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[KS] isostick - the optical drive in a usb stick - Page 4  

post #31 of 59
now i wont need to carry around 50 boot discs
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post #32 of 59
Thread Starter 
I'll admit, I'm a tad bit skeptical about the ODD protocol to make the BIOS think it's a ODD...

If it doesn't perform as advertised though, they will have to refund the money, bottom line...

The truth of the matter is, there is already a software that multi-boots ISOs from a USB Flash Drive...

Indeed there are multiple ones that do it...

I think this is probably a DOS Grub Menu that boots ISOs from the USB Drive probably...

But making the computer show it up as an actual drive, via Windows, well that's not fake, he clearly shows that in the video...

I don't think this is a scam, I think it's a legitimate device, however, I'd have to have one to test the boot-ability of the flash drive via ODD...

He clearly claims that it can boot like it was an ODD for systems that cannot change boot devices, which are the much older computers (10+ Years Old)...


It seems to me it would be just wiser to use an SSD that is like 64 GB, because some of them come with a USB Drive Connection, ideally you would just need the software to select the ISO to boot up, the problem is, not all of the ISOs are bootable from this type of software, unfortunately. frown.gif

Anyway, the speed difference would be quite large, as USB is faster than DVD, definitely...

If you actually hooked up the SSD, it would make booting the ISO super fast, indeed...

Better to me, would be to build SSDs for booting ISOs... The cost of the USB Drives are a bit high, considering SSDs are around $80 - $120... for 32 - 64 GB
Edited by _GTech - 3/29/12 at 9:59pm
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post #33 of 59
This would have been amazing if it was introduced like seven years ago. Nowadays not so much, but still pretty handy.
    
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post #34 of 59
sweet as, but damn its expensive

i'd give it $50 for a stick without storage and give me a SD/microSD card reader or a USB host built in , alot easier to fill it with stacks of ISO
post #35 of 59
People, please read, don't be throwing out your money for nothing.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ghostrider85 View Post

If your old machine can't boot from a usb device, how will this magically enables it? Doesn't makes sense to me.
As fas as i can understand, this device emulates an ODD drive, your pc will gonna see it as an ODD CONNECTED VIA USB,
so how will this work if your computer doesn't support booting via usb device?
if your computer supports booting from an ODD that connected via USB, it will also support booting from a flash drive connected via USB, so what is this device for again?
post #36 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by LTC View Post

$125 for 8GB is a little steep frown.gif

Stupid people will pay.


Just like the people who buy apple stuff.
They will pay 3x to 4x (upto 10x )the price for the same hardware.





I sold a MAC ed ATI 9800 pro for $100

and the PC ones were going for 10$ or so
Edited by punker - 3/29/12 at 9:52pm
    
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post #37 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by dejanh View Post

This will only work if the machine actually supports external CD/DVD drives over USB. The product is misleading completely. It will not make a computer that cannot read or boot off of a USB-connected device somehow magically be able to boot off of a USB connected device. Whoever paid the asking price for this is an idiot.

Negative.

Virtually every USB bios since around 1998ish supports a feature where when it finds certain USB devices, it will emulate them as if they are legacy versions of that component to the higher functions of the computer. You'll probably see this feature under "enable legacy usb support" or something similar.

This feature was added to enable e.g. usb keyboards and mice to work before the OS has booted up, as if you may recall, some USB enabled computers in the 90's annoyingly wouldn't allow you to change bios settings with a USB keyboard. This feature also allows USB floppy disks and dvd drives to work. Chances are that if your BIOS was made after 1996 or so, it already contains the necessary code to boot from a DVD drive. However unless it was made after 2004 or so (these years all vary from manufacturer, some a year earlier, some a year later) it doesn't have the code necessary to boot from a USB mass storage device.

That said, if you have a USB DVD device, it'll boot with pretty much any relevant computer you want to use it with. If it doesn't, chances are that computer is so old that either it doesn't have a USB slot to begin with, or it is only capable of booting from either a floppy or a hard disk, or *maybe* a PXE ROM.

This would fill a good niche for me, because I often find myself fixing somebody's computer, but I don't have a windows DVD handy.

In a case I'm working on right now, the laptop doesn't even have a DVD drive. I have a sata blu-ray drive with an 5.25" enclosure, and these older machines can boot from that fine. Old 2001 era machine booting from a SATA blu-ray drive over USB? IMPOSSIBRU! Nope, it works fine. However right now I find myself without a windows DVD. Annoyed, I went around looking for something to get around this problem. First I found the Zalman VE-200, which is no longer made, or the Zalman VE-300, which reportedly has severe problems with a faulty USB connector.

I figured "hmm...I really don't want to buy a 2.5 inch HDD, and I'd like to have something smaller anyways" so after more searching I found out about this. It's sold out right now, but in looking up where to buy it I landed on your post. So I just felt I had to offer my two cents.

Anyways, for now it looks like I'll have to make a new DVD that will turn into a coaster when I'm finished. If I had something like this, I'd never burn another CD or DVD.
Edited by Herpdeederp - 12/14/12 at 8:26pm
post #38 of 59
Currently limited to FAT32, really now? ISO file size limit is 4GB, an OS can easily surpass that. Not a critical thing, but come on now.

Now I know, you guys are gonna hate on me for it and show how Windows 7 is only like ~3GB, but if you start throwing in service packs and patches to meet your needs, it's easily above the FAT32 limit.
post #39 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by brfield View Post

Currently limited to FAT32, really now? ISO file size limit is 4GB, an OS can easily surpass that. Not a critical thing, but come on now.
Now I know, you guys are gonna hate on me for it and show how Windows 7 is only like ~3GB, but if you start throwing in service packs and patches to meet your needs, it's easily above the FAT32 limit.

Filesystems on portable devices are an annoying thing, mostly just because of Microsoft. Everything is mainly stuck on fat32 because it is the only thing that windows supports while at the same time you don't have to pay them royalties for doing so.

If you want to support NTFS or exFAT, you have to play the licensing game with microsoft. exFAT is the most ideal FS for portable devices because service wise, it is about as basic as you can get. The reason this is ideal for portable devices is because most of them don't have any wear leveling features in order to remain cost effective, or they are speed limited, or both. When you don't have wear leveling, you have a better chance at burning out the area of the flash that contains the MFT because every time you do *anything* to a file, multiple changes are made here. That includes a program so much as pointing to a file without even opening it.

Regardless of what you use though, Microsofts patent terms are that if you sell any devices which use exFAT or NTFS, or even if your portable device comes pre-formatted with exFAT or NTFS you have to pay them licensing fees.

They could support EXT2, which is every bit as simple as exFAT when it comes to limited writes, but then 95% or so of those want to use it conveniently can't do so on a windows box without installing special software (this applies even if you don't use windows, because chances are you'll at least occasionally want to plug a portable device into a windows machine, which by default only does FAT12, FAT16, FAT32, exFAT, ISO9660, UDF, or NTFS.)

One of the key points of UMS is that when you plug it in, your files are there. No messing around with anything, and it kind of kills it when your host OS doesn't do that.
post #40 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by brfield View Post

Currently limited to FAT32, really now? ISO file size limit is 4GB, an OS can easily surpass that. Not a critical thing, but come on now.
Now I know, you guys are gonna hate on me for it and show how Windows 7 is only like ~3GB, but if you start throwing in service packs and patches to meet your needs, it's easily above the FAT32 limit.

Solution, dual ISO's 4GB each, essentially being the same thing as a DVD-DL single-sided ( 8GB roughly which this device is, and I'm pretty sure they didn't overlook the filesystem limitations in such a manor while giving you more than a single FAT32 filesystem could handle ), or 2 DVD's ( which is pretty rare these days ), which will accommodate essentially any operating system as most come on either a plain CD/DVD or a DVD-DL.
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