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post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plan9 View Post

FTPS is complete garbage:

Opinion.
Quote:
* it doesn't encrypt the data channels

Untrue. The original implementation did not, but that was WAY long ago. FTPS most certainly does encrypt data, but it is up to the client whether or not to enable data encryption.
Quote:
* it doesn't work when both the client and server are behind a NAT (which basically makes it useless online)

proof.gif

My FTP server is setup as FTPS. The above works perfectly fine for me.
Quote:
* and if you're only using it internally, it's massively inferior to other network file systems (eg NFS, SMB, SSHFS, etc) in every single way (speed, features, reliability, etc)

Why on Earth would you use any FTP service if you're already exposing the shares via Samba? Except...oh...wait for it.....to learn! Shock and awe! And what's the OP doing? Learning you say? Truly shocking!.

Quote:
SFTP is by far a better choice for online and NFS or SMB is far better for internal networks. The only danger of SFTP is it doesn't chroot by default, but even that can easily be fixed

Again, once you know how to use it, yes. For a beginner chroots are not a walk in the park.
    
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post #12 of 17
I wish I had experience with a FTP server (or ssh of that matter tongue.gif) but if I were to implement it, I would do it in Arch Linux because I am most familiar it. However, I recommend that you use the distribution that will have the smallest learning curve. Debian/Ubuntu, Fedora, OpenSUSE, CentOS all have mature package managers, you'll just want to find some guides that tell you how to do it.
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post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by TurboTurtle View Post

vsftpd can facilitate FTPS, which for a home environment is perfectly sufficient. It's also much easier to setup and manage chroots and the like through vsftpd than SSH's config.
Now SFTP is more secure, yes - and if you're familiar with it can be easy to setup, but I'd say for just getting functionality down going the easy route first (especially since this is his first Linux encounter) would be best. Start easy, progressively get more complex as you become more proficient.

um, there really isn't any setup with SFTP, as long as you've already started ssh. The ssh server will handle sftp connections. So you just have to know your local user/pass. I don't know why you would want to setup another program, to do built in stuff.
post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by TurboTurtle View Post

Opinion.
Not really. FTP is garbage. It's an outdated protocol which is a pig to develop for as every server seems to adhere to their own standards (hence why many clients give the option to select the FTP server OS) and doesn't make clear distinction between the roles of a client and server (as I'll explain later). FTPS is a lousy extension to FTP which does nothing to resolve any of these issues. Even SFTP doesn't, however at least the tunnelling works around the routing issues (which again, I'll explain below).
Quote:
Originally Posted by TurboTurtle View Post

[proof]
My FTP server is setup as FTPS. The above works perfectly fine for me.
Good for you - however your anecdotal evidence means nothing.

You want proof, then read the RFC: It's not just a client / server arrangement (in fact RFC 959 makes no mention of clients at all). It does some weird stuff where the FTP client makes a request on port 21 and then the server responds by connecting back to the clients. (bare in mind that FTP was designed during the days of trust online, there were no firewalls, no network address translations - just no need for any of that). This causes use problems for any FTP server and/or client when they're sat behind a firewall so what generally happens these days is firewalls work intelligently, detect an outgoing connection on port 21 and then adaptively routes incoming sockets from the destination FTP server to the client. More secure firewalls will to some basic packet inspecting to ensure the correct incoming port and only that port is routed back. This cannot happen with FTP(E)S as the authentication process because the packets are encrypted. So firewalls would have to implicitly trust incoming connections regardless of the port (bad) or flat out refuse FTPS (and this is even assuming you have an adaptive firewall - which many aren't).

SFTP doesn't have the client / server negotiation issue as it's all sent down an SSH tunnel.

So while FTPS might work for you when both your client and server are NATed / firewalled, there's absolutely no guarantee it will work anywhere else (in fact quite the opposite - a good chance it will not)
Quote:
Originally Posted by TurboTurtle View Post

Untrue. The original implementation did not, but that was WAY long ago. FTPS most certainly does encrypt data, but it is up to the client whether or not to enable data encryption.
yes, but it's an optional extra you have to enable - SFTP which encrypts by default
Quote:
Originally Posted by TurboTurtle View Post

Why on Earth would you use any FTP service if you're already exposing the shares via Samba? Except...oh...wait for it.....to learn! Shock and awe! And what's the OP doing? Learning you say? Truly shocking!
Well then it would be better to learn to set up a decent protocol rather than a lousy one wink.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by TurboTurtle View Post

Again, once you know how to use it, yes. For a beginner chroots are not a walk in the park.
Chroot isn't hard to set up and you keep making the point that he wants to learn. So why not learn to set up a server correctly?
post #15 of 17
Thread Starter 
thinking.gif so.......
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post #16 of 17
If you're looking for a learning experience, you can use a number of distributions' as long as you use the minimal install and take the time to learn each thing. If you want to learn for work reasons you would be at an advantage to pick up a commercially used distribution such as Debian, CentOS, etc...

If you just want an easy solution with a GUI that helps you manage, there are many things specifically for servers like FreeNAS, but you could also just use pretty much any desktop distribution you feel comfortable with, even though it might not be 100% most efficient solution.

As for the FTPS vs SFTP debate, if you have the ability to make a decision between the two, use SFTP. Technologies like telnet and FTP should be dead by now, not bootstrapped with features to attempt to preserve their lifespan.
post #17 of 17
CentOS is the most popular linux server from what I've been seeing but I prefer Ubuntu just because I am used to it.

If I were you, I'd get a cheap VPS. I rent mine for $1/month and run apache2 (web), vsftpd (ftp), php, and teamspeak 3 off of it.

PM me if you want more info
    
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