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AMD 1055T X6 Voltage Tests- Experts Needed

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
Hey guys, Im kinda new here, but I need to ask some of the experts around here about overclocking and overvolting (technical term?). Im just doing an Experiment myself for school to see if there is a coloration between overvolting and overclocking. So, will supplying more volts to the CPU make it easier or create lee way for higher clock speed that is actually "stable"? Im also kinda a noob with OCing, so I need a few tips, and heck, maybe a guide or two you can give me links to. Although, I do know one thing, lots of heat will be generated. I will have a full water loop in my Water Box Plus while doing this biggrin.gif Here is one specific question though, do you guys know what the sort of "max" voltage of a AMD Phenom II X6 1055T is, I don't want to blow my system? Plus, what are a few stress testing tools you would recommend to check "stability", besides normal use and SC2 smile.gif?



-Specs
-Crosshair V Formula Motherboard
- Phenom II X6 1055T 2.88 GHz
-EVGA Nvidia GTX 460 Super Clocked
- 4X4 Patriot Sector 5 1333 MHz DDR3 RAM
-Corsair Force Series 120 GB SSD
-650 Watt Power supply

Your help would be Appreciated biggrin.gif
post #2 of 6
You do get some leeway I believe when you raise the voltage. You can run stock clocks at 1.5v if you wanted, but no one ever would. I got 1.45 on my 3.6ghz clock, which is a lot, but my board is all screwy, so it works, even though its a high voltage for that clock. If you are wondering if overvolting allows you to overclock further, then thats pretty much what overclocking is. You overclock till its unstable, then add more volts, make sure temps are ok, then rinse and repeat.

To answer the second question, the max recommended voltage is 1.55v, but I know they can go beyond that with proper cooling. The Vregs are the thing you have to worry about at those voltages, as they can overheat, or just fail when they get up that high. Anything past about 1.5-1.52 on a quality 4+1 phase is very risky, and you would want to go to the next step up, 8+2 phase. I see your board is 8+2, so you should be fine on it, but make sure to watch VRM temps and such.

The third question, use Prime95, or OCCT, run for about 10 minutes to test quickly while overclocking, and do at least 6 hours without errors to say your system is "stable"

Edit- If you are planning on overclocking that high, pick up some 1600mhz ram, as it's better for overclocking, and also, look into buying a VRM waterblock for your watercooling loop if one is available for your motherboard if you want to go to like 1.52v+
Edited by lostmage - 1/31/12 at 5:59pm
Arcturus
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel 4690k @ 4.4ghz Asrock Z97 Pro4 Sapphire R9 390 G.Skill Sniper 2133mhz 8gb 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 850 Evo 250gb WD Blue - 1Tb Mirrored Hyper 212 Evo Windows 8.1 
PowerCaseAudioAudio
XFX TS 650w Corsair Carbide 200r Fiio E10/E9 Stack AKG Q701 
Audio
Grado SR325e 
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Arcturus
(13 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel 4690k @ 4.4ghz Asrock Z97 Pro4 Sapphire R9 390 G.Skill Sniper 2133mhz 8gb 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 850 Evo 250gb WD Blue - 1Tb Mirrored Hyper 212 Evo Windows 8.1 
PowerCaseAudioAudio
XFX TS 650w Corsair Carbide 200r Fiio E10/E9 Stack AKG Q701 
Audio
Grado SR325e 
  hide details  
Reply
post #3 of 6

If you want to overclock well, get rid of the 1333Mhz Sector 5 RAM.  At the 286-300Mhz bus clock rate you require for 4Ghz it is so much more ideal to have a 1600Mhz kit as you can run the RAM at nearly exactly that with the x5.33 multiplier.  I consider 1600Mhz RAM a minimum for 1055T overclocking.  You may effectively find yourself stuck at 250Mhz-260Mhz bus clock with your low binned 1333 CL9 1.65V kit (considering a requirement of 1.65V for generic 1333 CL9 settings that every other kit requires 1.5V for, you can conclude that this RAM kit is extremely low binned and probably not designed for any overclocking past stock).

post #4 of 6
Thread Starter 
Hmmm, this is unfortunate info, thanks for telling me xd. What RAM would you recommend (will only buy about 1 or two sticks, don't have the money for more than 1 or maybe two).

Also, to lostmage, thanks for telling me a about the phases, stick to 8+2 phase when going into the 1.5+ range. Do you have any preferences to VRM blocks? Looking for some right now as I type this.

-Edit: Shouldn't I only have 1 DIMM of RAM in the computer any way? This is only a experiament, so I probably wont keep my Volts permanently this high in normal use. I still will be getting my self a VRM block, just found one for my board, gonna do a little bit of research first on it.
Edited by Thorhian - 2/1/12 at 6:07pm
post #5 of 6

The Crosshair V Formula has been known for an ability to push FX and Phenom II processors with well above 1.55V and the VRMs handle it just fine.  They are well cooled and high quality components are used.  A VRM block is unnecessary, just ensure that a bit of airflow gets around there.


Get anything that is DDR3-1600 at minimum.  $23 shipped on Newegg can buy you a 2x2GB Patriot DDR3-1600 kit without heatspreaders (that don't matter anyway as DDR3 runs very cool) - this is close to the cost of 1333Mhz 2x2GB kits.

post #6 of 6
Thread Starter 
Sweet, was surprised to hear someone say I needed a VRM block on a Crosshair V, Like i said, im bit of a noob. Glad to be part of the forums smile.gif
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