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Mouse testing software - Page 4

post #31 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Axaion View Post

Its to check if your mousepad is attached to the table, and if not, it glues your chair to the ceiling
I see intriguing biggrin.gif
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post #32 of 67
edit
Edited by nlmiller0015 - 12/11/13 at 10:18am
Gaming Setup
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Intel Core i7 2700K Z77 Extreme6 Intel HD Graphics 3000 (GT2+) NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 3GB 
RAMHard DriveCoolingOS
CORSAIR Vengeance 16 GB  OCZ 120GB Vertex 3 SATA COOLER MASTER Hyper 212 EVO  Windows 8.1 64 Bit 
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Benq XL2420TE Razer Blackwidow 2014 Thermaltake Smart M 850W Power Supply COOLER MASTER HAF XM RC-922XM-KKN1 Latch Side P... 
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Deathadder 2013 SteelSeries QCK + Astro A40 2013 
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Gaming Setup
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CPUMotherboardGraphicsGraphics
Intel Core i7 2700K Z77 Extreme6 Intel HD Graphics 3000 (GT2+) NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 3GB 
RAMHard DriveCoolingOS
CORSAIR Vengeance 16 GB  OCZ 120GB Vertex 3 SATA COOLER MASTER Hyper 212 EVO  Windows 8.1 64 Bit 
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Benq XL2420TE Razer Blackwidow 2014 Thermaltake Smart M 850W Power Supply COOLER MASTER HAF XM RC-922XM-KKN1 Latch Side P... 
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post #33 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaximilianKohler View Post

Does anyone else use Avast? I'm wondering why I'm the only one having problems with it...

I used it in the past. But since starting from version 9.0 it slowed down the windows 7 start and program start, I switched to avira antivir free.
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redeemer
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LG GP57ES40 selfbuilt water cooling Windows 10 Professional 64 Bit LG 34UC97C 
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post #34 of 67
Quote (Click to show)
Quote:
Originally Posted by microe View Post

MouseTester.zip 146k .zip file


I wrote this to be a simple mouse testing software that improves on the existing tools. It has built-in plotting, CSV save and load, and plot export to PNG capability.

It uses an open source (MIT License) plotting library called OxyPlot that can be found here: http://oxyplot.codeplex.com/.

Uses the MS .NET 4 Framework. You will need to have this framework installed to run.

Built-in plotting includes:
raw counts vs time = for detecting limited data paths and skipping counts (e.g. 8-bit reporting that caps at +/- 127)
update time per report = for detecting unstable polling rates (on my system it can do 1 ms reliably, YMMV)
velocity vs time (calculated based on cpi) = for tracking speed type measurements
raw X-Y count plotting = for acceleration, jitter, and angle snapping testing, plots a path based on raw counts

I'm impressed. Great testing tool.

+REP
post #35 of 67
post #36 of 67
Microe could u make a video, is it possible from the graphs to see mouse smoothing, prediction, acceleration. Ty!
post #37 of 67
Thanks for the great program microe.
I used your program in my g100s review.
post #38 of 67
could i ask the best way to use your program? and the expecting testing procedures.
also, post testing, how do we make sense of the graphs? be good to understand those basics
post #39 of 67
First, specify the resolution of the mouse by either typing in a value or by clicking the Measure button and following the instructions in the text box at the bottom. Helpful hint, the program does not intercept clicks or movements from the system so I usually just click in the text box area when starting the data collection.

Second, collect some mouse data by clicking the Collect button and following the instructions in the text box at the bottom.

After that you can Plot the data you have collected using the specified cpi for calculations.

You can also save and load your data to .csv for future reference or importing into other programs like excel or [R] etc...

As far as the plots are concerned, first thing I do is window the data (to hide the garbage at the beginning and end of the collection) using the Data Point Start and Data Point End. From there it depends on the movement that was recorded. Here are some examples:

Count vs. Time: This is for looking at the raw counts from the mouse. The line is a moving average of the data and is provided as a general reference to gauge the consistency of the reporting from the mouse. For a mouse that does not loose tracking you will see the counts generally bouncing above and below the line without much deviation. If the counts deviate too much from the line then the mouse tracking may not appear smooth. If the mouse looses tracking then you will see the counts go erratic. You can also sometimes see angle snapping / prediction here (the counts will go to zero and hold there even though you moved the mouse with a slight arc). You can also see data path clipping here if the data plateaus at a fixed value (e.g. 127 for 8-bit mice). If the mouse is performing some form of multiplication for cpi boosting then you may be able to see that here as skipped counting steps.

Velocity vs. Time: This uses the time interval between updates, the cpi, and the counts to calculate the velocity of the mouse movement. Using fast swipes you can try to get the malfunction rate of the mouse here. Just like Counts vs. Time going erratic, when the tracking is lost the velocity goes erratic as well.

Interval vs. Time: This is for checking the consistency of the update rate from the mouse (i.e. 1000 Hz mouse updates every 1 ms).

X vs. Y: This is just plotting the data that you collected as a path. Like paint testing you can draw arbitrary shapes and see the exact raw mouse reports (e.g. jitter, angle snapping, stair stepping, etc...). Arbitrary movements can be used for acceleration and accuracy testing using this kind of plot as well. For example accuracy can be tested by starting from some point "A", moving the mouse (e.g. varying speed / angles) and then returning to point A. You should see the path that you moved the mouse along with the start and end points being roughly the same. You can do fast swipe / slow swipe back to the same point movements for acceleration testing. You can also do things like move the mouse in a bunch of circles and seeing if the path drifts away.

I hope this helps.
post #40 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by microe View Post

First, specify the resolution of the mouse by either typing in a value or by clicking the Measure button and following the instructions in the text box at the bottom. Helpful hint, the program does not intercept clicks or movements from the system so I usually just click in the text box area when starting the data collection.

Second, collect some mouse data by clicking the Collect button and following the instructions in the text box at the bottom.

After that you can Plot the data you have collected using the specified cpi for calculations.

You can also save and load your data to .csv for future reference or importing into other programs like excel or [R] etc...

As far as the plots are concerned, first thing I do is window the data (to hide the garbage at the beginning and end of the collection) using the Data Point Start and Data Point End. From there it depends on the movement that was recorded. Here are some examples:

Count vs. Time: This is for looking at the raw counts from the mouse. The line is a moving average of the data and is provided as a general reference to gauge the consistency of the reporting from the mouse. For a mouse that does not loose tracking you will see the counts generally bouncing above and below the line without much deviation. If the counts deviate too much from the line then the mouse tracking may not appear smooth. If the mouse looses tracking then you will see the counts go erratic. You can also sometimes see angle snapping / prediction here (the counts will go to zero and hold there even though you moved the mouse with a slight arc). You can also see data path clipping here if the data plateaus at a fixed value (e.g. 127 for 8-bit mice). If the mouse is performing some form of multiplication for cpi boosting then you may be able to see that here as skipped counting steps.

Velocity vs. Time: This uses the time interval between updates, the cpi, and the counts to calculate the velocity of the mouse movement. Using fast swipes you can try to get the malfunction rate of the mouse here. Just like Counts vs. Time going erratic, when the tracking is lost the velocity goes erratic as well.

Interval vs. Time: This is for checking the consistency of the update rate from the mouse (i.e. 1000 Hz mouse updates every 1 ms).

X vs. Y: This is just plotting the data that you collected as a path. Like paint testing you can draw arbitrary shapes and see the exact raw mouse reports (e.g. jitter, angle snapping, stair stepping, etc...). Arbitrary movements can be used for acceleration and accuracy testing using this kind of plot as well. For example accuracy can be tested by starting from some point "A", moving the mouse (e.g. varying speed / angles) and then returning to point A. You should see the path that you moved the mouse along with the start and end points being roughly the same. You can do fast swipe / slow swipe back to the same point movements for acceleration testing. You can also do things like move the mouse in a bunch of circles and seeing if the path drifts away.

I hope this helps.

seems to be a great allround analysis software!
if you know how to use it, you seem to be able to learn a lot about your mouse.
thanks for this explanation! +rep thumb.gif
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