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Hey guys, at the time of writing this, I have a Razer Naga dismantled and sitting on my lap. Why, you ask? For the community to learn from.

So without further adieu:

The Razer Naga is probably the most popular MMO mouse on the market right now. It has 12 side buttons for all your binding pleasure, and an excellent ergonomic shape which feels great for long sessions. However, Razer has a habit of making subpar products, in my experience, so I decided to take a look why.

Dismantle
To dismantle the Razer Naga, you'll need two Phillips head (+) screwdrivers, as small as you can get. Initially, the screws are very forgiving to screw driver size, but they get smaller and more finicky, and are placed in more obscure spots.
  1. Remove the teflon pad surrounding the lower side of the mouse. It's the part that the mouse slips on. The screws to remove the top are located under this.
  2. Unscrew all 4 screws where the teflon pad was previously.
  3. Remove the top by pulling directly up. I had to twist it back and forth a bit to get it unsteated.
  4. The right side simply pulls up and off.
  5. The left side must be pulled from the front portion of the mouse, then run your finger along the bottom of the side until it pops free. Two cables will obstruct your progress.
  6. One cable is a ribbon cable, and can be disengaged by unclipping the black ribbon clips. Simply pull them up and pull the cable free.
  7. The other is a data transfer to the mouse 4 and 5 buttons. It has a clip on the front side of the mouse. Depress this and pull up. It took me a few tries, and I have small hands, so keep at it. DO NOT FORCE IT. My PCB bent pretty dangerously.
  8. Disengage the other white cable near the rear of the mouse. This is power and data to the mouse it's self.
  9. There is a small black screw next to the scroll wheel. Remove this next. It takes a very small phillips to remove. Pull the PCB free of the mouse wheel. It's wedged in there, so you may have to turn it. It's a very awkward shape.
  10. Next, remove all mounting screws for the PCB. There's three located around the PCB.
  11. At this point, I struggled a bit with the two last screws. My hand is bleeding as I write this from the sheer amount of force it took to simply undo one. frown.gif
  12. Undoing the last screw, I lifted the PCB out of it's resting place and the mouse wheel simply fell off. Simple. I was able to fennagle the cord out of reach. The mouse is now entirely dismantled. Now onto the next section

Internals - Album
The Razer Naga uses Omron D2FC-F-7N (Also, I seem to be the only person on the internet that's revealed that information so far. No results on Google, at least.

The PCB is an iteration of Razer's PCB's called the "Lynn" and is surprisingly solid. All parts are firmly secured and a healthy but not overkill amount of solder securely fixes all capacitors and whatnot to the PCB. That said, there's only two capacitors in the entire mouse. Chances are, if something fails, it won't be one of those. They're both 25V capacitors. Both are rated to 105 degrees Celsius.

The "Num/123" switch on the underside of the mouse is a piece of plastic with a notch in it, which moves a delicate piece of plastic roughly .1 mm to another switch position. If your mouse is having trouble switching from Num to 123, I'd suspect this as the perpetrator.

On the top of the mouse, the part you took away at the beginning after removing the 4 screws from under the teflon, there is a weight. If the Naga is too heavy, this can easily be removed

The mouse wheel is a rubber fitting over a solid plastic wheel, with two dense stickers on the sides to make it visually appealing. These came off as I worked, sadly.

The cable for the mouse is slightly frayed at the base of the PCB, and the rubber for the portion of the cable where it meets the mouse is flawed, and has a small hole. I suspect this will extrapolate it's self over time and create a poor fitting for the cable.

The USB is a standard gold plated male USB cord. Nothing particularly special. The sleeving for the USB cord is rather solid and tight, but there are some areas where the rubber is showing. This is due to the way the mouse was packaged. The cord was placed improperly in the box, and it tore the sleeving, causing the rubber cable to be revealed.

It appears to have a small processor near the rear. There are no distinguishing marks to indicate the OEM, just a serial number.

The memory also has no distinguishing marks, but a series of 3 serials. My memory had writing from a sharpie on it. I'd assume it's from quality control.

At this point, there's nothing else to say, so let's reassemble.

Opinions
Upon further assessment of this mouse, I've actually concluded that it really isn't as bad as I make it out to be. The PCB doesn't flex unless put under tremendous force. All internal parts are, for the most part, firmly in place. The microswitches, the Omron D2FC-F-7N's, are the same switches used in almost every popular mouse today. Razer DeathAdder, Logitech G500, and CM Storm Spawn, and EVERYTHING in between, all use these switches. They're remarkably reliable and I cannot fault Razer on that. However, the reason I initially took the mouse apart was to repair it. I successfully cleared some "gunk" off of the switch, where the plastic portion had worn down and built up plastic shavings, which seems to have fixed the problem. Any double click issues people are having are due to the design of the mouse and not the switches. I can't say this mouse is awful mechanically, it uses very standard and widely used parts. However, some of the assembly was a bit shoddy, and when reassembling it, I affixed it in a more solid fashion than Razer had.

This is a carbon copy thread from - MMO-Champion
Lithium
(19 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i5 2500k @ 4.8 Asus Maximus IV Gene Z Twin Frozr III GTX 580 4GB x 4 Mushkin Redline 
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1TB Samsung Spinpoint x 4 120GB Mushkin Chronos x 2 None Corsair H100 
OSMonitorKeyboardPower
Win7 Home Prem DELL SR2320L Microsoft Sidewinder X4 Corsair TX650W 
CaseMouseMouse PadAudio
Corsair 550D Logitech G400 Razer Kabuto Audio-Technica M50S 
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Logitech X-240 2.1 Fiio E9 Headphone Amplifier Creative X-fi Titanium Sound Card 
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Lithium
(19 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i5 2500k @ 4.8 Asus Maximus IV Gene Z Twin Frozr III GTX 580 4GB x 4 Mushkin Redline 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveCooling
1TB Samsung Spinpoint x 4 120GB Mushkin Chronos x 2 None Corsair H100 
OSMonitorKeyboardPower
Win7 Home Prem DELL SR2320L Microsoft Sidewinder X4 Corsair TX650W 
CaseMouseMouse PadAudio
Corsair 550D Logitech G400 Razer Kabuto Audio-Technica M50S 
AudioAudioAudio
Logitech X-240 2.1 Fiio E9 Headphone Amplifier Creative X-fi Titanium Sound Card 
  hide details  
Reply