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How does my ram affect my CPU OC

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
Simple question

Does faster memory/ tighter timings allow for higher OC?

If not is a reason not to just use value ram.

Just ordered the Asus Sabertooth 990fx and now i gotta upgrade to ddr3 biggrin.gif

Thanks!
Edited by Cloudpost - 1/22/12 at 9:44pm
post #2 of 8

Faster memory with tighter timings usually hints at better binned memory that has better overclocking flexibility; which, when working with multiplier locked processors such as your 1055T (where bus clock - and RAM clock as a result - have to be pushed; and there may be limited RAM multiplier choices) is Crucial.


Don't pair value 1333 CL9 RAM with your 1055T, or you won't easily reach 4Ghz with the setup.  Value 1333 CL9/1066 CL7/etc RAM usually makes use of grab bag, low binned ICs that do not overclock well and can hold back the entire system overclock as a result.  Look for a DDR3-1600 kit MINIMUM with a 1055T - DDR3-1600 CL9 is already a huge step above 1333 CL9 in binning/capabilities.  Actually at the 286-300Mhz bus clock required for 4Ghz RAM multiplier x5.33 gives you about perfect 1520-1600Mhz RAM operation.

post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 
thats great information. I knew there is a reason why some ram is more expensive then others, just needed the proof.

what about BE processors where they can just raise the cpu multiplier . Is fast/tight ram important then?
post #4 of 8
Density or RAM effects the OC as well.

4x2GB sticks will hold back your CPU OC more than 2x4GB sticks will.
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post #5 of 8

^ This is true to some extent.  On processors such as E0 rev Phenom II x4 and x6 and FX series with robust IMCs it does not make so much of a difference in the CPU OC capability.  Hardly any at all, actually, as long as you can get it stable.

 

Fast/tight RAM is not as important for BE processors in the sense of overclocking capabilities with multiplier only, although most choose to enable efficient bus clock-multi combinations and it is best to get a decent performance-binned kit for flexibility when it comes to that.  There are certain apps and tasks (i.e. BF3, video editing, if you are running an SSD or RAMdisk) that are somewhat more bandwidth intensive and will also really benefit from faster speed/tighter timings; benefits are otherwise smaller and often intangible.  It is cheaper and more effective, however, to take a locked multi processor and slightly more expensive RAM (or not at all, most DDR3-1600 kits can reach 1333 kit price on sales) than a more expensive unlocked multi with cheaper RAM - if the locked multi processor has similar OC capabilities.  And many 1055Ts do actually OC as well as their older brothers the 1090T and 1100T.

post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cloudpost View Post

thats great information. I knew there is a reason why some ram is more expensive then others, just needed the proof.
what about BE processors where they can just raise the cpu multiplier . Is fast/tight ram important then?

Actually we do not know that more expensive RAM OC's better than value RAM of the same rated frequency. It may or may not. Many people have been very successful OC'ing value RAM. Often value RAM uses the identical ICs but a plain Jane heat sink outer shell. Those fancy top mounted heat sinks cost more so a mfg. charges more. And because they look "sexy" to some folks the RAM mfg. can charge a significant premium over value RAM - which may perform identical.

Unfortunately with DDR3 RAM neither the frequency nor the latencies make any tangible improvement in system performance unless you are able to double the frequency which few folks are actually able to do. Then you might see 2-3% system improvement, might? The only exception to this is AMD APUs which do benefit from faster RAM frequency as both the CPU and GPU use the faster frequency.

1600 MHz. RAM seems to be the price and performance sweet spot at the moment. You won't know if 1600 value or expensive RAM will OC better or the same unless you actually test numerous RAM kits to see. Though there is no system performance gain to speak of the FX CPUs use 1866 MHz. RAM by default but can also run slower RAM without issue. Many 1600 MHz. rated DIMMs will also run at 1866 MHz. on an FX CPU.

Since there is little to nothing to be gained from OC'ing the RAM but a lot to be gained by OC'ing the CPU clockspeed, then many folks leave the RAM frequency close to the default OE RAM frequency and up the CPU clockspeed for best performance. In OC'ing what works for one person is not necessarily what works for another. The fun of OC'ing is finding out what works best for your given hardware. More expensive RAM does not guarantee that you can OC your CPU any higher than value RAM.

Enjoy ! thumb.gif
Edited by AMD4ME - 1/23/12 at 11:28am
post #7 of 8

There are also strains of ICs that are actually able to put on value 1333/etc RAM because they can run the low end value RAM specs - but not much more.  The result is inflexible generic memory that doesn't OC with the bus clock well and can hold the system back and be a real pain in the neck.  It's happened quite a lot before here as well.

 

I wouldn't take the risk.  Getting a kit of 1600Mhz RAM that you know will run at 1600Mhz is still the easiest and most practical solution for the Phenom II x6 1055T because at the 286-300Mhz bus clocks required for ~4Ghz operation you can run your RAM at approximately the 1600Mhz it's rated for - no complication necessary, just use the x5.33 memory multiplier.  The gap between 1333Mhz and 1600Mhz is nothing like the gap between 1600Mhz in 1866Mhz - if speaking in terms of RAM IC binning and performance capability.


Edited by xd_1771 - 1/23/12 at 1:28pm
post #8 of 8
As I suggested 1600 MHz. RAM is currently the sweet spot. We don't know however if 1600 MHz. premium RAM will allow the CPU to OC any better than 1600 MHz. value RAM without actually testing. For the most part the RAM and it's operating frequency are not the controlling factor in a CPU's overclocking ability.
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