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post #61 of 63
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Warmonger View Post

In a sense yes, but 99% of programs have the key hard-coded right in to save several months of time. But I mean for a text document? I could download TrueCrypt and encrypt 98% of my hard drive contents for that matter. Where there is encryption there is a purpose. I don't really see the purpose here other then messing around with bits and pieces of code (sure thats still fun but not for encrypting your homework). I have a buddy who is a omega at finding DES encryption keys for online games. I don't wanna sound like a troll but your thread is kinda just e-peen. There's much more to encryption algorithms then just security, speed also plays a important factor. If you posted this topic with a much faster and secure algorithm then anything existing. Then it would be something to talk about. But saying "crack this encryption without anything! jejeje" is kinda... well you get it. With a 5 bit key there are only 32 possible key combinations. So cracking it would be a piece of cake if you provided a tool that handles the algorithm (this is why people are trolling). Without it there is no point in this topic as no one would ever have your binary other then you anyways.

The plan is to make a program that allows the user to input the following:

Text
key length: drop down box, or input the bit length
key: convert text to key, or type in key manually

I want to create a very simple encryption, that's easy to use, fast, and hard to crack. Of course, 5-bit wouldn't be likely. But it's an example. But it wasn't a 5-bit key. It was a 5 digit key, so my bad. But 5 digits, that are numbers, there are 100,000 possible keys.
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post #62 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by SIMPSONATOR View Post

The plan is to make a program that allows the user to input the following:
Text
key length: drop down box, or input the bit length
key: convert text to key, or type in key manually
I want to create a very simple encryption, that's easy to use, fast, and hard to crack. Of course, 5-bit wouldn't be likely. But it's an example. But it wasn't a 5-bit key. It was a 5 digit key, so my bad. But 5 digits, that are numbers, there are 100,000 possible keys.

I would say RC4 is the way to go, being a very simple algorithm used for everything from WEP to SSL (your home network is probably using it right now). Its fast (its used for all kinds of protocols), and is capable of 128 bit keys which means its still very secure.
Code:
128-bit = 2^128 = 2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2 = 339,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (Possible Keys)

I would look up how RC4 works to get an idea of what to aim for. Its easy to say there is competition for you, as any new encryption would have to be better then today's standard to be worth while. It would be nice to see a OCN member come up with a entirely new legitimate encryption, but given how old today's standard encryption's are (without any new ones popping up for many years), I just don't see it happening. I guess the main reason behind it, is encryption's are meant to be confidential. The people who usually make them are the ones who are trying to protect something such as game client files from hackers etc.
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post #63 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by SIMPSONATOR View Post

I forgot SHA was a hash function.
I'm simply saying any encryption can be broken, given time and a brute force attack, and knowing a few key words or phrases. The point is, I could create a program to encrypt messages using my own encryption (dubbed PME1). The receiver would use the same program. Even if the eavesdropper had my program, without the key it would be very difficult to decrypt the message.

Not every encryption can be brute-forced. A simple Caesar Cipher would be unbreakable via brute-force guessing (though a simple frequency count would break the cipher). A brute-force method only works if there is a repeating key (or key pattern) who's length is less than the encrypted information.

The only truly uncrackable ciphers are written using a one-time pad. Here's an idea (though impractical) of a truly uncrackable system. Suppose you buy a harddrive and overwrite it with (perfectly) random data. Along with this harddrive you purchase another drive of identical size (and for sake of simple discussion, bit entropy is accounted for). The random harddrive is assigned to read-only while the other drive is written to. By using XOR logic, it is possible to use the random harddrive as a one-time pad for the other harddrive. Both drives would appear random when separate, but when brought together (and if the appropriate software and XOR pattern is used) the drives would function normally.
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