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Enthusiast RAM question

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
I doubt most would be able to answer this. I am a long time Computer person. Extremely tech savvy, and I have gotten/see so many differnt types of things said about this. This is general RAM question.

What is the default ACTUAL clock speed of RAM? Like DDR3 1333. the 1333 from what i know stand's for Mega transfers per second. Mega transfers is roughly half the actual Clock speed of RAM. In BiOS, CPU-Z and programs I see my RAM at 666MHz. Which should mean that anytime somebody(especially a noob) says their RAM is running at 1333MHz it is false right? But then i heard something about how you have to double the base clock??

Basically. Tell me everything on the base clock, getting actual speed of RAM, how to find it. What those numbers after it mean. like DDR3 1066. IS it like CPU where you multiply one (base clock) by a multiplyer? What is CPU-Z trying to tell me when it says 666MHz. My Macbook Pro says 1066MHz RAM. I'm just going to guess that there is no standard way of companies for showing you how fast memory is like binary data. I'm guessing Apple is showing...actual MHz and CPU-Z and base clock is just....idk Explain plz
post #2 of 6
Frequency is measured in MHz. = Megahertz or cycles per second. It is not "mega transfers" though this term probably get tossed around too much.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hertz

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data_rate_units

DDR = Double Data Rate RAM which means two bits of data are processed for each cycle. So if your RAM runs at an advertised 1333 MHz. the actual frequency it runs at is 666.5 MHz. times 2 bits per cycle to equal 1333 MHz. Often the mobos runs RAM slightly faster or slower than the theoretical frequency.

RAM suppliers set the SPD info. in the DIMM to whatever they feel is the most likely use by consumers. SPD = Serial Presence Detect. It's what the BIOS reads so it knows what settings to use when it goes to boot your PC. Most DDR3 RAM that is rated for higher frequencies above 1333 MJz. must be over-clocked and typically over-volted, i.e. 1.65v vs. the default DDR3 v1.5v.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serial_presence_detect

CPU-Z shows you the current RAM settings and also the JDEC or other RAM optional settings possible for your RAM depending on if you select the RAM or SPD tabs.
Edited by AMD4ME - 1/27/12 at 7:55pm
post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AMD4ME View Post

Frequency is measured in MHz. = Megahertz or cycles per second. It is not "mega transfers" though this term probably get tossed around too much.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hertz
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data_rate_units
DDR = Double Data Rate RAM which means two bits of data are processed for each cycle. So if your RAM runs at an advertised 1333 MHz. the actual frequency it runs at is 666.5 MHz. times 2 bits per cycle to equal 1333 MHz. Often the mobos runs RAM slightly faster or slower than the theoretical frequency.
RAM suppliers set the SPD info. in the DIMM to whatever they feel is the most likely use by consumers. SPD = Serial Presence Detect. It's what the BIOS reads so it know what settings to use when it goes to boot your PC. Most DDR3 RAM that is rated for higher frequencies above 1333 MJz. must be over-clocked and typically over-volted, i.e. 1.65v vs. the default DDR3 v1.5v.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serial_presence_detect
CPU-Z shows you the current RAM settings and also the JDEC or other RAM optional settings possible for your RAM depending on if you select the RAM or SPD tabs.

wow...i was so over complicating things. Thank you very much, that was one hole in my knowledge on stuff like this biggrin.gif Thank you very much again
post #4 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by bowness437 View Post

wow...i was so over complicating things. Thank you very much, that was one hole in my knowledge on stuff like this biggrin.gif Thank you very much again

If you want to see a complex answer my friend, go look in the coding section. tongue.gif Anyways, welcome bowei.
Trinity
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Trinity
(19 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD A10-5800K Biostar Hi-Fi A85W APU Integrated Graphics G.Skill 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1600MHz CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveCooling
Crucial M4 64GB Western Digital WD Blue 500GB Lite-On iHAS124 CD/DVD Burner Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO (Pull Configuration) 
OSMonitorMonitorKeyboard
Windows 7 Home Premium 64-Bit NEC MultiSync LCD1970VX NEC MultiSync LCD1970VX Filco Majestouch Black w/ Cherry MX Blue (JIS l... 
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
Corsair CX430 NZXT Source 220 Logitech Click! Mouse SteelSeries QcK Mini Diablo III Edition 
AudioAudioOther
Sony SRS-T10PC USB Portable Speaker Realtek Onboard Audio Intel Centrino Desktop Wireless 
  hide details  
Reply
post #5 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by bowness437 View Post

wow...i was so over complicating things. Thank you very much, that was one hole in my knowledge on stuff like this biggrin.gif Thank you very much again

Glad to help. thumb.gif
post #6 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HybridCore View Post

If you want to see a complex answer my friend, go look in the coding section. tongue.gif Anyways, welcome bowei.

thank you hybrid
Quote:
Originally Posted by AMD4ME View Post

Glad to help. thumb.gif
haha
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