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Amd phenom ii 1100t, oc @ 4.2ghz prime 95 stress test.

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
Hello im not sure if this is in the right forum sorry if its not.

Okay im new to overcloking so ya I have a short question.

Currently stress testing my cpu with prime 95, so it stress test the 6 core right, and after 4-5 min the core #5 and #6 worker stopped.

Im willing to know if this is normal or does it mean that my system is unstable or something.
post #2 of 20
If all workers remain stable for 12 hours, your overclock should be mostly stable.
Obviously, yours is not. tongue.gif
post #3 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by crust_cheese View Post

If all workers remain stable for 12 hours, your overclock should be mostly stable.
Obviously, yours is not. tongue.gif

Okay so when some of the core stop being stress tested this mena I need to underclock a bit okay.

Here one more question heard that a 1100t can be oced till your temp reach 55c. Im actualy staying under 45c liquid cooled. How come it became unstable at 16.5 x 250 even if it doesnt go over 46c.
post #4 of 20
CPUs are not only heat-restricted. I am not a VLSI engineer, but you can imagine that a CPU has a lot of potential points of failure.
I could imagine that some transistors, for example, simply don't manage switching fast enough at overclocked clock speeds. Or something.

Since you've adjusted the ref. clock, have you also lowered the CPU/NB multiplier? If it's overclocked and you haven't properly set the voltage or clock speed, it might also be responsible for some failures.
Edited by crust_cheese - 2/10/12 at 3:44pm
post #5 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by crust_cheese View Post

CPUs are not only heat-restricted. I am not a microprocessor engineer, but you can imagine that a CPU has a lot of potential points of failure.
I could imagine that some transistors, for example, simply don't manage switching fast enough at overclocked clock speeds. Or something.
Since you've adjusted the ref. clock, have you also lowered the CPU/NB multiplier? If it's overclocked and you haven't properly set the voltage or clock speed, it might also be responsible for some failures.

I think my motherboad lock the multiplier oc, It's an uefi bios, asus M5A99X Evo motherboard.

My vcore voltage is at 1.464v sometime it goes up to 1.474 automaticly tought even if I set it at 1.464.

I lowered the fsb at 248 and for now its stable this way.

But u said lowered the cpu multiplier nb.
Edited by TheUnatural - 2/10/12 at 3:51pm
post #6 of 20
On a M5A99X, the CPU/NB multiplier should be adjustable, I think (just for clarification, note that CPU/NB isn't the same as either CPU or NB).
The default CPU/NB multiplier is 10x. If you've increased reference clock to 250 MHz, the new CPU/NB clock would be 10 times 250 MHz = 2'500 MHz.
Now, do keep in mind that, as most anything, the CPU/NB requires more voltage when overclocked.
If you didn't pump more voltage into it, it might've been responsible for your crashes. That's why, when overclocking, you try to keep everything the same except for the part you're tuning - so that there is only one source of error.
post #7 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by crust_cheese View Post

On a M5A99X, the CPU/NB multiplier should be adjustable, I think (just for clarification, note that CPU/NB isn't the same as either CPU or NB).
The default CPU/NB multiplier is 10x. If you've increased reference clock to 250 MHz, the new CPU/NB clock would be 10 times 250 MHz = 2'500 MHz.
Now, do keep in mind that, as most anything, the CPU/NB requires more voltage when overclocked.
If you didn't pump more voltage into it, it might've been responsible for your crashes. That's why, when overclocking, you try to keep everything the same except for the part you're tuning - so that there is only one source of error.

I realy can't find where to adjust the cpu multiplier in my bios for the M5A99X. If I brg my vcore voltage to 1.5, then there something that will make it even go higher by like .015-.025 its prolly a bios setting that I need to turn of so the voltage doesnt vary.

I have a 1050w psu, so I can allow myself to brg the voltage up, as well as a corsair 100h liquid cooling that keep the temp under 55c witch from what I saw is the max you want to keep ur pc stable on an 1100t.

Tryed to up the multiplier tru ai suite 2, and everytime I do so even if it barely by .5. From 16.5 to 17 and lower the fsb to like 200 from 248, I'll get a blue screen. So im sure off that its impossible for a M5A99X to adjust the multiplier.
post #8 of 20
That kind of motherboard should have a nb frequency multiplier.

uefi bios shouldn't require anything special to make adjustments to the cpu-nb.

Your issue could be ram related (either via the cpunb, or it might be clocked too high). What's your ram frequency and timings?

**edit: mixed uefi bios up with something else, still shouldn't affect the cpunb multiplier
Edited by spacestation - 2/10/12 at 7:24pm
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post #9 of 20
Thread Starter 
It seen like I can adjust the multiplier finaly.

It is more stable this way and by far.

But I have one question I know there some power consumption tool that I can desable in the bios and some core unlocker option that I can enable as well. Seen like when im not running any heavy program an option in the bios will reduce the multiplier to x 4 put down the freuqency to like 900mhz and lower the voltage to 1.275 from 1.465.

Im willing to know with option I need to disable in the bios to not allow that power saving thing.
post #10 of 20
Try finding a thread with discussions on your mb, they generally have tips on which settings to enable and disable for optimal oc performance.
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RAMRAMHard DriveHard Drive
Mushkin  Mushkin  OCZ Vertex 2 50GB SandForce Standard HD 
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RAMRAMHard DriveHard Drive
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