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Making a Homemade Test Bench - Just for Fun

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I went to the computer store this evening looking for the cheapest computer case I could find. I wasn't going to read any reviews on it, take into the account the maker or model, I was just going to buy the cheapest I could find.

What I ended up with was a ATX 2000B by Raidmax. It doesn't really matter the make or model, because I was just going to tear it apart to make myself a homemade test bench. Mainly for the fun of it, and also because I need somewhere to put my computer parts once I take my other case and send it off to get painted.

I'm looking for advice, opinions, whatever you have to say about this. I want to take this cheap case, take a few parts from it, and make it as smooth of a bench as possible. For under $50 in parts. (So I have a $25 budget).

Wanna help? Let's discuss!


A nondescript box with a case I've never heard of. Maybe it's the tequila talking but I'm guessing it's going to be total junk.
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What was weird is once I opened it, it wasn't as bad as I imagined. It's not grand, but it's not what I was expecting for $20. It was nicer.
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Just a few tools...
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Fifteen minutes later I had this:
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Add a little primer...
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I put my first coat of primer on there.
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Notes so far:

While the parts are sturdier than I thought they would be I know I need to reinforce them a little. I was thinking of making the bench look something like this: (I apologize for the very, very poor job in Paint)

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Materials I have around:
* Wood
* Max Metal
* Perhaps some acrylic
Edited by Asininity - 2/6/12 at 9:46pm
post #2 of 12
I'll watch wink.gif

is it just me or is the hole in that mobo tray oddly placed?
post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 
Ooooh, good. Stalk me please rolleyes.gif.

It probably is, a little. I'm not so sure on the design at the moment. I'm thinking a two story though. The top to put the mobo and a shelf right bellow it for the PSU, optical driver, hard drives, etc.
post #4 of 12
Id actually put the support on the board tray and the back pannel rather than the back pannel to the shelving. This way you can move it in parts. Its a really good idea i think ill sub this and see how it goes.
Finally Finished!
(14 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i7 3930K Batch: 3135B495T Gigabyte X79 UD7 GTX 570 3-way SLi Corsair Vengeance 1600mhz CL9 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
60GB OCZ Vertex II / 3x 500GB Samsung Spinpoint EK Supreme HF Nickel, EK DCP4.0, Stealth GT 360... Windows 7 Ult 64bit Acer 22" G225HQ 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Razor Lacosa Mirror Edition Silverstone Strider 1500w  Aerocool X-Preditor  CM Storm Sentinel Advanced 
Mouse Pad
Razer Goliathus Speed edition 
  hide details  
Reply
Finally Finished!
(14 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i7 3930K Batch: 3135B495T Gigabyte X79 UD7 GTX 570 3-way SLi Corsair Vengeance 1600mhz CL9 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
60GB OCZ Vertex II / 3x 500GB Samsung Spinpoint EK Supreme HF Nickel, EK DCP4.0, Stealth GT 360... Windows 7 Ult 64bit Acer 22" G225HQ 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Razor Lacosa Mirror Edition Silverstone Strider 1500w  Aerocool X-Preditor  CM Storm Sentinel Advanced 
Mouse Pad
Razer Goliathus Speed edition 
  hide details  
Reply
post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 
Kal777: Yes, I think I'm going to that instead. Thank you! Time to find some L brace things...

I'm thinking of pulling out the Dremel and cutting away the outlined portions:

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post #6 of 12
I would leave the IO plate slot so you can have a shield back there, you don't wanna end up fumbling around trying to plug in your USB whatever at 2 am and accidentally short something...

(may or may not be speaking from personal experience) tongue.gif

definitely trim it up some though, maybe cut out the fan space if you don't think you will use it.
post #7 of 12
Thread Starter 
I realized after using the Dremel that the little piece of metal on the right side of the I/O was very weak and I accidentally bent it severely while working on it. So I cut it away after realizing the metal was far too thin to salvage it.

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Now I've been looking around a bit at people's homemade benches and I have yet to find a great solution for a I/O plate. An option I'm thinking of is leaving the pack plate off, and using and USB ports that came on the case for popping stuff in and out.

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Above: Microphone, headphones, x2 USB 2.0, reset, power switch.
Edited by Asininity - 1/18/12 at 6:15am
post #8 of 12
Excellent! I chopped up a very old case from circa. 2001 to use the motherboard tray as a temporary caseless solution while I was modding my old P193. I was considering a project like this, but I just don't have the sheer willpower to do it. Good luck!
post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 
audioxbliss Thank you! I was actually hoping to use a old computer case, they're generally a lot tougher and thicker. I'm going to look around for someone with a dead computer over the next few weeks to find one that's a little stronger thicker metal. Try it out, it's really not been but a little bit of work.

(Camera photos, eh) I painted the tray, but I'm going to have to go back, sand it down, clean it, and have another go with the paint. I'm thinking black next go.
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I think this used to be from a counter, but I thought it would work well. It's pretty tough too.
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And it became this...
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I'm not sure what I'm going to do for the bottom shelf.
post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 
First of all, I took some time to make something to eat.
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Now I'm hungry all over again. Anyways.

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Obviously I have some work to do, but it's getting there.

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