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Overclock CPU in Linux - Necessary Program Names Given! - Page 2

Poll Results: Prior to this thread, have you found it difficult to find software to overclock the CPU in Linux, that isn't tied to a specific machine (like the Linux overclocking software for the Eee PC)?

 
  • 21% (6)
    It was a breeze to find, what are you talking about?!
  • 7% (2)
    It was moderately easy to find.
  • 14% (4)
    Medium difficulty
  • 32% (9)
    Difficult
  • 25% (7)
    Absurdly difficult/ I did not succeed
28 Total Votes  
post #11 of 34
YES OMG.
Finally!
I have been looking for this forever.
Thank you.
thumb.gifbiggrin.gif
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post #12 of 34
I've never even thought once about overclocking in Linux. Time to start!
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post #13 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by ragtag7 View Post

I've never even thought once about overclocking in Linux. Time to start!

you over clock in linux like you would in windows, thru your bios. This is more for prebuilts that don't have full access to bios options to overclock your cpu.

 

just be weary tho, sometimes windows "stable" overclock", are flaky in linux.

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post #14 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Transhour View Post

you over clock in linux like you would in windows, thru your bios. This is more for prebuilts that don't have full access to bios options to overclock your cpu.

just be weary tho, sometimes windows "stable" overclock", are flaky in linux.

When you say prebuilts, do you mean like stock?
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FX-8120 GA-990FXA-UD3 Sapphire Tri-X R9 290X 8GB GDDR5 OC Edition 16GB G.Skill 2133Mhz 
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The Beginning.
(18 items)
 
Work Test Machine
(10 items)
 
Toshi
(12 items)
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX-8120 GA-990FXA-UD3 Sapphire Tri-X R9 290X 8GB GDDR5 OC Edition 16GB G.Skill 2133Mhz 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Seagate 500GB 7200rpm 6Gb/s Seagate 1TB 7200rpm 6Gb/s Samsung 850 PRO 256GB Seagate 2TB 7200rpm 6Gb/s 
Optical DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Sony Optiarc Corsair H60 Win7HP64bit/Ubuntu 14.04LTS HP 2310m 1080p @60Hz 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Razer BlackWidow Ultimate Seasonic X750 Gold Cooler Master Storm Stryker Razer Mamba 2012 
Mouse PadAudio
Razer Destructor 2 BF4 Edition Creative Sound Blaster Zx 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i5 4690k GA-Z97-HD3 MSI HD7950 3GBGDDR5 OC Twin Frozr edition 12GBs G.SKILL 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSPower
Seagate 500GB 7200RPM  DELL Generic Windows 10 Professional 64bit / Mint 17.3 64bit Seasonic x650 
CaseAudio
Cooler Master Elite 430 Realtek 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD A8-6410 Toshiba something idk. AMD R5 1GBGDDR5 16GB 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
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post #15 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by ragtag7 View Post


When you say prebuilts, do you mean like stock?

i guess you can call them stock computers, i've always called them prebuilts. mainly talking about like dell's, hp that produce their own bios versions or have boards custom made for them.

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post #16 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Transhour View Post

i guess you can call them stock computers, i've always called them prebuilts. mainly talking about like dell's, hp that produce their own bios versions or have boards custom made for them.

Yeah, like one of my old 775 boards I use for a home server. It's an Asus board, but it was made specifically for HP with their own locked down bios.
post #17 of 34
Thread Starter 
Quote:
you over clock in linux like you would in windows, thru your bios.

About the above; if you're overclocking through your BIOS, you're _not_ overclocking through Linux _or_ Windows, you're overclocking through your BIOS.
Quote:
It's an Asus board, but it was made specifically for HP with their own locked down bios.

So what exactly is locked down about it? If you're referring to the BIOS not providing the feature to overclock, how is not providing the feature to overclock locking anything? It's just not providing the feature. It's not like it's deliberately taking actions to prevent you from overclocking. It's not setting the MSR to read-only for that power cycle or anything.

Now, I did discover that some firmwares, upon boot, flip a bit in the MSR that disables ring negative one (hardware-assisted virtualization) for that power cycle. It flips a bit, and the processor itself is designed so that once that bit is flipped, you can't unflip it. So even though the system firmware (BIOS, EFI, whatever) isn't being executed anymore once you're booted into your operating system (or so one would hope), it left an effect behind. Here, the system firmware really is locking something. But simply not providing the feature to overclock isn't in itself locking anything.

I've heard the phrase "the multipler is locked" thrown around a lot. I'm skeptical that this has actually been locked, rather than simply not provided. "Locked" implies that the ability is there, but has artificially been made unavailable, like the disabling of ring negative one. _That's_ locking. My guess with the unchangable multiplier is that the hardware to change the multiplier simply isn't on the baord.

Cheers,
Jake

P.S. I simplified the above example of disabling ring negative one. The whole truth of it is that there are _two_ bits involved. One bit is an on/off switch. A bit is either a one or a zero. Typically, a one is on and a zero is off, but it could be the other way around, it doesn't matter as long as it's consistent. So one bit is just an on/off switch that can turn ring -1 on and off all day long. You can turn it on, then turn it off, then turn it on...you can just keep flicking that switch, as far as I know, as long as the other bit lets you. The other bit determines whether or not you can flip the "on/off" switch. So if ring -1 is off, and the locking bit gets in the locked position, you can't flip the on/off switch back to the on position. Or if it's on, and locked, you can't turn it off. But if it's not locked you can turn it on or off. That's how I understand it, at least. The stickler is that once the locking bit is in the locked position, it can't be put back into the unlocked position until a power cycle. Point is, some firmwares turn it off _and_ lock it in that position, during boot, before you even have a chance. By the time you're in your OS, or even your bootloader, it's too late. It's been flipped. Fortunately, someone found out how to write to /dev/mem in such a way to have the firmware no longer lock ring -1 upon boot (edits either the firmware itself or where it keeps its settings, I think it just tweaks the setting that tells it whether or not to lock the switch).
post #18 of 34
Thread Starter 
Hello everyone!

The spirit of this thread has been me trying to show that overclocking via the BIOS (which _is_ software) does the same exact thing as overclocking with software running under the OS: they both write to the MSR, and thus overclocking via your BIOS is _not_ superior to overclocking via software running under your OS. The latter is often called the "software solution" as if the BIOS isn't software.

I've been doing research online trying to support my guess that both methods write to the MSR and are thus really the same. I don't claim to know for sure they both do, but I did find what looks like evidence of that. The big one being the Intel documents saying that the way the CPU clock speed is controlled is by writing to the MSR, which further affects the PLL systems, which determines the CPU speed.

Well, I've found an exception to this, which goes against my initial guess, and therefore I find it exciting!biggrin.gif You see, a friend of mine is thinking about building a custom computer. Haven't bought any parts yet. He's asked me for some help, and the two of us have been researching hardware.

It wasn't too long until I found this: ASUS's TPU and EPU (thank you Newegg for not only having such great prices, but for also being such a wealth of knowledge!). Here's a link were some people discuss it: http://www.rage3d.com/board/showthread.php?t=33975240.

Some ASUS motherboards actually have a processor on the board dedicated to controlling the speed of the CPU! So here, the normal system of the CPU sending a code to a PLL chip isn't at play, but rather special hardware is controlling the PLL system (or maybe the CPU _can_ still talk to the PLL, but there's this other hardware for the purpose present).

So if there's special hardware present that can control clock speeds, and this hardware looks to the BIOS settings to see how to do the job, _in_that_situation_ I can see overclocking via the BIOS actually being superior to overclocking via software under your OS, provided that there is no way software under you OS can control the special software, and that the hardware does a better job of overclocking than possible by sending what you have written to the MSR to a PLL chip.

But in a typical scenario, where there is no special overclocking hardware present, it looks like my initial guess still stands that overclocking via the BIOS and overclocking via software under the OS both write to the MSR, are doing the same thing, and thus one is not better than the other.

This is something I'd like to have straight, so further input on this would be appreciated. If anyone is thoroughly convinced that overclocking through the BIOS is superior to overclocking via software under the OS, please say why, even if that reason is simply personal experience, with no known reason behind it.


Also want to note that at least one person (from the above link) likes manual overclocking better than trusting ASUS's TPU, which puts us back at square one. Is overclocking from the BIOS really superior?

Of course, I wrote this intending to reach out to Linux users on computers that don't have an option to overclock from the BIOS (or whatever their system firmware is), so whether one is better than the other isn't even choice to be had. It's just that when I delve into what's actually going on, I'm trying to see if there even is a difference, which naturally makes me wonder about people saying that going through the BIOS is superior.

Cheers,
Jake
post #19 of 34
Another tool for CPU overclocking --> http://www.ubuntugeek.com/indicator-cpufreq-cpu-frequency-indicator-ppa-installation-instructions-included.html
Nice topic SpawnHappyJake thumb.gif
Edited by CrazyGangster - 5/7/12 at 5:07pm
post #20 of 34
Thread Starter 
@Comokanu: I just Googled "install msr kernel module", and this came up first link: http://linux.koolsolutions.com/2009/09/19/howto-using-cpu-msr-tools-rdmsrwrmsr-in-debian-linux/.

Following the link, you will get to a website that first tells how to install msr-tools (not needed for overclocking, as far as I know). I just want to point that out so you don't confuse the msr kernel module with msr-tools. It's step two of the webpage that talks about getting the msr kernel module. Skip to that.

It's assumed that the Linux (kernel) source code shipped with your distro contains the source code for the msr kernel module. Question is, do you currently have it compiled as its own binary or in your current kernel image? If not, just change a config file as shown in the howto and recompile your kernel.

You can test to see if you even need to do any of that by doing "sudo modprobe msr", which will attempt to insert the msr kernel module into the running kernel. If it fails, it's probably because it doesn't exist. It should only not exist if it hasn't been compiled. If it hasn't been compiled, simply compile it by what's basically turning on msr support in your kernel's make config file, and then compile the kernel, as said above.

In the (seemingly unlikely?) case that your kernel source doesn't contain the msr kernel module source code, first make sure you have an at least moderately up-to-date kernel, and try again if you updated. If that fails, do some deeper searching on how to obtain the msr kernel module source code, or just change distros to something that _does_ include the MSR kernel module source code.



Don't forget that after getting the msr kernel module up and running you'll have to install either k10ctl or c2ctl or something that writes to the MSR via the MSR kernel module in your stead, unless you're super hard core and think you can overclock via personally writing to the MSR with no help whatsoever. That'd probably beat programming in assembly.

I don't know of any pre-compiled binaries for c2ctl or k10ctl. You'll probably have to compile them from source. Here's the c2ctl "homepage", and on that page is a link to the source tarball download (don't worry, it's easy to spot): http://www.ztex.de/misc/c2ctl.e.html.

And likewise for k10ctl: http://www.ztex.de/misc/k10ctl.e.html.

Remember, c2ctl for Intel, k10ctl for AMD.


Now, thanks to CrazyGangster, there appears to be a less hard-core option if the above is too much for you, see CrazyGangster's first post:

It's just a simple "sudo apt-get install indicator-cpufreq", however, it appears like it only allows you to choose a "performance state", similar to Intel TurboBoost, rather than you saying how fast you want the FSB to go. c2ctl and k10ctl just look all-around more sophisticated.

Also, c2ctl and k10ctl let you do voltage manipulation, and I have not yet seen evidence that you can change any voltages with indicator-cpufreq.


Good job CrazyGangster for finding and reporting another Linux CPU overclocking program, I'll add it to the list, and give you a rep!

Cheers,
Jake
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