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post #361 of 820
Is it possible that you're trying to mount an ext4 fs as ext3?

I'm just taking a stab in the dark with that question. I have never dealt with fedora's liveCDs. Ubuntu builds the whole filesystem inside of a squashfs container. It's possible that your filesystem cannot be mounted by whatever bootloader is used by the liveCD, or that the kernel packaged with that liveCD doesn't have the filesystem built into the kernel statically (not as a module). I'm not sure if it's really possible to extract a liveCD, add stuff to it, and have it end up unable to load the filesystem unless you are trying to create a liveCD that creates a Xen dom0 + hypervisor from the CD... The Xen hypervisor's "kernel" may not be able to load the filesystem that the liveCD uses.
post #362 of 820
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by N0BOX View Post

Is it possible that you're trying to mount an ext4 fs as ext3?
I'm just taking a stab in the dark with that question. I have never dealt with fedora's liveCDs. Ubuntu builds the whole filesystem inside of a squashfs container. It's possible that your filesystem cannot be mounted by whatever bootloader is used by the liveCD, or that the kernel packaged with that liveCD doesn't have the filesystem built into the kernel statically (not as a module). I'm not sure if it's really possible to extract a liveCD, add stuff to it, and have it end up unable to load the filesystem unless you are trying to create a liveCD that creates a Xen dom0 + hypervisor from the CD... The Xen hypervisor's "kernel" may not be able to load the filesystem that the liveCD uses.

The way livecd-creator works is that it uses a squashfs container to make the installation. My issue has nothing to do with booting the livecd either. The program is supposed to be able to open the livecd and add packages and features with a kickstart file. I am not having any issues mounting the .iso manually, but you actually might have hit the nail on the head. The loops might not be working because the partition I am using for temporary storage is ext3 and the system drive (where /dev/loop resides) is ext4. Could this be tricking the program?

I did manually mount and copy the contents to a working folder. I suppose I could tell yum to use that as an environment, but I really don't know how to go about doing that.
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post #363 of 820
Quote:
Originally Posted by dizzy4 View Post

The way livecd-creator works is that it uses a squashfs container to make the installation. My issue has nothing to do with booting the livecd either. The program is supposed to be able to open the livecd and add packages and features with a kickstart file. I am not having any issues mounting the .iso manually, but you actually might have hit the nail on the head. The loops might not be working because the partition I am using for temporary storage is ext3 and the system drive (where /dev/loop resides) is ext4. Could this be tricking the program?
I did manually mount and copy the contents to a working folder. I suppose I could tell yum to use that as an environment, but I really don't know how to go about doing that.

Could you post the kickstart file you are using? Maybe I can give it a try.

I don't think it's the best idea to call yum manually, but If you want yum to install to a specific root/mount point, you would run:
Code:
yum --installroot=/tmp/chroot install <...>

The respective rpm command is:
Code:
rpm --root=/tmp/chroot -ivh <...>.rpm

If you do this, note that the repositories and distro version are taken from the host, not the chroot.
post #364 of 820
What kind of a performance hit do you take when gaming on a VM over gaming on a regular windows install? Is there any way for "MOAR CORES" to improve gaming performance past what you could get with your ordinary bottleneck-free k-sku processor?

Translation: Is there any good reason to do this if you aren't hellbent on using Linux? Is there an advantage for someone who is already happy with just plain windows?
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post #365 of 820
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chenxiaolong View Post

Could you post the kickstart file you are using? Maybe I can give it a try.
I don't think it's the best idea to call yum manually, but If you want yum to install to a specific root/mount point, you would run:
Code:
yum --installroot=/tmp/chroot install <...>
The respective rpm command is:
Code:
rpm --root=/tmp/chroot -ivh <...>.rpm
If you do this, note that the repositories and distro version are taken from the host, not the chroot.

I am using the --base-on=livecd.iso flag which supposedly uses the existing live cd iso. The idea of this flag is mainly to add packages and features not included with the original live cd. There is no documentation of its usage or how to write a kickstart for it. From what I gather, the kickstart only needs to contain the extra packages, repos, flags and scripts. The kickstart is not the issue since I already have a working livecd.iso.... the issue is getting the livecd-creator to handle the mounting properly.
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post #366 of 820
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by alcal View Post

What kind of a performance hit do you take when gaming on a VM over gaming on a regular windows install? Is there any way for "MOAR CORES" to improve gaming performance past what you could get with your ordinary bottleneck-free k-sku processor?
Translation: Is there any good reason to do this if you aren't hellbent on using Linux? Is there an advantage for someone who is already happy with just plain windows?

Typical performance hit is less than 5%. In most cases it is well below 1% or the margin of error is too great to accurately see a performance hit at all. This makes it simple to keep machines completely separate, but more importantly lets you run them simultaneously. For instance: a gaming pc and an htpc running on the same hardware at the some time.

I also hate the whole "bottleneck" sensationalism... Most of the modern core processors will not create a huge difference in performance at all. My i7-2600 might have less ghz than a lot of overclocked k series chips, but it games really well still. Most of the performance issues in games are GPU based and then the only time bottleneck applies is to multi-gpu solutions where there are physically less connections that can be made. Even at that, pci-e 2.0@x8 is almost always enough bandwidth and with 3.0 is always enough. Sure some games are more processor intensive so overclocking helps a bit, but those systems cant also be running another full gaming vm or htpc at the same time tongue.gif

So basically moar cores = more virtual machines. There issue really is in how many threads the game itself has and how many it can use. Paravirtualization might increase performance a little as you suggest, but is much harder to do right.

It's not for everyone, but it sure is cool technology. Besides, C2 stepping 2011 cpus can overclock and do this.
Edited by dizzy4 - 12/12/12 at 4:11pm
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post #367 of 820
Quote:
Originally Posted by dizzy4 View Post

The way livecd-creator works is that it uses a squashfs container to make the installation. My issue has nothing to do with booting the livecd either. The program is supposed to be able to open the livecd and add packages and features with a kickstart file. I am not having any issues mounting the .iso manually, but you actually might have hit the nail on the head. The loops might not be working because the partition I am using for temporary storage is ext3 and the system drive (where /dev/loop resides) is ext4. Could this be tricking the program?
I did manually mount and copy the contents to a working folder. I suppose I could tell yum to use that as an environment, but I really don't know how to go about doing that.

Theoretically, Linux should be able to handle any number of different filesystem types mounted, regardless of whether they are a mix of ext3/4 and compressed container loop mounts... There are only two possible problems I can imagine having: doing a copy operation that preserves some kind of attribute that doesn't exist in the filesystem you are copying files to (say like trying to copy a file from an ext4 partition to an exfat partition while preserving file ownership and permissions?) and trying to copy files into the squashfs filesystem... I believe you have to extract the whole filesystem, chroot it, modify it, and then recompress it back to squashfs.

Other than that, I can't make a guess as to what could cause your problem.
post #368 of 820
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by N0BOX View Post

Theoretically, Linux should be able to handle any number of different filesystem types mounted, regardless of whether they are a mix of ext3/4 and compressed container loop mounts... There are only two possible problems I can imagine having: doing a copy operation that preserves some kind of attribute that doesn't exist in the filesystem you are copying files to (say like trying to copy a file from an ext4 partition to an exfat partition while preserving file ownership and permissions?) and trying to copy files into the squashfs filesystem... I believe you have to extract the whole filesystem, chroot it, modify it, and then recompress it back to squashfs.
Other than that, I can't make a guess as to what could cause your problem.

yeah that's what I thought. It looks like I will just have to create a custom livecd with a full kickstart or just manually do it using yum and chroot into the right path. Hopefully I will resolve this soon.
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post #369 of 820
Quote:
Originally Posted by alcal View Post

What kind of a performance hit do you take when gaming on a VM over gaming on a regular windows install? Is there any way for "MOAR CORES" to improve gaming performance past what you could get with your ordinary bottleneck-free k-sku processor?
Translation: Is there any good reason to do this if you aren't hellbent on using Linux? Is there an advantage for someone who is already happy with just plain windows?
If you're happy with Windows, why would you want to change anything? Unless you dual-boot Windows and Linux.

But since you asked about advantages (if any), here is my take:

1. Porting your Windows VM to a new PC: Of course there are ways to clone native Windows drives, but the clones only work with the hardware Windows was installed on. If you run Windows in a VM (Xen domU), it is relatively easy to take the Windows VM to another PC. With a passed-through graphics adapter, you would just install the (old) adapter in your new PC and perhaps adopt USB host or SATA controller PCI IDs - a simple edit of the config file - and your Windows will run just fine.
2. Backup Windows: There are backup or cloning tools for Windows, but I cannot recall anything that comes close to the simplicity of a LVM backup. LVM is Logical Volume Management. Using the "snapshot" feature, you can backup a running Windows VM. LVM is a Linux feature.
3. Virtual drives: LVM (see above) virtualizes your drives. Windows has "dynamic volumes", their proprietary implementation of LVM. Let's make it short - LVM has several advantages such as compatibility, robustness, etc. Read http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamic_disk to get some ideas of why not to use Windows dynamic volumes, and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Logical_Volume_Manager_%28Linux%29 to see what you can do with LVM.
4. No more crappy hardware RAID: Although Windows 7 has dynamic volume which supports stripes (RAID0), mirror (RAID1) etc. - LVM does that too - many users still use hardware RAID, what I mean is the usually sloppy, proprietary BIOS RAID implementation found on many mother boards. Linux has a far superior software RAID option that's dominated (and still dominates) the storage array and server market.
5. Running 2 or more VMs on the same PC: You can run 2 or perhaps more gaming VMs on one PC. Great for LAN parties. Or as dizzy4 wrote, a gaming VM and a HTPC VM, or whatever you fancy.

Above are the immediate advantages I see (there are probably more, but I can't think about them now). As to performance, I don't see a difference between a native bare metal Windows installation and running Windows in a VM using VGA passthrough. I've done some practical performance tests such as running CPU and disk intensive tasks in Windows and Linux and I'm absolutely thrilled about how well CPU resources scale to different tasks. For example, I processed several hundred RAW photo files in Windows using Lightroom while at the same time I ripped a DVD under Linux using "handbrake". Monitoring both VMs you could watch the CPU resources being assigned to the processes that needed them, and released when a process was idle (for example during I/O). I have 10 of 12 CPU threads (6-core CPU) assigned to Windows, but Linux can grab them when Windows is idle. Vice versa, Windows can grab almost all CPU resources when Linux doesn't use them.

The only bottleneck I can see is with the applications that can't make full use of my hardware. As far as I can see, it's mainly the applications that are behind the times with regard to performance.

P.S.: There are PV drivers available for Windows, which I use. They make a huge difference for disk I/O performance.
post #370 of 820
Has anybody attempted this with Fedora 17?
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