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Overlocking hypothetical questions, like why does overclock "fail" faster sometimes?

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 
I just have some hypothetical and philosophical nature overclocking questions that I always wondered about.

For example, Why, when I'm testing my computer sometimes, it can run 1 or 2hours of prime 95 on say 4.4ghz with 1.240vcore, ...
...but then I can run 4.4ghz with 1.235 and it will fail....

OK I get it, but then I will re-raise the vcore to 1.240v for the 4.4ghz and run prime 95 again LONGER to test stability but it will fail within the first 5 min?

How?

Also, if you overclock to a certain frequency (i.e. 4.5ghz) and vcore (i.e. 1.280) and find stability in Windows 7 via prime 95 after so many hours...

Hypothetically, if you reformatted the hard drive with a clean install, you can just "pick" the BIOS overclock settings back to what they were correct? since the hardware will be the same.
post #2 of 4
Your just riding the fence between stable and unstable. A 0.005 Volt change isn't enough to get "consistently" stable performance for your specific scenario. More specifically, these weird quarks you are seeing likely have to do with the capacitors on the voltage regulators or internally. Try bumping the voltage up to 1.25 Your see more consistent results.

Yes, you can pick the BIOS settings back to what they were no problem, i've done it before.
Edited by crimsontears809739 - 3/30/12 at 9:23am
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post #3 of 4
Thread Starter 
Well yeah, I'm riding the "fence" between stable and unstable - lol, shouldn't it be that way?

Why would you want to randomly pick a vcore that will make you stable, but run more voltage THAN needed through the CPU thus decreasing it's lifespan?

My style is anal and meticulous, but I want to run the least Vcore to make it stable for my given overclock frequency, such as 4.4ghz for 24/7 usage.

Though, I noticed I end up failing so much and blue screening my windows OS seems to become corrupted by the time I get a stable setting :/
post #4 of 4
Hmm... perhaps i could answer your question better.

Even though you increased the voltage by 0.005 the power supply isn't perfect, and the voltage is going to bounce up and down a tiny bit. Lets says you added 0.005, but the voltage bounces up and down by +/- 0.0005.

I guess to know the perfect voltage you need the minimum stable voltage + extra voltage to account for your power supplies natural imperfections.

Also, getting off topic, you could run the process at 1.4V for like 6 years before lifespan became a problem. At 1.24 volts, that really isn't a issue for you.

Linear Technology is probably one of the biggest manufacturers of voltage regulators ( aka the thing that actually increases/decreases the voltage). They have good application notes and technical documentation explaining how these things work and why they have imperfections. It's extremely technical. But if your curious, Linear's website would be a good place to do some reading.

http://www.linear.com/designtools/app_notes.php#power Be warned, it's really technical.
Edited by crimsontears809739 - 4/2/12 at 9:21am
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