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{Guide} Create a Gaming Virtual Machine - Page 35

post #341 of 824
Quote:
Originally Posted by N0BOX View Post

VMWare Workstation doesn't support VT-d, but you could have a Windows 7 host (on which you install your graphics-intensive applications/games) and boot your other Linux/Windows guests in Workstation. This is how my machine is currently configured. I have a Windows 7 Ultimate x64 host with 32GB of memory, and I always boot a Linux Mint 13 x64 guest when I start the machine up. The Mint guest runs MythTV for me (thank the electronic gods for the HDHomeRun tuners!) among other fun linuxy applications. I also have a Win 7 Home Premium VM and a few Linux VMs of various distributions that I spin up for short periods of time depending on what I need to do.
I would prefer to have a Windows 7 Ultimate x64 and Mint Linux 14 x64 VM running on Xen than having to depend on the stability of Windows and VMWare Workstation to get my TV shows recorded by MythTV on my Mint VM. Until I get the chance to shuffle around several terabytes worth of data, that's just the way things are going to have to stay.

Looks like a nice setup, though I've lost my trust in Windows and would not want to run Windows as primary OS. You can use Samba to share disks between dom0 and domU, perhaps it solves the issue of shuffling around lots of data.

On the other hand, I transfered my entire photo collection (~2 TB) from several native NTFS drives to a striped LVM volume consisting of 2 2TB drives accessed from within the Windows domU. It wasn't much of an effort, but requires spare HDs.
post #342 of 824
Quote:
Originally Posted by N0BOX View Post

The reason your new disk doesn't show up in Explorer is because it hasn't yet been partitioned and formatted. What you need to do is go to the Control Panel, open Computer Management, and then select the Disk Management option in the panel on the left. This will bring up a graphical representation of all the disks you have attached to your Windows machine. You can select the new disk, partition it, format it to NTFS, and optionally set a drive letter and volume name of your choosing for it. Once it is formatted, it will show up in Explorer.

You hit the nail on the top! I totally forgot that part in my reply.
post #343 of 824
Quote:
Originally Posted by dizzy4 View Post

I am still looking into getting disks ported to windows, but it is a long term goal. The way Qemu handles the disks is different than the way windows natively handles it, so it is a little daunting. I assume the best way to port over storage disks is to set up a samba share from the dom0. That way you don't have to reformat and lose data. Unfortunately I don't think this will work for system disks. There is supposedly a way to get system disks to work by installing the pv-ops drivers before trying to port it to a virtual machine then changing some boot sectors.

Samba is one option, but you may want to try kpartx under Linux. Here is a short howto I wrote: http://forums.linuxmint.com/viewtopic.php?f=42&t=111783. There is really nothing much to it.

See also the second post - a short script to backup your Windows domU.
post #344 of 824
Double posted.
Edited by powerhouse - 12/8/12 at 12:41pm
post #345 of 824
hi all !

I saw that thread and decided to post my experience in virtualization.

When I bought my PC a year ago, I've also searched on VT-d ready hardware. But that's quite hard to get.

First of all, you have to get wether a Xeon or a non-K CPU. That removes the fun you get when overclocking and running an overclocked PC. Sure, it guarantees you the most stable and the highest reliability ever, but you have to think it twice. Getting 1 GHz overclock on Sandy/Ivy Bridge CPU is common and the performance gain is not negligeable.

Second, you have to get the motherboard that is actually VT-d ready. This is another story. In fact, motherboard supporting this feature are rare. When I was looking for that, only the Intel Q Express chipset supported the VT-d since it is business oriented chipset. OR, I could get the Asus C206/C216 P8B/P8C WS motherboard. once again, no overclocking, standard workstation class motherboard, no cool feature. Only a motherboard thats works and performs normally, anything extraordinary here.

So, with all this, I ended up with a P8P67 WS Revolution and Core i7 2700K. No VT-d, but 1 GHz overclocking, magnificient power efficiency and general system stability, a huge board with which you can have fun, overclock, and build a powerhouse machine on it.

I mainly use VMWare Workstation for virtualization purpose. I haven't tried Xen yet, but I think it is an hypervisor in the same style of VMWare ESXi right ? Anyway, I'm used with VMWare Workstation and barely know it by hearth.

So that was my two cents smile.gif
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post #346 of 824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost26 View Post

hi all !
I saw that thread and decided to post my experience in virtualization.
When I bought my PC a year ago, I've also searched on VT-d ready hardware. But that's quite hard to get.
First of all, you have to get wether a Xeon or a non-K CPU. That removes the fun you get when overclocking and running an overclocked PC.

There is always the option of the C2-stepping Sandy Bridge-E chips (i7-3820, i7-3930K, i7-3960X). They all support VT-d, and they all support overclocking (the 3820 isn't "unlocked", but it's multiplier is "partially unlocked"... it allows you to go to a certain point, but not near as far as the "K" and "X" chips).

I have the i7-3930K, and my Asus P9X79 Deluxe motherboard supports VT-d. The way I understand it, many of the X79 chipset boards do support VT-d. These are the perfect boards and chips for consumer virtualization, especially if you go for the full 64GB or 96GB of RAM that some of the boards support and use the 6-core (12-thread / 12 vCPU) chips.
post #347 of 824
Quote:
Originally Posted by N0BOX View Post

The reason your new disk doesn't show up in Explorer is because it hasn't yet been partitioned and formatted. What you need to do is go to the Control Panel, open Computer Management, and then select the Disk Management option in the panel on the left. This will bring up a graphical representation of all the disks you have attached to your Windows machine. You can select the new disk, partition it, format it to NTFS, and optionally set a drive letter and volume name of your choosing for it. Once it is formatted, it will show up in Explorer.

I've tried that. I get a "The request could not be performed because of an I/O device error." Searching online yields two answers: get a new power adapter or replace the disk. Neither one makes sense in this context tongue.gif
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post #348 of 824
Quote:
Originally Posted by nyxcharon View Post

I've tried that. I get a "The request could not be performed because of an I/O device error." Searching online yields two answers: get a new power adapter or replace the disk. Neither one makes sense in this context tongue.gif

Can you share the config file line? Example:
Code:
disk = [ 'phy:/dev/mapper/lm13-win7,hda,w' , 'phy:/dev/mapper/photos-photo1_stripe,hdb,w' , 'phy:/dev/mapper/photos-photos_raw,hdc,w' ]

If I recall correctly, the disk shouldn't be formatted (NO file system) once you're done with the lvcreate command (I assume you use LVM).

EDIT: You mentioned you used virt-manager. I never used it for creating/editing a VM. I find it easier to edit the /etc/xen/win7.cfg or whatever file directly (see code above). Make a backup copy of the config file, to be save.

EDIT2: What is your hardware?
Edited by powerhouse - 12/9/12 at 12:25am
post #349 of 824
Quote:
Originally Posted by N0BOX View Post

There is always the option of the C2-stepping Sandy Bridge-E chips (i7-3820, i7-3930K, i7-3960X). They all support VT-d, and they all support overclocking (the 3820 isn't "unlocked", but it's multiplier is "partially unlocked"... it allows you to go to a certain point, but not near as far as the "K" and "X" chips).
I have the i7-3930K, and my Asus P9X79 Deluxe motherboard supports VT-d. The way I understand it, many of the X79 chipset boards do support VT-d. These are the perfect boards and chips for consumer virtualization, especially if you go for the full 64GB or 96GB of RAM that some of the boards support and use the 6-core (12-thread / 12 vCPU) chips.


+1 for the C2 stepping Sandy Bridge-E chips. My i7-3930K works nicely with VT-d.

With regard to the Asus motherboard:

1. The Marvell SATA controller has a bug. I posted a bug report re Marvell and here the response from a kernel dev:
Quote:
This bug affects vanilla kernels up to and including 3.6.3.

The problem seems to be a design issue with the Marvell controller. With
VT-d enabled, each device gets its own "view" of memory it can get
access to. The Marvell chip only registers one device per SATA port, but
actually uses more than one device. It's this second phantom device that
is not allowed memory access when VT-d is enabled.

It may eventually be worked around in the kernel, but it's not an easy
fix. AFAIK the current thinking is to register the phantom device
automatically when the first one is found.

Also see https://bugzilla.kernel.org/show_bug.cgi?id=42679

** Bug watch added: Linux Kernel Bug Tracker #42679
http://bugzilla.kernel.org/show_bug.cgi?id=42679

So make sure you're not using the Marvell controller. In my case, at some stage of installing the system the Xen hypervisor wouldn't even boot with the Marvell SATA enabled, however, a regular kernel (w/o Xen) would boot OK.

2. Which BIOS release do you run on the Asus motherboard? Someone on the Asus forum reported a broken VT-d for BIOS release 2104 of the Asus X79 Sabertooth board. I wrote to Asus techsup and they denied the broken VT-d, but in the same response they also stated that they don't support Linux !!!
I can't confirm the VT-d bug, as I haven't tried to upgrade the BIOS. The upgrade is supposedly irreversible.

I would greatly appreciate if you could let us know the BIOS release you are using with your Asus P9X79 Deluxe motherboard. By the way, did you manage to run Xen / Linux dom0 with a Windows domU on your hardware?
post #350 of 824
Quote:
Originally Posted by powerhouse View Post

Can you share the config file line? Example:
Code:
disk = [ 'phy:/dev/mapper/lm13-win7,hda,w' , 'phy:/dev/mapper/photos-photo1_stripe,hdb,w' , 'phy:/dev/mapper/photos-photos_raw,hdc,w' ]
If I recall correctly, the disk shouldn't be formatted (NO file system) once you're done with the lvcreate command (I assume you use LVM).
EDIT: You mentioned you used virt-manager. I never used it for creating/editing a VM. I find it easier to edit the /etc/xen/win7.cfg or whatever file directly (see code above). Make a backup copy of the config file, to be save.
EDIT2: What is your hardware?

So i got rid of the disk I made with virt-manager and just made another volume using lvcreate. Now when I try to initialize it, I get it's write protected. Here's the line from my config:

disk = [ 'phy:/dev/vg_dom0/domUa,hda,w' 'phy:/dev/vg_dom0/lvol0,hdb,w' ]

Got it, this link solved it:
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/971436
Note: My drive wasn't actually listed as read only in disk part, but clearing the attribute again fixed it. Oh windows, i'll never understand you redface.gif
Edited by nyxcharon - 12/9/12 at 2:29pm
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