm 110 is 140mm, same performance give or take
post #5772 of 9531
Quote:
Originally Posted by Qlix View Post

There's no such thing as an h110i, there's h100i and h110, different blocks/pumps/mounts, 100 is 120mm 110 is 140mm, same performance give or take

haha, too many numbers floating around in my head, I have been looking at the H110 and the H100i, so my question was pertaining to the H100i. My apologies tongue.gif.

I wish the H110 would fit, but I wont be able to install it without custom mounts. From what I have seen the H110 is slightly better in terms of noise due to the lower RPM fans.

I know the H100i will fit with room to spare, in push pull if I would like, the question is how much better will it perform for me than what I currently have.....
post #5773 of 9531
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucky 23 View Post

You can't go that high on stock volts, maybe 3.4 or 3.6ghz. In order to hit 4.0ghz+ your definitely going to need to increase vcore

I just sold a Gigabyte GA-EP35-DS3L on craigslist for $40 so a different board is not going to be too expensive

3.6 - 3.8 would be perfect....I'm not trying to OC for a record here....Someone mentioned soldering resistors - now we're getting into some solutions. Do you have more info on that? I'm apparently stuck with this mobo since someone threw away the packaging....
post #5774 of 9531
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucky 23 View Post

You can't go that high on stock volts, maybe 3.4 or 3.6ghz. In order to hit 4.0ghz+ your definitely going to need to increase vcore

I just sold a Gigabyte GA-EP35-DS3L on craigslist for $40 so a different board is not going to be too expensive

I check Craigslist about every 15 minutes to see if a better board becomes available in my area, with no results....I'm glad to hear that you were able to get rid of one, but no one anywhere near me seems to be selling one....I'm not the type of person that avoids searching myself, I'm asking for help because of the fact that I hit a wall in my researching....After reading a bunch of posts on this site, I determined that there are a bunch of members of this site that have a lot of useful knowledge - and people that seem to like to help and see what their computer components can do....
post #5775 of 9531
Quote:
Every chip is different. What voltage intel sets for your chip is the "VID", you have a high VID. "offset voltage" is the amount that the voltage curve is moved up and down for every multiplier. With the voltage you are receiving, you could probably stabilize 44 or 45 without adding much or possibly any extra voltage. 1.3 is not too high, its moderate, many many people run that same voltage and more daily without noticeable degradation. As for the temperatures, you are 55C away from TJMAX...your fine, nothing to be afraid of.

If you do not have a good reason to use fixed voltage...don't. It shortens the life of a chip compared to one that is allowed to idle at lower volts (akthough at 1.120 you will be FAR from degradation), and it uses more power from the wall than offset. Look at it like this...lawnmowers have fixed voltage, and cars have offset. The car goes whatever speed you push the petal, but that lawnmower only has go and stop.

Keep it on offset and move just the multiplier up. Your temps wont go up until you voltage goes up.

So, in my case, would you recommend setting the offset to a negative value? I find that the main culprit of the high temperatures when setting it to 4ghz is the high voltage levels... I kind of feel that having a +0.05 offset is letting the CPU run too freely when it comes to controlling the voltage, this is why I thought a fixed voltage would be better, and it has proved to be that so far...

I am really reluctant to keep the fixed voltage, so any recommendations you make will be greatly appreciated.

Cheers.
post #5776 of 9531
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattb2e View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Qlix View Post

There's no such thing as an h110i, there's h100i and h110, different blocks/pumps/mounts, 100 is 120mm 110 is 140mm, same performance give or take

haha, too many numbers floating around in my head, I have been looking at the H110 and the H100i, so my question was pertaining to the H100i. My apologies tongue.gif.

I wish the H110 would fit, but I wont be able to install it without custom mounts. From what I have seen the H110 is slightly better in terms of noise due to the lower RPM fans.

I know the H100i will fit with room to spare, in push pull if I would like, the question is how much better will it perform for me than what I currently have.....

AFAIK I would avoid the H100 and H110 as the pump doesn't have enough strength to fully utilize the 2x 120mm rads much less 2x 140mm.

Besides an Ivy or Sandy doesn't need a dual rad as its TDP is fairly low.

A single 120 or 140 rad would be much better and cost a lot less.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835181030

This coming from a poor old sap who bought the H100.
Of course it also came with a free complimentary grinding issue.

The general rule is 120mm rad per 100w of power.
The TDP of i5-2500k is 95W and i5-3750k is 77W.

Edited by kennyparker1337 - 4/13/13 at 11:35am
post #5777 of 9531
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alphadan View Post

So, in my case, would you recommend setting the offset to a negative value? I find that the main culprit of the high temperatures when setting it to 4ghz is the high voltage levels... I kind of feel that having a +0.05 offset is letting the CPU run too freely when it comes to controlling the voltage, this is why I thought a fixed voltage would be better, and it has proved to be that so far...

I am really reluctant to keep the fixed voltage, so any recommendations you make will be greatly appreciated.

Cheers.

The way offset works, is it will add your specified value (.005v at this point) to your CPU based on your multiplier, this addition will be added to the VID voltage for that specified multi. Each multiplier will increase the default voltage incrementally, and the offset voltage is used to adjust the voltage you need to be stable. LLC will also impact this voltage immensely depending on what setting you use.

If your Vcore is too high with a given offset voltage, you can use negative offset to reduce it, you can do this by monitoring your CPUz Vcore value, or another utility that reports Vcore.
Edited by Mattb2e - 4/13/13 at 11:39am
post #5778 of 9531
Quote:
Originally Posted by kennyparker1337 View Post

AFAIK I would avoid the H100 and H110 as the pump doesn't have enough strength to fully utilize the 2x 120mm rads much less 2x 140mm.

Besides an Ivy or Sandy doesn't need a dual rad as its TDP is fairly low.

A single 120 or 140 rad would be much better and cost a lot less.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835181030

This coming from a poor old sap who bought the H100.
Of course it also came with a free complimentary grinding issue.

The general rule is 120mm rad per 100w of power.
The TDP of i5-2500k is 95W and i5-3750k is 77W.

The TDP isn't the issue, its the method in which Intel affixed the IHS to the CPU die. On Sandy, they solder the IHS to the die, which is what they have done for a seemingly long period of time. Speculatively, to reduce costs, they used a TIM to bridge the IHS and the CPU die on Ivy, which leads to unsatisfactory thermal transfer while overclocking. The more voltage you need, the hotter it gets.

While the cooler I have now was able to bring my somewhat average 2500k to 4.5ghz with relative ease, I cannot do that with my 3770k without hitting over 90C. The easiest solution would be to delid my processor, however I do not want to void the warranty, and I do not want to risk damaging the CPU. The easiest mode of improving my temps outside of delidding would be to buy a more efficient cooling solution. I have read through several reviews that the H100i has improved the flaws of the H100, and it seems as if it performs rather well. However I am aware that the pump is not as robust as a dedicated loop, or even the Swiftech H220.

Additionally, the 120mm corsair AIO coolers, or equivalents, are on par with high end air cooling. I would prefer to buy something that is somewhat better than high end air cooling, even if only by a small margin. The H100i is in the benchmarks I have read.
Edited by Mattb2e - 4/13/13 at 11:47am
post #5779 of 9531
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattb2e View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by kennyparker1337 View Post

AFAIK I would avoid the H100 and H110 as the pump doesn't have enough strength to fully utilize the 2x 120mm rads much less 2x 140mm.

Besides an Ivy or Sandy doesn't need a dual rad as its TDP is fairly low.

A single 120 or 140 rad would be much better and cost a lot less.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835181030

This coming from a poor old sap who bought the H100.
Of course it also came with a free complimentary grinding issue.

The general rule is 120mm rad per 100w of power.
The TDP of i5-2500k is 95W and i5-3750k is 77W.

The TDP isn't the issue, its the method in which Intel affixed the IHS to the CPU die. On Sandy, they solder the IHS to the die, which is what they have done for a seemingly long period of time. Speculatively, to reduce costs, they used a TIM to bridge the IHS and the CPU die on Ivy, which leads to unsatisfactory thermal transfer while overclocking. The more voltage you need, the hotter it gets.

While the cooler I have now was able to bring my somewhat average 2500k to 4.5ghz with relative ease, I cannot do that with my 3770k without hitting over 90C. The easiest solution would be to delid my processor, however I do not want to void the warranty, and I do not want to risk damaging the CPU. The easiest mode of improving my temps outside of delidding would be to buy a more efficient cooling solution. I have read through several reviews that the H100i has improved the flaws of the H100, and it seems as if it performs rather well. However I am aware that the pump is not as robust as a dedicated loop, or even the Swiftech H220.

Additionally, the 120mm corsair AIO coolers, or equivalents, are on par with high end air cooling. I would prefer to buy something that is somewhat better than high end air cooling, even if only by a small margin. The H100i is in the benchmarks I have read.

I doubt the H100i could be that much better than H100.

I can tell you from experience that the H100 was about the same, sometimes worse, as my Thermalright Venemous-X: Black Edition.

If you won't delid then your best option is: http://www.performance-pcs.com/catalog/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=59_202_972&products_id=34961

Slightly higher price than the H100i and it provides much much better cooling.

Don't forget that the ultimate problem is within the CPU and that is going to hurt temps on any cooler (meaning no matter what cooler you get, you will still have very high temps).
Edited by kennyparker1337 - 4/13/13 at 12:12pm
post #5780 of 9531
After following this guide along with Sin's guide on OCing ivy bridge I have run into a bit of a wall. The highest clock I am able to achieve is 4.7ghz, this is running ~1.52v. I have a custom loop and awesome ambient temps (15c) and this brings my load temps around 50c. I originally had some temp issues so I delidded and lapped the CPU which got me to where I am at now. I honestly cant recall what Volts I was running at before because I was more concerned about the temps. They werent as high as they are now though. The voltage is pretty high (especially considering the speed), which makes me think I went wrong somewhere. Ive attached pictures of my bios settings and a screenshot under load. If someone would be willing to give me a hand it would be appreciated. Thanks.

20130413_145054.jpg 1601k .jpg file
20130413_144405.jpg 1767k .jpg file
20130413_144451.jpg 1469k .jpg file
20130413_144516.jpg 1624k .jpg file
20130413_144535.jpg 1300k .jpg file
20130413_144608.jpg 1452k .jpg file
GameBox
(17 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
3770k Asus maximus v gene  GTX 680 Lightning 16GB Corsair Dominator Platinum 2800Mhz 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingCooling
Samsung 840 Pro x2 Raid 0 500Gb VelociRaptor  Alphacool VP655 Alphacool VP655 
CoolingCoolingOSKeyboard
Swiftech MCR220-XP Swiftech MCR220-XP Window 7 64 Razer Blackwidow Ultimate Stealth 
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
Corsair AX860i Mountain Mods H2Go Razer Deathadder 2013 Razer Invicta 
Audio
Astro A40 
  hide details  
Reply
GameBox
(17 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
3770k Asus maximus v gene  GTX 680 Lightning 16GB Corsair Dominator Platinum 2800Mhz 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingCooling
Samsung 840 Pro x2 Raid 0 500Gb VelociRaptor  Alphacool VP655 Alphacool VP655 
CoolingCoolingOSKeyboard
Swiftech MCR220-XP Swiftech MCR220-XP Window 7 64 Razer Blackwidow Ultimate Stealth 
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
Corsair AX860i Mountain Mods H2Go Razer Deathadder 2013 Razer Invicta 
Audio
Astro A40 
  hide details  
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Intel CPUs
Overclock.net › Forums › Intel › Intel CPUs › Complete Overclocking Guide: Sandy Bridge & Ivy Bridge | *ASRock Edition*