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lightning strike - help

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 
I need some advice. Anyone out there have any experience with lightning damage to computers? Everything was clear and suddenly from nowhere lightning struck somewhere near and I heard a pop and my computer shuts down. Nothing else plugged into the strip was affected. My guess is that its either the power supply or the motherboard.

I jumped the PSU and the fan came on but it made a intermittent popping sound every second or so. I stopped the fan to see if it was an electrical pop or mechanical and the fan quit working all together.

I had a corsair 650TX which is supposed to have overvoltage/current protection though I dont know if that is internal or for external voltage/current spikes.

I ordered a new PSU and Im hoping it fixes the problem. If not, what are the chances that its the motherboard or another component all together?

Thanks
Integra
(14 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX 8120 Bulldozer GA-990FXA-UD3 EVGA 8800GT 8gb(2x4) 1866 GSkill Sniper 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
2x250GB & 1x1TB Samsung Water Cooled Windows 7 Ultimate/Ubuntu 10.04 
MonitorPowerCaseMouse
19" ws 1440 x 900 Rosewill Green series 630W Apevia X-Navigator, DIY Custom Logitech MX518 
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Integra
(14 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX 8120 Bulldozer GA-990FXA-UD3 EVGA 8800GT 8gb(2x4) 1866 GSkill Sniper 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
2x250GB & 1x1TB Samsung Water Cooled Windows 7 Ultimate/Ubuntu 10.04 
MonitorPowerCaseMouse
19" ws 1440 x 900 Rosewill Green series 630W Apevia X-Navigator, DIY Custom Logitech MX518 
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post #2 of 4
Surge damage (generally) affects the components in the following order. If a component lower on this list is affected, then most likely all higher components are also affected:
  1. PSU
  2. Mobo
  3. CPU/RAM
  4. GPU
  5. HDD/Optical Drives
  6. Fans and other accesories

Now, there are obviously exceptions to this, and in general it stops after mobo, but it really depends on what your hardware is, how sensitive it is to overvolt/current, and how strong the overvolt/current event was.
post #3 of 4
Thread Starter 
Thanks Nick,

Do you know if the overvolt protection for my power supply would apply to electrical surges from the outlet?
Integra
(14 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX 8120 Bulldozer GA-990FXA-UD3 EVGA 8800GT 8gb(2x4) 1866 GSkill Sniper 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
2x250GB & 1x1TB Samsung Water Cooled Windows 7 Ultimate/Ubuntu 10.04 
MonitorPowerCaseMouse
19" ws 1440 x 900 Rosewill Green series 630W Apevia X-Navigator, DIY Custom Logitech MX518 
  hide details  
Reply
Integra
(14 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX 8120 Bulldozer GA-990FXA-UD3 EVGA 8800GT 8gb(2x4) 1866 GSkill Sniper 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
2x250GB & 1x1TB Samsung Water Cooled Windows 7 Ultimate/Ubuntu 10.04 
MonitorPowerCaseMouse
19" ws 1440 x 900 Rosewill Green series 630W Apevia X-Navigator, DIY Custom Logitech MX518 
  hide details  
Reply
post #4 of 4
My understanding of Overvolt/current protection is to prevent the output voltages/currents from the PSU from getting to high. This could be because of either a change in load with the internal mechanisms of the PSU, or an external surge. However, I have no idea how effective that protection is from an event like a lightening strike.
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