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GTX 470 Overclocking - Page 3

post #21 of 46
Enzotech is a good brand, but more importantly than anything else you want copper. No sense in doing this yourself manually to only put aluminum on there. Remember to measure everything twice as far as the area and amount you want to cover in heatsinks and then order once. And yes even at 1.087v you want some sort of cooling on your VRMs, and it would be be very foolish to go above that with bare VRMs and expect your card to last.
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post #22 of 46
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by juano View Post

Enzotech is a good brand, but more importantly than anything else you want copper. No sense in doing this yourself manually to only put aluminum on there. Remember to measure everything twice as far as the area and amount you want to cover in heatsinks and then order once. And yes even at 1.087v you want some sort of cooling on your VRMs, and it would be be very foolish to go above that with bare VRMs and expect your card to last.

Sorry for my extreme graphic card "newbieness". I know what heatsinks are, but what am I supposed to be measuring? The whole card? Or just the area of the VRMs? And how will I place the heatsink on the VRM?
post #23 of 46
See the picture below. You want to cover the all the black squares that I highlighted in red for you. You want to measure the area to be covered and then buy an appropriate amount of copper heatsinks to cover said area. You can accomplish this by either getting 15 small heatsinks that exactly cover the actual VRMs, or you can buy bigger heatsinks that will cover multiple VRMs each. The heatsinks will come with a thermal adhesive tape that will hold them to the VRMs. If your VRMs are not clean (gunk from old thermal pads or tape) then gently clean them with alcohol prior to installing the heatsinks as they attach better to a clean dry surface. Ensure that these will work for you by measuring but I would go with 2 sets of these if they will work for you.

270

Picture source is TechPowerUp.
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post #24 of 46
Thread Starter 
Much appreciated for all your help. What will make the VRMs cooler, and be wallet friendly, the big block heatsink, or the 15 small pieces?
post #25 of 46
In terms of temperatures it will be close to a wash, but the larger heatsinks covering multiple VRMs should be better. Either way you'll have to do the measuring yourself and see what works for you, I've done just about all I can to make this easier for you the rest you will have to decide on your own. As for the cost you're going to be looking at at least $22 because I don't expect you to be able to cover them all with one set, even of the larger heatsinks but you might be able to. That once again brings us back to you having to measure it out and decide for yourself, I've given you the brand of heatsinks to look for (Enzotech has a few different sizes that may work for you), highlighted the parts that need to be covered, the rest is up to you.
Edited by juano - 1/28/12 at 9:55pm
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post #26 of 46
Thread Starter 
Alright, i'm having an odd problem now. I'm running battlefield in the background, and the core clock is at 405 MHz, instead of 840, which is should be at. Including the shader clock, at 810, instead of 1680. It's pretty much halved. What's going on?

Edit - Pic

328
post #27 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by juano View Post

See the picture below. You want to cover the all the black squares that I highlighted in red for you. You want to measure the area to be covered and then buy an appropriate amount of copper heatsinks to cover said area. You can accomplish this by either getting 15 small heatsinks that exactly cover the actual VRMs, or you can buy bigger heatsinks that will cover multiple VRMs each. The heatsinks will come with a thermal adhesive tape that will hold them to the VRMs. If your VRMs are not clean (gunk from old thermal pads or tape) then gently clean them with alcohol prior to installing the heatsinks as they attach better to a clean dry surface. Ensure that these will work for you by measuring but I would go with 2 sets of these if they will work for you.

270

Picture source is TechPowerUp.


Dont forget the large "grey" cubes.. those are your inductors.. and actually produce most of the heat in this area with high core speeds. They are the "filters" for the mosfets stages.. and handle the brunt of the voltage fluctuations [which causes lots of heat]. Keeping them cool can increase stable clock speeds and voltage ranges.. as well as keep OCP lower.

 

**Flash your GTX470 to a SC or FTW BIOS.. to go up another .15v on core thumb.gif

 

post #28 of 46
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CL3P20 View Post



Dont forget the large "grey" cubes.. those are your inductors.. and actually produce most of the heat in this area with high core speeds. They are the "filters" for the mosfets stages.. and handle the brunt of the voltage fluctuations [which causes lots of heat]. Keeping them cool can increase stable clock speeds and voltage ranges.. as well as keep OCP lower.

**Flash your GTX470 to a SC or FTW BIOS.. to go up another .15v on core thumb.gif

Will do, going to make the measurements now for everything, but i'm still having problems with the core and shader clocks not cranking up. Any clue?
post #29 of 46

If you can keep load temps down you will gain more speed. Shaders are very heat and voltage sensitive.. and with them locked to core speed.. they ultimately limit your OC.

 

*Keep temps down for better clocks

1164.83_heavenDX11_gtx470-655k.jpg

post #30 of 46
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CL3P20 View Post

If you can keep load temps down you will gain more speed. Shaders are very heat and voltage sensitive.. and with them locked to core speed.. they ultimately limit your OC.

*Keep temps down for better clocks
600x375px-LL-0d535264_1164.83_heavenDX11_gtx470-655k.jpeg

Is there a way to unlink them?

Also, I went to measure the VRM, and the black case is covering it, I think it's a heatspreader, not sure.. Should I completely get rid of that, or keep it?
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