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How to install Linux? - Page 2

post #11 of 36
It is up to you, but personally i would say Gnome for a business setting
post #12 of 36
Note that usually you can use yum to install the other, meaning if when you did your initial setup and installed GNOME you can add KDE later and then just choose which session you want when you log in.
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post #13 of 36
Thread Starter 
Sounds good. I think I will start with GNOME per Fuzzy's comment and perhaps try KDE at a later date.

It also appears as if Windows 7 will shrink the system partition so I can compact Windows 7 into it's own small partition (instead of the entire drive) and put Linux on the free space. Is this true?

Does it make more sense to install Windows 7 first, then shrink it to the smallest possible size? Or would it be more intelligent to allocate a certain amount of space, say 10GB, when first formatting the disk (I don't think you can shrink it to the exact size of Windows since it doesn't know how much space it will use yet)? If I do the former, what happens when I install patches or whatnot? Would that make the OS larger than the partition and then where would those install?
post #14 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by xyeLz View Post

Sounds good. I think I will start with GNOME per Fuzzy's comment and perhaps try KDE at a later date.
It also appears as if Windows 7 will shrink the system partition so I can compact Windows 7 into it's own small partition (instead of the entire drive) and put Linux on the free space. Is this true?
Does it make more sense to install Windows 7 first, then shrink it to the smallest possible size? Or would it be more intelligent to allocate a certain amount of space, say 10GB, when first formatting the disk (I don't think you can shrink it to the exact size of Windows since it doesn't know how much space it will use yet)? If I do the former, what happens when I install patches or whatnot? Would that make the OS larger than the partition and then where would those install?

I always install windows first and then let the linux installer do its own thing. Most of them let you install linux onto the windows partition, so you only ever have one partition on the hard drive. When I need a second partition I use easeus partition master to resize my windows partition.

also remember, linux can access the windows partitions, but windows cannot access the linux ones. So when in doubt give windows more.

I have my linux mint installed on a 20gb partition, because i can still access all my stuff from windows if needed, and store stuff there as well. Linux isn't very big so you don't need a lot of space.
post #15 of 36
Thread Starter 
Do you ever run into problems, say if Windows gets corrupted? Then you need to wipe clean your Linux distro along with it, correct?

The other thing is that Windows creates two partitions. One is the 100MB random whatever partition (I don't know how to get by this) and the other one is the actual system partition. Are you sure it would be okay to just add it to Windows?

If I did shrink Windows to as small as I possibly could, what would happen when I install patches?
post #16 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by xyeLz View Post

Do you ever run into problems, say if Windows gets corrupted? Then you need to wipe clean your Linux distro along with it, correct?
The other thing is that Windows creates two partitions. One is the 100MB random whatever partition (I don't know how to get by this) and the other one is the actual system partition. Are you sure it would be okay to just add it to Windows?
If I did shrink Windows to as small as I possibly could, what would happen when I install patches?

don't shrink windows down very much, just shrink it enough to fit linux. I would say give linux between 15gb and 20gb. Because you can access and store information on your windows partition from linux if you run out on that partition, but if you run out on windows, you can't access the linux side. So if you run out on windows, you are pretty much stuck.

If you have linux installed on the same partition as windows the way ubuntu does it, you would have to reinstall both OS's if windows became corrupted. As far as I know ubuntu is the only one that does this.

give yourself a 20gb partition for linux and you will be fine.
post #17 of 36
Thread Starter 
Thanks thrasher, +rep.

I would like to have two separate partitions, as opposed to Ubuntu's process.

When I say shrink Windows system, I just mean when you do it in the diskmgmt console it will automatically put in the figure to shrink to. I assume that this would be the currently used amount of space required by Windows - is this correct? I know it can't be the largest projected amount of space since they can't predict how large service packs or patches might be in the future.

I'm just wondering what happens if you shrink it to what Windows says and then you install patches or whatnot, because I'm sure it won't automatically expand to compensate. I mean, is it standard practice to give Windows a set amount of disk space (such as 30GB), or is it best practice to let Windows decide?
post #18 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by xyeLz View Post

Thanks thrasher, +rep.
I would like to have two separate partitions, as opposed to Ubuntu's process.
When I say shrink Windows system, I just mean when you do it in the diskmgmt console it will automatically put in the figure to shrink to. I assume that this would be the currently used amount of space required by Windows - is this correct? I know it can't be the largest projected amount of space since they can't predict how large service packs or patches might be in the future.
I'm just wondering what happens if you shrink it to what Windows says and then you install patches or whatnot, because I'm sure it won't automatically expand to compensate. I mean, is it standard practice to give Windows a set amount of disk space (such as 30GB), or is it best practice to let Windows decide?

the windows thing doesn't always work. I had a problem where no matter what I did, or how much I deleted, it would only give me 3.4gb of shrinkable space, so I had to use easeus partition master to do it, then I was able to get 20gb for my linux partition.
post #19 of 36
Thread Starter 
So I would assume that best practice would then be to give every partition a set amount of space?

Is there a best practice "amount" for Windows 7? I only have a single 64GB SSD so the smaller the better in this situation but if there's a "normal" number that is used by most for Windows then that is fine. I plan on using 20GB for Linux and so that would leave me with 14GB of usable space (which should be plenty for what I'm using this for).
post #20 of 36
Thread Starter 
Okay onto a new issue...

Just gonna be installing Red Hat here and I am looking for the Intel HD Graphics 3000 driver from Intel. I found this site: http://intellinuxgraphics.org/2012.02.html but I have no idea what I'm doing. Any help would be great!
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