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Complete Overclocking Guide: Sandy Bridge & Ivy Bridge | *ASRock Edition* - Page 92

Poll Results: Was this guide helpful?

Poll expired: Oct 17, 2012  
  • 80% (237)
    Yes (and I DO have an ASRock motherboard).
  • 15% (45)
    Yes (but I DO NOT have an ASRock motherboard).
  • 2% (7)
    No (and I DO have an ASRock motherboard).
  • 2% (7)
    No (but I DO NOT have an ASRock motherboard).
296 Total Votes  
post #911 of 9489
Quote:
Originally Posted by zaodrze244 View Post

alright all the confusion arises from the fact that I am using a translator so let's start again cheers.gif

Whatever the merits of your arguments, hats off, and translate that smile.gif for trying to sort all this out using a translator. I doubt there are many of us here visiting forums where languages other than English are used.

marty
post #912 of 9489
Quote:
Originally Posted by zaodrze244 View Post

longest time tested approximately 10 h in the blend mode with no errors. never sought errors in the Windows Event Viewer and I bet that the vast majority of them there is not looking: P moreover, in the guide in the first post is not about words.
quicker and easier path is to play in BF3 than waiting 12 hours for Prime95 if the end result is not 100% sure in the presence of the other.
from my experience in testing based on the BF 3 shows that the very launch of the game entering the borderland 5min charts and gives 90% confidence that the Processor is stabiliny a given setting. errors, of course, also come after a long game but if someone turns up and is looking for a quick answer whether the setting is good to BF3 to this ideal. BF3 besides the CPU does not heat to temperatures that turns into a liquid
a prime 27.7 blend test for 12+hr with checking for whea errors is still a better way to test for stability than BF3 though, im guessing something like bf3 could work but you would have to have the graphics cards to cap out your cpu or set the reso/settings to very low to maintain 100% cpu usage. prime pretty much does that on its own.
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Intel Core i5 760 Asus P7p55d-e LX(RMA) MSI Nvidia 9800gtx+ Corsair dominator 2x2gb 1600mhz 7-7-7-18  
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post #913 of 9489
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by zaodrze244 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by kennyparker1337 View Post


alright all the confusion arises from the fact that I am using a translator so let's start again cheers.gif

Like I said I tested the new version of Prime95 you speak, moreover, taken from the link in the first post and continue to uphold that to obtain stability in Prime95 CPU requires much less power than I need (not just me) to give to the processor was stable in games especially in BF3. for example, Skyrim, gta4, risen 2, The Witcher 2 requires only a little higher voltage than Prime95, but the rise of flight such needs as much as BF3.

in conclusion I believe that is suitable for Prime95 test for 15-20 min to check the maximum temperature that can happen during a specific cpu load but does not translate into a 24/7 stability, which, after all this searching.
Quote:
Originally Posted by kennyparker1337 View Post

Prime95 works by finding Mersenne prime numbers which is an operation independent of what CPU you use. You can't claim that it works less on a Sandy / Ivy. It works the same as it did on previous gens.

These new gen chips do have new instruction sets to enable more performance but that does not make Prime95 any less useful. But this point is minute, because Prime95 just got update to 27.7 which included this...

description is of course alright encouraged to believe that this is so and it should be, however, my experience confirm that it is not, unfortunately. I will not say I'd rather fire up Prime95 for 12 hours or even 24 to be 100% certain that my computer is stable but implementation is verified in a drastic way in which the above described manner. I suggest you check these my "stories" and can then change your mind and admit I was right.


us to fully understand my statements are not intended to wreak havoc here, but I want to give you my experience in terms of stability tests ivy. My previous platform was lynfild with him I had no such problems. what you have set for the test in Prime95 gave me a guarantee of 24/7 stability in all. moreover, the stability of perfectly bare lynfild lynx, whose 50 was enough for the loop to find a 24/7 stability in all applications including BF3: P

There was no problem with your translator. Your ideas were conveyed pretty nice.

The problem is you could have asked a simple question (below) and it would have probably been answered. Instead you spout out a bunch of things that don't make much since.

Why does BF3 require slighty more CPU voltage than prime95?
Well first I would like to point out that, out of the hundreds of overclocks, you are the first person I ever heard report this issue.

Second, I would tell you that like most people, perhaps you used the standard blend mode? Custom blend can be used to use much more memory in testing, as the BF3 would use much more than a standard blend test.

Third, the difference of your voltages was 0.05v. That is not a lot of voltage. Perhaps the actual CPU voltage reported in CPU-Z (most definitely not 100% accurate) was off by that much during testing?

Lastly, passing even 12 hours on prime95 does not provide you with 100% stability. You still would have a chance to crash on BF3. But the question is not do I have 100% stability (which can never truely be achieved) but how close can I get to that 100%. I feel for the purposes of my guide, that it does get you extremely close to that 100. But again, every system is different and out of the hundreds/thousands of overclocks.. one is bound to find fault in my guide and require more tuning.


I know you didn't mean to cause havoc, but you did (at least for me) when you jumped to conclusions. There are many possible answers to your question, many of which that do not make prime95 "crap".
Quote:
prime ... is crap and do[es] not show the true stability of overclocked CPU
the prime you only have to check the maximum temperatures that can occur during strong CPU and the end of its usefulness

Simply not true.

thumb.gif (Please remember this is just a forum. Everyone, myself included, must remember to not take things personally. redface.gif)
post #914 of 9489
I would like to say that this guide including the tests suggested didn't give me any kind of crash in hours of rendering simulation. My 2600k runs around 12 hours 100%cpu usage everyday, it only drops cpu use when it has to write 3gb of sim data file, while 70%-80% of my 16gb of ram is in use. So, thank you for this guide.
post #915 of 9489
Thank you for the time and effort you put in to this guide. I will be upgrading to Sandy, either 2500k or 2600k, from a Q6600 platform so this will help me familiarize myself with the Sandy arena. +rep!
post #916 of 9489
Quote:
Originally Posted by rumkingpin View Post

Thank you for the time and effort you put in to this guide. I will be upgrading to Sandy, either 2500k or 2600k, from a Q6600 platform so this will help me familiarize myself with the Sandy arena. +rep!

I got my i5 2500K sandy just before ivy came out, but I have no regrets. simply an awesome chip. Got my son an HP laptop with a mobile i7. Again, no regrets, as ivy really seems to be more of a manufacturing improvement rather than any significant performance improvement, and I've read about heat issues with ivy, not sure if that is still going on.

marty
post #917 of 9489
I have known that there is a functionality called Intelligent Energy Saver that can affect stability in overclcok, where i can find this in bios?
post #918 of 9489
Hi Guys
I'm running into a roadblock with overclocking with this guide.

I've managed to overclock the 2500k at 4.5ghz with no error on P95 for 20 minutes. The temperature averages 67 degrees on Blend at Priority 10, with a vcore of 1.344-1.352v.

http://valid.canardpc.com/show_oc.php?id=2430629

When i increase the multiplier from 45 to 46 the computer is unable to start up and freezes on the "windows is starting up" page.
I followed the guide and increased the turbo voltage to +0.012 which isnt helping...

Any thoughts on what the problem could be??

Motherboard: Z77 Extreme 4
Cooler: Hyper 212

Thanks!
Edited by rubberducky12 - 7/6/12 at 5:30am
post #919 of 9489
I also have the similar problem with rubberducky12. My computer freezes on windows startup loading splash screen once I set the multiplier to 45. I tried increasing vcore offset, turbo voltage offset and adjusting the CPU PLL voltage to the suggested values . Can someone share how you overcame this problem? Thank you.
post #920 of 9489
Quote:
Originally Posted by rubberducky12 View Post

Hi Guys
I'm running into a roadblock with overclocking with this guide.
I've managed to overclock the 2500k at 4.5ghz with no error on P95 for 20 minutes. The temperature averages 67 degrees on Blend at Priority 10, with a vcore of 1.344-1.352v.
http://valid.canardpc.com/show_oc.php?id=2430629
When i increase the multiplier from 45 to 46 the computer is unable to start up and freezes on the "windows is starting up" page.
I followed the guide and increased the turbo voltage to +0.012 which isnt helping...
Any thoughts on what the problem could be??
Motherboard: Z77 Extreme 4
Cooler: Hyper 212
Thanks!

Quote:
Originally Posted by carinae View Post

I also have the similar problem with rubberducky12. My computer freezes on windows startup loading splash screen once I set the multiplier to 45. I tried increasing vcore offset, turbo voltage offset and adjusting the CPU PLL voltage to the suggested values . Can someone share how you overcame this problem? Thank you.

When you get up to 4.5 gHz+, the next step in turbo voltage will not stabilize your system. If your computer fails to boot after increasing the turbo voltage offset by 1 step up, you will have to increase your turbo voltage again until your system can boot into Windows.
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