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Swapping microswitches for "dummies" - Page 9

post #81 of 98
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Quote:
Originally Posted by granitov View Post

Considering it doesn't weight much and that it always tends to move around from the smallest pressure it ain't much better when using them. Vice is much easier to use when a task requires precision.

you just have to screw it tight properly, which is not the most comfortable thing with these things, but still it works, and it's much more flexible(literally) to work with than with vice.
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post #82 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by Diogenes5 View Post

1) I would not put hot solder on all 3 connectors of the original microswitch at once. Doing this, I feel unduly risks the contacts on the PCB and adds to the mess you have to cleanup. My method (suggested by Huff), was using a desoldering iron (found at Radio Shack or online). Mine was 45W.

What you want to do is heat up the iron for a few minutes and then place it right over the tip of one of your microswitch connectors (be sure to have the pump depressed as you are going to be sucking up excess solder). Then apply a little bit of fresh solder (I used 60/40). This will melt instantly and connect your iron to the switch. Push in the iron so that the tip is almost touching the mouse PCB. This will connect your molten solder to the mouse’s original solder and melt that solder as well after a few seconds. If you have bought the “third hand” device (which you should have, it’s dirt cheap and extremely useful), you will be able to see the original solder melt through the magnifying glass. After a few seconds, release the pump of the desoldering iron and all of the molten metal will be sucked up (the solder you added + the original solder on the mouse).

I find that this method risks less direct heat to the PCB and works across more different types of mice (some mice I experimented on had very temperature resistant solder that would simply not melt with direct application of the desoldering iron. Adding my own solder on top remedied that).

2) After this is done, let the switch rest for a minute or two and you should be able to “wiggle” it in its hole by grabbing onto it in order to know that it is loose. After doing all 3 microswitch contacts with this method, the entire microswitch should come out rather easily.
Which desoldering iron did you use and how much did it cost?

Also, does everyone agree this is the best method for desoldering/removing switches? Any other tips?

I've learned that soldering on new ones is a piece of cake, but removing them can be a real PITA and I've messed up a PCB already (contact ring and the inside of the hole thing came off along with the pin...).
post #83 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by early View Post

Which desoldering iron did you use and how much did it cost?

Also, does everyone agree this is the best method for desoldering/removing switches? Any other tips?

I've learned that soldering on new ones is a piece of cake, but removing them can be a real PITA and I've messed up a PCB already (contact ring and the inside of the hole thing came off along with the pin...).

YOU DON"T want a desoldering iron, unless it's a $500 desoldering station w/ real good suction/blowing


On the budget side. Get a Soldapult, it's a large spring loaded suction tube.. LARGE is very important, bigger spring, more suction..

Do not use one of those mini versions..

thumb.gif
post #84 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by early View Post

Which desoldering iron did you use and how much did it cost?

Also, does everyone agree this is the best method for desoldering/removing switches? Any other tips?

I've learned that soldering on new ones is a piece of cake, but removing them can be a real PITA and I've messed up a PCB already (contact ring and the inside of the hole thing came off along with the pin...).

I use a cheap 40W DuraTool iron. Cost me about £7, I think. I even use the tip that came with it.

This is the best method that I've come across and it's sooooooooooo easy once you understand what's going on in the pictures. Putting a huge blob of solder across all 3 pins, then touching the blob with the iron tip makes the switch just fall right out.

Edit: I also use some copper desoldering braid and a desoldering pump. Very handy to have.
post #85 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by m0uz View Post

I use a cheap 40W DuraTool iron. Cost me about £7, I think. I even use the tip that came with it.

This is the best method that I've come across and it's sooooooooooo easy once you understand what's going on in the pictures. Putting a huge blob of solder across all 3 pins, then touching the blob with the iron tip makes the switch just fall right out.

Edit: I also use some copper desoldering braid and a desoldering pump. Very handy to have.


The trouble with those is that the have slow suction.. so you need to do the thing where you put more solder on..

Increasing the Total heat exposure of the parts involved..


Mice often have bottom barrel PCB quality , so the longer you put heat to it, you are very likely to burn or lift a trace..


Which is why I think spring loaded soldering pump is the way to go because it's faster, and you can remove heat more quickly..



It might not matter to electronics with better pcb quality or Much thicker traces.
post #86 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by tp4tissue View Post

The trouble with those is that the have slow suction.. so you need to do the thing where you put more solder on..

Increasing the Total heat exposure of the parts involved..


Mice often have bottom barrel PCB quality , so the longer you put heat to it, you are very likely to burn or lift a trace..


Which is why I think spring loaded soldering pump is the way to go because it's faster, and you can remove heat more quickly..



It might not matter to electronics with better pcb quality or Much thicker traces.

I've burnt off traces and those contact rings in the past because of overheating, but those were on old cheap mice that I used for practice. Once I found thunda's method, I haven't had any problems. Thus far, anyway. Also, what soldering pump are you talking about? Isn't a desoldering pump the same thing?
post #87 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by m0uz View Post

I've burnt off traces and those contact rings in the past because of overheating, but those were on old cheap mice that I used for practice. Once I found thunda's method, I haven't had any problems. Thus far, anyway. Also, what soldering pump are you talking about? Isn't a desoldering pump the same thing?

No, not a desoldering iron..

I'm talking about the Soldapullt 3.. it's an independent Suction device

It's made by Edsyn..


It's like a Reverse syringe, that has a big spring on the inside, the BIG version is the one to get, it has way more suction than the smaller iterations or various clones.

The Center plunger shaft can also be lubricated for even more suction.. They Do not come fully lubed out of the box, because lubricant tends to run..




Edited by tp4tissue - 7/23/16 at 8:45am
post #88 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by tp4tissue View Post

No, not a desoldering iron..

I'm talking about the Soldapullt 3.. it's an independent Suction device

It's made by Edsyn..


It's like a Reverse syringe, that has a big spring on the inside, the BIG version is the one to get, it has way more suction than the smaller iterations or various clones.

The Center plunger shaft can also be lubricated for even more suction.. They Do not come fully lubed out of the box, because lubricant tends to run..




I'm not talking about a desoldering iron either, I'm talking about a desoldering pump which happens to be the exact same thing as the Soldapullt except 10x less expensive tongue.gif

post #89 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by m0uz View Post

I'm not talking about a desoldering iron either, I'm talking about a desoldering pump which happens to be the exact same thing as the Soldapullt except 10x less expensive tongue.gif


Yea you don't want to use that small one.

It doesn't suck as good.. hahahahahahaha


You don't have to get the official solderpult, but get a clone that's at least the same SIZE..

The larger chamber and larger plunger offers more suction power.. It's all about the suction..
post #90 of 98
wouldnt a desoldering braid be the best? ive tried those cheap desoldering pumps and I have ruined many mice, lol. need to work on my desoldering skills , i find that its actually harder to remove switches then to actually solder them on..
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