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Best C++ Compiler - Page 2

post #11 of 33
Thread Starter 
Oh that's perfect Duckie.

Do you know if individual students can purchase the student/academic edition or if they need to go through their institution?

Also, what are the benefits of using an IDE over a compiler and vice versa?

And please confirm this: VS10 is only compatible and only works with Windows systems. Does Intel C++ only work on Intel based chipsets? I'm so confused. :x

Should I use Code::Blocks instead? I would eventually like to dive into developing mobile applications later on (once I learn enough) so something versatile would be nice.
Edited by xyeLz - 2/14/12 at 12:49pm
post #12 of 33
When I first started I used Visual Studio 2008 but then moved to just coding in Notepad++ and compiling on a Unix server.

I've been using Eclipse for Java and it's GREAT, it does a lot of things for you and makes programming just a little easier. Eclipse also makes a compiler for C++ so I'd definitely look at that.
    
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post #13 of 33
If you don't want an IDE, say you're happy with coding in Vi/notepad++ just get one of the basics...

GCC (platform agnostic, quite forgiving of developer quirks)

Intel's compiler (very efficient if targetting Intel CPUs, but almost 'anti-optimises' for AMD)

AMD compiler (not tried personally)

Microsoft compiler (get via free Visual Studio Express editions, or paid for... whichever)

I compile most of my code in Visual Studio, because it's where I write it normally. Unless I'm targetting linux/BSD, in which case I'll compile with gcc.
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post #14 of 33
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paradigm Shifter View Post

If you don't want an IDE, say you're happy with coding in Vi/notepad++ just get one of the basics...
GCC (platform agnostic, quite forgiving of developer quirks)
Intel's compiler (very efficient if targetting Intel CPUs, but almost 'anti-optimises' for AMD)
AMD compiler (not tried personally)
Microsoft compiler (get via free Visual Studio Express editions, or paid for... whichever)
I compile most of my code in Visual Studio, because it's where I write it normally. Unless I'm targetting linux/BSD, in which case I'll compile with gcc.

I tried downloading GCC because it seems to be the "overall" consensus when it comes to C++, but I can't for the life of me figure out how to download/install/get it in general.

Just out of curiosity, you say you use VS because you write there normally, but why did you end up using that over the others you listed to begin with?

Oh, and how do you open the compiler itself? Lol. I installed the Intel one and the one from MinGW and I have no idea where to start. I don't see a shortcut for any command prompts. headscratch.gif
Edited by xyeLz - 2/14/12 at 1:26pm
post #15 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by xyeLz View Post

Oh that's perfect Duckie.
Do you know if individual students can purchase the student/academic edition or if they need to go through their institution?
Also, what are the benefits of using an IDE over a compiler and vice versa?
And please confirm this: VS10 is only compatible and only works with Windows systems. Does Intel C++ only work on Intel based chipsets? I'm so confused. :x
Should I use Code::Blocks instead? I would eventually like to dive into developing mobile applications later on (once I learn enough) so something versatile would be nice.

Code:Blocks uses a version of GCC as a compiler by default.
An IDE is a fancy text editor with syntax checking and it usually can allow you to compile with a click of a button(keep in mind that the IDE doesn't have the compiler, it usually comes with one/downloads one though).
The Intel C++ compiler works on all x86 CPUs, but last time I checked, it checks if the CPU is Intel and if it isn't, it chooses the least optimum code path.
Code compiled with the compiler packaged with Visual Studio works on systems that have the .NET framework(.NET is Microsoft, so its only supported on Windows), but there's a project that aims to be compatible with the .NET framework called Mono(its cross platform) Mono for the most part is compatible with .NET code, if you really want Mono compatibility, use only the libraries listed in the Mono documentation or just use their compiler(there's a Mono IDE called MonoDevelop). I use VS and just make sure its Mono compatible when I want to develop cross platform (which is most of the time)
If you're looking for a free C++ compile just to get off the ground, you can use MinGW (a Windows port of GCC), or GCC(which is packaged in all Linux distro's package repositories).

Other notes: stay away from Managed C++, which is Microsoft's variant of C++ that it likes to use for VS auto generated stuff on occasion.
If you develop mobile applications, your toolset with vary with the platform:
iPhone - Some sort of Mac tools which I am unfamiliar with that you need Obj C for(requires a Mac)
Android - requires a Java compiler, as for an IDE, I suggest Eclipse the Android SDK has plugins for Eclipse
Windows Phone - requires Visual Studio
Edited by lin2dev - 2/14/12 at 3:52pm
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post #16 of 33
Thread Starter 
Back to IDEs (I clearly can't figure out compilers). I created a list of a few that I read were some of the best. Please make changes and correct what I am saying or add your own. Then please offer your input into which you would use. I'm not really into the thought of using more than one IDE at this point unless theres a clearcut best Java and C++ IDE, and most of everything I do will be on Windows until I reformat and dual-boot into Linux (which will be another thread about choosing a distro later on).

Visual Studio: The best on Windows, for Windows.
IntelliJ: The best for Java.
Eclipse: Overall good for beginners but not that great later on.
Netbeans: Fantastic for both Java and C++ with a great interface (important to me).
Kdevelop: Most simple and good for beginners also with a great variety of features.

I'm not sure if some of those are OS specific except for VS, but I am leaning most towards Netbeans since it seems to get great reviews for both Java and C++, and if I will get into mobile apps, wouldn't Java be a must?
post #17 of 33
A compiler is simply a program that is used to transform / translate higher level source code (C++, C#, Java, etc.) into a lower level language (assembly, machine code, etc.).
Conversely a decompiler is used to translate low-level code to high level code.
A compiler generally has no GUI, and can be used directly through the command prompt.

An IDE (Integrated Development Environment) simply provides a suite of tools to help the developer build source code in a specific (one or more) language, and generally implements a compiler on the back end so that you can do everything directly in the IDE.

I think your biggest issue is that you are stressing too much over the details. You already have VS2010, so just start using it to code C++. VS provides a great enviornment that makes it easy to just straight up start coding. You dont have to worry about how your directory structure is set up, how its going to compile or link, since its all done for you (well you can tweak all of that, but you don't have to).
Quote:
Originally Posted by xyeLz View Post

Visual Studio: The best on Windows, for Windows.
IntelliJ: The best for Java.
Eclipse: Overall good for beginners but not that great later on.
Netbeans: Fantastic for both Java and C++ with a great interface (important to me).
Kdevelop: Most simple and good for beginners also with a great variety of features.
I'm not sure if some of those are OS specific except for VS, but I am leaning most towards Netbeans since it seems to get great reviews for both Java and C++, and if I will get into mobile apps, wouldn't Java be a must?

Netbeans is just as bloated as VS, and in my opinion the environment sucks.
For Java development, Sun Microsystems links directly to Netbeans from their website. So take that for what it is.
We have small Java projects where I work, and the IDE used is Eclipse. Not my personal choice, but it wasn't my choice. (I wouldn't have even gone with Java ...)
I've only ever had experience with Kdevelop in Ubuntu Linux, at least I think it was Kdevelop, and I wasn't impressed.

The best IDE for you is the one that helps you the most, and restricts you the least.

As far as mobile development goes, in my opinion you are getting way ahead of yourself at this point.
Also, the language depends on the platform you want to develop for.
iOS = Objective C
Andriod = Java
Windows Mobile = C# .NET
Blackberry = Java?

Ultimately learning a new coding language is easy part. The best approach is to pick one language/environemnt to start with and stick to it. Over time you will build up a strong base of design concepts. Once your comfortable, all/most of those concepts are easily transfered to whatever new language you want to learn, and all you have to do is learn the language syntax, APIs and SDKs.
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post #18 of 33
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kl1X View Post

A compiler is simply a program that is used to transform / translate higher level source code (C++, C#, Java, etc.) into a lower level language (assembly, machine code, etc.).
Conversely a decompiler is used to translate low-level code to high level code.
A compiler generally has no GUI, and can be used directly through the command prompt.
An IDE (Integrated Development Environment) simply provides a suite of tools to help the developer build source code in a specific (one or more) language, and generally implements a compiler on the back end so that you can do everything directly in the IDE.
I think your biggest issue is that you are stressing too much over the details. You already have VS2010, so just start using it to code C++. VS provides a great enviornment that makes it easy to just straight up start coding. You dont have to worry about how your directory structure is set up, how its going to compile or link, since its all done for you (well you can tweak all of that, but you don't have to).
Netbeans is just as bloated as VS, and in my opinion the environment sucks.
For Java development, Sun Microsystems links directly to Netbeans from their website. So take that for what it is.
We have small Java projects where I work, and the IDE used is Eclipse. Not my personal choice, but it wasn't my choice. (I wouldn't have even gone with Java ...)
I've only ever had experience with Kdevelop in Ubuntu Linux, at least I think it was Kdevelop, and I wasn't impressed.
The best IDE for you is the one that helps you the most, and restricts you the least.
As far as mobile development goes, in my opinion you are getting way ahead of yourself at this point.
Also, the language depends on the platform you want to develop for.
iOS = Objective C
Andriod = Java
Windows Mobile = C# .NET
Blackberry = Java?
Ultimately learning a new coding language is easy part. The best approach is to pick one language/environemnt to start with and stick to it. Over time you will build up a strong base of design concepts. Once your comfortable, all/most of those concepts are easily transfered to whatever new language you want to learn, and all you have to do is learn the language syntax, APIs and SDKs.

Thanks mate. I actually have VS at work so I was looking for something at home if this helps to clarify. This is one of the reasons I am getting so confused I think - the fact that it's all set up at work and at home I have no idea where to start - and I would like to do it properly.

The reason I went with NetBeans is because they offer a specific C++ version, or a Java one if I so choose. It also seems to be the most similar looking to VS at work. I still have no idea where to start but I'm assuming I am going to still need a compiler to be able to start something in C++ because I don't think NetBeans installed one. Comments here?

Is objective C the same thing as C (as opposed to C++)? I think I would really like to start with C/C++ (mostly C++) and move into Java later on but if you think differently please let me know. You said you wouldn't have even picked Java so I'm not sure why is all. smile.gif

Should I snag the GCC compiler from MinGW and manually install that? I guess my biggest problem is that since I'm starting out literally with no knowledge of this at all except for the fact that I need a compiler is that I just need some simple guidance. frown.gif
Edited by xyeLz - 2/15/12 at 11:27am
post #19 of 33
Netbeans will have installed a compiler for whichever language packages you chose to install. So assuming you went the the Java package and the C++ package, then you will already have compilers for both.

In general you should never need to install a compiler separately from the IDE. I only phrase it that way because even though I've never seen an IDE that came without a compiler, I guess anything is possible.

I don't really know much about Objective C, but according wikipedia it is a superset of C. In other words a C program can be compiled by an objective C compiler, but objective C contains some additions on top of the standard C language that prevent it from being compiled by a C compiler.

There's nothing really wrong with Java, I just don't like it personally. Also, my comment about not chooseing Java was mostly a rant about work. biggrin.gif We are basically a .NET shop, but somewhere along the way someone decided to build a couple apps in Java that we now have to support.

Choosing a starting language is a highly debated topic. I can only really tell you what I've seen work. Personally, my first programming experience was with C++, and then going into college the curriculum started us with a semester of C, and then we transitioned into C++. We also branched out into a number of other languages, (Python, Java, Assembly, C#) for little projects here and there. I've heard people swear that Python or VB.NET is the best language to learn. I tend to think those languages hold your hand too much, and promote bad habits. But seeing as you are looking to start with C/C++, i'd say go for it. The transition from C++ to Java is fairly easy since both are Object-Oriented languages, so that should be a good path.
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post #20 of 33
Thread Starter 
Kl1x I'll read the entirety of that when I get home in about an hour. As for now, here's my issue:

compiler.png

Perhaps it is because I did not install the MYSY (or whatever it's called) thing it wanted to install? Should I have done this? Is that a compiler? Should I just install the MinGW compiler?
Edited by xyeLz - 2/15/12 at 6:44pm
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