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what type of airflow do i have? *carefully drawn diagram included* - Page 2

post #11 of 18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by psyclum View Post

improvement is a relative thing. haf is notorious in having little to no air filter so it's engineered to be a dust magnet. if you cut down your airflow by adding air filters, you should consider adding more intake, OR reducing exhaust. IMO taping off the top rear exhaust fan will actually help in the overall airflow pattern of the case. this way you only have 1 exhaust on top (draws heat from the RAM sticks) and 1 exhaust rear (your H60 rad which also draws heat from your VRM'S) this SHOULD make your case more balanced and improve overall thermal efficiency. you won't see a drop in temp, but you will see a drop in overall sound and dust level.
if you are REALLY fixated in getting more cooling, you can buy a higher quality 200mm fan to be mounted in the front replacing the 2x120mm fans you have currently there. switch the side panel fan out to a high quality 140mm fan instead, and maybe add a 3x5.25 bay fan cage like this
496
for additional cooling
however. IMO that is way overkill for your system. you wouldn't be using a HAF 912 if you have THAT much heat being produced in the system biggrin.gif most likely your existing thermal solution is perfectly fine and you are just nit picking trying to justify the $ you spent on fans you didn't actually need biggrin.gif

i already have 3 of these: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835103073

i got them from a cm sniper case, thats the reason for the haf 912 i am downgrading because the sniper is to large and has to many cables and a low amount of cable management possibilities. i just want to make sure that the first time i set it up is the last time.

i have 6 of the 120mm fans 3 of those 200mm fans a random antec two cool 140mm fan the stock 120mm h60 fan and i think thats about it lol
post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by psyclum View Post

all i'm saying is it doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that if you had 3 filtered intake fans vs 3 unfiltered exhaust fans the unfiltered exhaust fans will win... you are correct in saying that there are alot of variables involved. however, simple math also comes into play here. if you had 70cfm intake fans that are cut down to 50cfm due to filters, and you had the same 70cfm fans on the exhaust side... there is a difference of 20cfm in exhaust airflow that will contribute to a pressure differential resulting in negative pressure. that negative pressure will contribute to the change in airflow pattern in the case turning some exhaust ports (slow spinning PSU fans) into intake ports. which attract dust in areas you do not want.

We can speculate but it doesn't mean much. We have no idea how much air any of the fans are actually moving thru the case - individually or combined. That's why I clarified the point. We simply don't know without measuring or testing. That's why we test. wink.gif
Edited by AMD4ME - 3/5/12 at 8:56pm
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Itsonme View Post

i already have 3 of these: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835103073
i got them from a cm sniper case, thats the reason for the haf 912 i am downgrading because the sniper is to large and has to many cables and a low amount of cable management possibilities. i just want to make sure that the first time i set it up is the last time.
i have 6 of the 120mm fans 3 of those 200mm fans a random antec two cool 140mm fan the stock 120mm h60 fan and i think thats about it lol

general rule of thumb, whenever possible, try using larger fans. larger fans push ALOT more air (cfm) per decibel generated.

what most people fail to realize when designing a thermal solution for their computer is it's NOT the amount of cooling you can get, it's the amount of cooling you need while achieving the lowest decibel level. your thermal solution should NOT deter you from using your computer. if you have a very LOUD computer, it limits the amount of time you are able to use your computer per day before being stressed out by the white noise. on a quiet system, you might be able to use the computer for 14 to 16 hrs a day. but on a loud computer, you might only be able to use it for 4 hrs before the noise gets on your nerves.
post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdr09 View Post

i think the fans at the top of the case should be sucking in air from the outside.

yes, agreed.
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post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by theamdman View Post

yes, agreed.

It depends on numerous factors. That's why you need to test each specific case. Trying to blow the hot air inside the case downward when it naturally wants to rise, doesn't usually work well for overall cooling but only testing will tell what is best.
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by theamdman View Post

yes, agreed.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdr09 View Post

i think the fans at the top of the case should be sucking in air from the outside.

it depends on where the case is located. if the case is located in a semi enclosed area such as a under a desk where the exhaust hot air is trapped by the desktop, then sucking hot air in from the top will simply recirculate that hot air back into the case creating a thermal short circuit.

however if the case is placed in a fairly open area where there is plenty of room on the back of the machine for the hot exhaust to be vented off w/o too much hot air mixing, then top side intake is viable and sometimes necessary step for overclocking. the ideal situation would be to build a custom shroud of some sort (plastic milk jug + electrical tape if you don't mind the looks biggrin.gif ) so that the air intake from the top will be coming from the front side of the case to minimize the mixing of hot exhaust air in the back of the case.
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdr09 View Post

i think the fans at the top of the case should be sucking in air from the outside.
Quote:
Originally Posted by AMD4ME View Post

It depends on numerous factors. That's why you need to test each specific case. Trying to blow the hot air inside the case downward when it naturally wants to rise, doesn't usually work well for overall cooling but only testing will tell what is best.

I used to accept that, but blowing fans really do push warm air any way if you have a good route to the exhaust.

What I want is for the CPU and GPU to get the outside air first, then the exhausts would be wherever is farthest away.

This became obvious one day after I turned my case upside down trying to get the presumably rising hot air to move better through my system. There was no change while it was upside down, so I turned it back and reversed all the fans for the best setup I've ever had.

edit: one idea is to point your CPU cooler down, if you can, which will:

1. Stop your CPU from sucking air right up from the hottest thing in your case
2. Possibly improve your GPU temp, or possibly screw with it's cooler's own flow depending on the type.
Edited by samwiches - 3/6/12 at 10:06pm
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post #18 of 18
Testing is the only means to see what actually works best for each application.
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