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Complete Overclocking Guide: Sandy Bridge & Ivy Bridge | *ASRock Edition* - Page 835

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Poll expired: Oct 17, 2012  
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post #8341 of 8347
is there a way to manually up the VCORE voltage or is it just supposed to be monitored as you go into higher cpu multipliers and higher boost voltages ?
post #8342 of 8347
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BAMFMF View Post

is there a way to manually up the VCORE voltage or is it just supposed to be monitored as you go into higher cpu multipliers and higher boost voltages ?

Only way to manually change Vcore is to set it to fixed voltage.
Otherwise the BIOS will use it's predetermined voltage for each multiplier - based on the VID table - and then apply the extra boost voltage when the CPU is under load.

One way you can overclock a system is by using fixed voltage to determine the voltage needed to run at a certain speed - for example 1.4v @ 4.5GHz.
Then you load up a program that tell's you the VID of your chip at 4.5GHz - for example 1.3v.
Then you can simply change the system to boost voltage and apply a 0.1v boost to the voltage.

The system will load the 1.3v as normal based on the VID table and then apply the extra 0.1 voltage to get you 1.4v during load.
Edited by kennyparker1337 - Yesterday at 11:09 am
post #8343 of 8347
Quote:
Originally Posted by kennyparker1337 View Post

Only way to manually change Vcore is to set it to fixed voltage.
Otherwise the BIOS will use it's predetermined voltage for each multiplier - based on the VID table - and then apply the extra boost voltage when the CPU is under load.

One way you can overclock a system is by using fixed voltage to determine the voltage needed to run at a certain speed - for example 1.4v @ 4.5GHz.
Then you load up a program that tell's you the VID of your chip at 4.5GHz - for example 1.3v.
Then you can simply change the system to boost voltage and apply a 0.1v boost to the voltage.

The system will load the 1.3v as normal based on the VID table and then apply the extra 0.1 voltage to get you 1.4v during load.

so then i don't have to set my vcore manually, i can just keep boosting my CPU multiplier and boost voltage and my vcore voltage will increase alongside it? i only asked because i keep upping the cpu multiplier (my 3570k runs at 3.4 and right now i have it at 4.6 and the vcore voltage max is at 1.216 so i just didn't know if i was doing something wrong)

so if I've done everything correctly i should be able to keep boosting my cpu multiplier by quite a bit before i reach my Vcore max voltage?

my question wasn't so much as can i edit the max vcore voltage as much as if i keep doing this the way I'm doing it will my Vcore voltage go up or am i doing something wrong.

as far as i can tell you seem to recommend not messing with the vcore voltage directly, but rather just upping the cpu multiplier and boost voltage until you see a max range close to 1.5v in HW monitor

or am i missing something...
post #8344 of 8347
Quote:
Originally Posted by BAMFMF View Post

so then i don't have to set my vcore manually, i can just keep boosting my CPU multiplier and boost voltage and my vcore voltage will increase alongside it? i only asked because i keep upping the cpu multiplier (my 3570k runs at 3.4 and right now i have it at 4.6 and the vcore voltage max is at 1.216 so i just didn't know if i was doing something wrong)

so if I've done everything correctly i should be able to keep boosting my cpu multiplier by quite a bit before i reach my Vcore max voltage?

my question wasn't so much as can i edit the max vcore voltage as much as if i keep doing this the way I'm doing it will my Vcore voltage go up or am i doing something wrong.

as far as i can tell you seem to recommend not messing with the vcore voltage directly, but rather just upping the cpu multiplier and boost voltage until you see a max range close to 1.5v in HW monitor

or am i missing something...

basically i'm on your "getting closer" tab and i'm just scared ****less i'm going to burn out some hardware
post #8345 of 8347
Quote:
Originally Posted by kennyparker1337 View Post

Only way to manually change Vcore is to set it to fixed voltage.
Otherwise the BIOS will use it's predetermined voltage for each multiplier - based on the VID table - and then apply the extra boost voltage when the CPU is under load.

One way you can overclock a system is by using fixed voltage to determine the voltage needed to run at a certain speed - for example 1.4v @ 4.5GHz.
Then you load up a program that tell's you the VID of your chip at 4.5GHz - for example 1.3v.
Then you can simply change the system to boost voltage and apply a 0.1v boost to the voltage.

The system will load the 1.3v as normal based on the VID table and then apply the extra 0.1 voltage to get you 1.4v during load.

also, when i monitor the cpu temps with hwmonitor am i watching the individual core temps or rather the package temp.

sorry for all the noob questions
post #8346 of 8347
Thread Starter 
No damage will be done as long as you don't go over 1.5 volts.
Temperature will not damage the components. They will shut off before damage can be done with temperature.
You should be paying attention to Core Temps and the highest one.

If you are running the test and you see 1.4v and you fail then you increase the boost voltage by 0.01v then when you test again if should read around 1.41v.

It's plenty fine to test overclocks with the boost method.
Raising the multiplier isn't going raise the Vcore very much.
Edited by kennyparker1337 - Yesterday at 2:53 pm
post #8347 of 8347
cool thanks!
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