Overclock.net › Forums › Intel › Intel CPUs › How important is 3930K C2 with VT-d
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

How important is 3930K C2 with VT-d - Page 2

post #11 of 18
Think of it like this, in virtualization,

Actual hardware < - > Windows (Host OS) < - > Virtualized hardware < - > Linux (Virtualized OS).

Linux can't see the actual PC hardware (i.e. Intel HD iGPU, Nividia GPU, Intel Ethernet Controller, ASUS Soundcard, etc). What Linux sees instead is virtualized hardware (2 generic GPUs, generic ethernet controller, generic sound card, etc). What Linux did to these hardware was then redirected to the actual hardware.

In VT-d,

Actual hardware < - > Shared between Windows (Host OS) and Linux (Virtualized OS).

In VT-d, Linux now see the actual hardware. It recognize that it has Intel HD iGPU, Nvidia GPU, Intel Ethernet Controller, ASUS Soundcard, etc. It can communicate with it directly. Each hardware can only talk to one OS at a time. So you can say dedicate Nvidia GPU to Linux and onboard GPU (Intel HD iGPU) to Windows. Now since Linux sees Nvidia GPU, you can install Nvidia driver for Linux (which you couldn't from before) and play some 3D games on Linux. Same goes true to other hardware.

Without VT-d, Linux only sees generic hardware. You couldn't install specialized driver and take advantage of its capabilities. With VT-d, you can.

If you have a golden C1 stepping (high OC with low voltage), don't swap it. If you don't, swap it to C2 stepping for the sake of higher resale value down the road.
Edited by trumpet-205 - 2/4/12 at 8:10pm
Misaka
(18 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i5-3570K ASRock Z68 Extreme4 Gen3 Sapphire HD 7850 2 GB Samsung DDR3 16 GB (30 nm) 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveCooling
Crucial M4 128 GB WD Caviar Blue 1 TB Lite-on DVD Burner Thermalright Venomous X 
OSOSMonitorKeyboard
Windows 7 Professional x64 (Host) Crunchbang Linux x64 (Guest) HP 2311x HP PS/2 Keyboard 
PowerCaseMouseAudio
Rosewill Capstone 450 W Rosewill Challenger Logitech M570 ASUS Xonar D1 
Other
Hauppauge HVR-1250 
  hide details  
Reply
Misaka
(18 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i5-3570K ASRock Z68 Extreme4 Gen3 Sapphire HD 7850 2 GB Samsung DDR3 16 GB (30 nm) 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveCooling
Crucial M4 128 GB WD Caviar Blue 1 TB Lite-on DVD Burner Thermalright Venomous X 
OSOSMonitorKeyboard
Windows 7 Professional x64 (Host) Crunchbang Linux x64 (Guest) HP 2311x HP PS/2 Keyboard 
PowerCaseMouseAudio
Rosewill Capstone 450 W Rosewill Challenger Logitech M570 ASUS Xonar D1 
Other
Hauppauge HVR-1250 
  hide details  
Reply
post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by trumpet-205 View Post

Think of it like this, in virtualization,
Actual hardware < - > Windows (Host OS) < - > Virtualized hardware < - > Linux (Virtualized OS).
Linux can't see the actual PC hardware (i.e. Intel HD iGPU, Nividia GPU, Intel Ethernet Controller, ASUS Soundcard, etc). What Linux sees instead is virtualized hardware (2 generic GPUs, generic ethernet controller, generic sound card, etc). What Linux did to these hardware was then redirected to the actual hardware.
In VT-d,
Actual hardware < - > Shared between Windows (Host OS) and Linux (Virtualized OS).
In VT-d, Linux now see the actual hardware. It recognize that it has Intel HD iGPU, Nvidia GPU, Intel Ethernet Controller, ASUS Soundcard, etc. It can communicate with it directly. Each hardware can only talk to one OS at a time. So you can say dedicate Nvidia GPU to Linux and onboard GPU (Intel HD iGPU) to Windows. Now since Linux sees Nvidia GPU, you can install Nvidia driver for Linux (which you couldn't from before) and play some 3D games on Linux. Same goes true to other hardware.
Without VT-d, Linux only sees generic hardware. You couldn't install specialized driver and take advantage of its capabilities. With VT-d, you can.
If you have a golden C1 stepping (high OC with low voltage), don't swap it. If you don't, swap it to C2 stepping for the sake of higher resale value down the road.

So I was simi-right. REP+ as you taught me something important.
2nd Rig
(17 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
[Intel] 2500k [4.5ghz] [1.3 volts] [AsRock] P67 Extreme 6 [Sapphire] 6950 Toxic (@ Stock) [Samsung] Low voltage memory [@1866 mHz 9-9-9-24] 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
[Corsair] 120gb Force GT Some Lite-On thing [Coolermaster] V8 Winders 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
[Gateway] FDH2402 [CM Storm] QuickFire TK [XFX] Core Edition PRO850W [In Win] Dragon Rider 
MouseAudioAudioAudio
[CM Storm] Sentinel Advance II [AUDIOTRAK] Prodigy HD2 ADVANCE DE [Polk Audio] PSW 505 and Monitor 40's Denon AVR-791 
Audio
Infinity P153's 
  hide details  
Reply
2nd Rig
(17 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
[Intel] 2500k [4.5ghz] [1.3 volts] [AsRock] P67 Extreme 6 [Sapphire] 6950 Toxic (@ Stock) [Samsung] Low voltage memory [@1866 mHz 9-9-9-24] 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
[Corsair] 120gb Force GT Some Lite-On thing [Coolermaster] V8 Winders 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
[Gateway] FDH2402 [CM Storm] QuickFire TK [XFX] Core Edition PRO850W [In Win] Dragon Rider 
MouseAudioAudioAudio
[CM Storm] Sentinel Advance II [AUDIOTRAK] Prodigy HD2 ADVANCE DE [Polk Audio] PSW 505 and Monitor 40's Denon AVR-791 
Audio
Infinity P153's 
  hide details  
Reply
post #13 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by trumpet-205 View Post

Think of it like this, in virtualization,
Actual hardware < - > Windows (Host OS) < - > Virtualized hardware < - > Linux (Virtualized OS).
Linux can't see the actual PC hardware (i.e. Intel HD iGPU, Nividia GPU, Intel Ethernet Controller, ASUS Soundcard, etc). What Linux sees instead is virtualized hardware (2 generic GPUs, generic ethernet controller, generic sound card, etc). What Linux did to these hardware was then redirected to the actual hardware.
In VT-d,
Actual hardware < - > Shared between Windows (Host OS) and Linux (Virtualized OS).
In VT-d, Linux now see the actual hardware. It recognize that it has Intel HD iGPU, Nvidia GPU, Intel Ethernet Controller, ASUS Soundcard, etc. It can communicate with it directly. Each hardware can only talk to one OS at a time. So you can say dedicate Nvidia GPU to Linux and onboard GPU (Intel HD iGPU) to Windows. Now since Linux sees Nvidia GPU, you can install Nvidia driver for Linux (which you couldn't from before) and play some 3D games on Linux. Same goes true to other hardware.
Without VT-d, Linux only sees generic hardware. You couldn't install specialized driver and take advantage of its capabilities. With VT-d, you can.
If you have a golden C1 stepping (high OC with low voltage), don't swap it. If you don't, swap it to C2 stepping for the sake of higher resale value down the road.

This help alot:

I'm afraid to make an RMA a lot people in other forums are complaining about they are getting a worst chips than the one before they had.
5.2ghz
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 core 3930K @ 5.0ghz ASUS Rampage IV Extreme 2 - EVGA GTX 980 SLi G.SKILL Ripjaws Z Series 16GB DDR3 2133 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
SSD Corsair Force Series 3 500GB  WD Velociraptor 300GB Custom Watercool  Window 7 pro 64 bit 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
Acer 4k monitor corsair gaming k70 ANTEC 1200W high current power CORSAIR Graphite 600T 
MouseMouse PadAudio
Logitech G9 WOWPAD Sound Blaster X-Fi Titanium Fatal1ty Profession... 
  hide details  
Reply
5.2ghz
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 core 3930K @ 5.0ghz ASUS Rampage IV Extreme 2 - EVGA GTX 980 SLi G.SKILL Ripjaws Z Series 16GB DDR3 2133 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
SSD Corsair Force Series 3 500GB  WD Velociraptor 300GB Custom Watercool  Window 7 pro 64 bit 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
Acer 4k monitor corsair gaming k70 ANTEC 1200W high current power CORSAIR Graphite 600T 
MouseMouse PadAudio
Logitech G9 WOWPAD Sound Blaster X-Fi Titanium Fatal1ty Profession... 
  hide details  
Reply
post #14 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by renaldy View Post

This help alot: 1+rep
I'm afraid to make an RMA a lot people in other forums are complaining about they are getting a worst chips than the one before they had.
5.2ghz
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 core 3930K @ 5.0ghz ASUS Rampage IV Extreme 2 - EVGA GTX 980 SLi G.SKILL Ripjaws Z Series 16GB DDR3 2133 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
SSD Corsair Force Series 3 500GB  WD Velociraptor 300GB Custom Watercool  Window 7 pro 64 bit 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
Acer 4k monitor corsair gaming k70 ANTEC 1200W high current power CORSAIR Graphite 600T 
MouseMouse PadAudio
Logitech G9 WOWPAD Sound Blaster X-Fi Titanium Fatal1ty Profession... 
  hide details  
Reply
5.2ghz
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 core 3930K @ 5.0ghz ASUS Rampage IV Extreme 2 - EVGA GTX 980 SLi G.SKILL Ripjaws Z Series 16GB DDR3 2133 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
SSD Corsair Force Series 3 500GB  WD Velociraptor 300GB Custom Watercool  Window 7 pro 64 bit 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
Acer 4k monitor corsair gaming k70 ANTEC 1200W high current power CORSAIR Graphite 600T 
MouseMouse PadAudio
Logitech G9 WOWPAD Sound Blaster X-Fi Titanium Fatal1ty Profession... 
  hide details  
Reply
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by renaldy View Post

This help alot:
I'm afraid to make an RMA a lot people in other forums are complaining about they are getting a worst chips than the one before they had.

Exactly. So please don't.
2nd Rig
(17 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
[Intel] 2500k [4.5ghz] [1.3 volts] [AsRock] P67 Extreme 6 [Sapphire] 6950 Toxic (@ Stock) [Samsung] Low voltage memory [@1866 mHz 9-9-9-24] 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
[Corsair] 120gb Force GT Some Lite-On thing [Coolermaster] V8 Winders 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
[Gateway] FDH2402 [CM Storm] QuickFire TK [XFX] Core Edition PRO850W [In Win] Dragon Rider 
MouseAudioAudioAudio
[CM Storm] Sentinel Advance II [AUDIOTRAK] Prodigy HD2 ADVANCE DE [Polk Audio] PSW 505 and Monitor 40's Denon AVR-791 
Audio
Infinity P153's 
  hide details  
Reply
2nd Rig
(17 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
[Intel] 2500k [4.5ghz] [1.3 volts] [AsRock] P67 Extreme 6 [Sapphire] 6950 Toxic (@ Stock) [Samsung] Low voltage memory [@1866 mHz 9-9-9-24] 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
[Corsair] 120gb Force GT Some Lite-On thing [Coolermaster] V8 Winders 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
[Gateway] FDH2402 [CM Storm] QuickFire TK [XFX] Core Edition PRO850W [In Win] Dragon Rider 
MouseAudioAudioAudio
[CM Storm] Sentinel Advance II [AUDIOTRAK] Prodigy HD2 ADVANCE DE [Polk Audio] PSW 505 and Monitor 40's Denon AVR-791 
Audio
Infinity P153's 
  hide details  
Reply
post #16 of 18
VT-d means Virtualization Technology Directed I/o.

In english that means that normally a VM has a set of drivers that virtualize your hardware. It mimics what a hardware graphics card can do for instance but does this on a software level.

VT-d allows direct access to your Graphics Card, Raid Card, RAM, other hardware on a hardware level. There is no fake software hardware running. You get much higher performance especially on the storage side of the equation with VT-d enabled.

VT-x is a direct hardware path to your processor and memory. But no other hardware is included. VT-x is more than enough power for even running 5 VM's if you have the disk setup correct. VT-d is good for running Virtual Machines for instance, A linux VM with a ultra high power CAD software that needs full GPU power behind it, at the same time you are running a windows box that is also using the GPU or another GPU for some other heavy hardware task . This is not possible with a software VT-x based setup.

For games it means nothing at all. Period! NOTHING!

For anything else besides needing dedicated GPU, Storage, or other hardware in your virtualized environment, VT-d is a Godsend!

Hope it helps.

As far as RMA, it is not Critical at all right now to do one. I would wait another 2 months and then do an RMA once the market us fully saturated with C2 chips. You do not want to get a C1 chip on accident or on purpose from Intel. However I highly doubt they would do that to you because the nature of your RMA would be to gain working VT-d. I plan to do this but I am not trying to run 5.2ghz daily driven. I am happy crusing the freeways at 4.7ghz and I am sure ANY c1/c2 chip can do this all day long.
Edited by Tangoseal - 2/4/12 at 8:36pm
6 Core Battle Box
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsGraphics
Intel Core I7-3930K Asus Rampage IV Extreme Powercolor Radeon HD 6990 LCS Edition Diamond Radeon HD 6990 
RAMHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Corsair Vengeance Black DDR3-1600 32GB Samsung HD103SJ Crucial M4 60GB SSD Corsair Force3 120GB SSD 
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
Custom build water cooling loop Windows 7 Ultimate 64bit Asus Pro 24" Pro-IPS 16:10 x 3 in eyefinity Razer Black Widow Ultimate Cherry Blue switches 
PowerCaseMouse
Corsair AX-1200 GPU PSU and Antec True Power New Caselabs TH10 Razer Deathadder 1800dpi 
  hide details  
Reply
6 Core Battle Box
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsGraphics
Intel Core I7-3930K Asus Rampage IV Extreme Powercolor Radeon HD 6990 LCS Edition Diamond Radeon HD 6990 
RAMHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Corsair Vengeance Black DDR3-1600 32GB Samsung HD103SJ Crucial M4 60GB SSD Corsair Force3 120GB SSD 
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
Custom build water cooling loop Windows 7 Ultimate 64bit Asus Pro 24" Pro-IPS 16:10 x 3 in eyefinity Razer Black Widow Ultimate Cherry Blue switches 
PowerCaseMouse
Corsair AX-1200 GPU PSU and Antec True Power New Caselabs TH10 Razer Deathadder 1800dpi 
  hide details  
Reply
post #17 of 18
I use VMs quite a lot for work. VT-d sounds like a great feature but wouldn't that mean that a VM that was built on specific hardware would not work properly if you copied the VM to another host?
One thing seems clear, if all that is different with C2 is VT-d then it shouldn't be a big deal for most people.
post #18 of 18
Pardon the necro.

I've recently started doing development work on Android stuff, and VT-d is a huge help if you're using the SDK's built-in emulator to test your apps. VT-d lets me emulate an Atom CPU instead of the usual ARM, and gets a huge increase in speed by allowing the emulator full access to one of the CPU cores instead of doing full emulation for the processor.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Intel CPUs
Overclock.net › Forums › Intel › Intel CPUs › How important is 3930K C2 with VT-d