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Thirsty Work -My Little Devil PC-V8 [Build Log] - Page 2

post #11 of 93
Thread Starter 
Thanks everyone for the comments! I certainly will try not to disappoint biggrin.gif
post #12 of 93
Thread Starter 
[Waterblocks Are Here!]

398
[ I really like the design and color choices for EK's boxes and packaging material]

I've spent the last few days getting my Windows install configured a little bit better. I'm still waiting on the case to arrive before starting any major work or modding, but I've been told by the good folks at LD Cooling that my case will likely be finished and ship next week. That certainly would be nice - I can't wait to see it!

This weekend my set of matching water blocks arrived. CPU blocks are frequently reviewed online, but motherboard and graphics card blocks don't get reviews as much - I'm assuming because there are so many more types of motherboards and fewer people liquid cool their graphics card - also, graphics cards these days can handle a lot more heat than CPUs, so I suppose the waterblock performance isn't as critical.

Based on the recent series of reviews at Martin's, I went with the EK Supreme HF for my CPU block. It received the highest marks for thermal performance, and also got excellent marks for not being too restrictive on the water flow rate. Another factor in EK's favor is that they also make motherboard and GPU blocks, so could ensure all of the water blocks I end up using match aesthetically.

Now that they are all here, I'm more than happy with their appearance and the apparent quality of the machining - and I think the black acetal on the blocks will go along with the primarily-black color scheme I'm going for on the motherboard.

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[The GTX 680 Waterblock - Top]

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[The GTX 680 Waterblock - Bottom]

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[The Rampage IV Extreme Waterblock - Top]

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[The Rampage IV Extreme Waterblock - Bottom]

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[Group Photo! The CPU Waterblock is on the left]
post #13 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kallor View Post

[Adventures in Radiator Flushing]
I was surprised to learn that when you receive your shiny new radiators, they don't come ready to use straight from the factory. Thus, one must flush out the various debris inside new radiators, left over from the manufacturing process, before using them for water cooling (unless you want those debris to clog up your water cooling loop, effectively being filtered out by your cooling blocks as water circulates in your cooling loop). I guess this process is skipped at the factory to keep costs down - and the shipping process might knock extra debris loose, so maybe this is a smart move by the radiator manufactures.
The most recommended method of radiator flushing calls for using a heated mixture of water and vinegar (between 10% to 50% vinegar, depending on who you ask). So with that advice in hand, I did a little shopping and got ready to flush the two 4x120mm radiators I currently have.
*snip
One of said 4x120mm radiators
*snip*
Radiator flushing supplies!
I heated up the water/vinegar mixture, filled up the radiator most of the way a let it sit for about 10 minutes, giving the radiator a vigorous shake here and there. The first flush turned the flushing water a lovely blue color (which surprised me, but is not unusual). I emptied the water from the radiator into a glass pan sitting on a white towel so that any sediment in the rinse water would be visible.
*snip*
Despite its blue color, this radiator run-off tasted nothing like Gatorade or Kool-Aid, and was decidedly unrefreshing
I repeated this process over 10 times. The amount of sand-like particulate that rinsed out of the radiator gradually decreased and the blue color went away, but particulate was unfortunately still somewhat prevalent even after about a dozen flushes.
*snip*
The radiator still had sediment, even after about a dozen flushes
I wasn't looking forward to 10-30 more flushes, and then repeating that for additional radiators. A bit of searching showed that people frequently attach a hose/tube to their sink and connect that to the radiator, and flush hot tap water through the radiator for a few minutes as an easier and faster method of flushing the radiator. This process is then concluded by several rinses of distilled water to ensure no contamination is left behind by the tap water. My sink is one of those that has a nossle on a retractable hose, and it turned out after removing the nossle, the hose made a great seal on the radiators fill ports. So I flushed hot water from the tap through the radiator, and a few short minutes later, the flush water being emptied out of the radiator was nice and clear. Yay!
*snip*
Finally the radiator is clean!
I then did several more flushes with distilled water to double check for sediment and to ensure that anything left behind by the tap water was also cleaned out. Now my first two radiators a sparkly clean both inside and out.


Nice build bud. I've had one rad do that on me, my Phobya 200. I got tired and started flushing with the pump. Taking care with the intake not to gobble up any of the flux. I've since always flushed this way after a first thorough flush like you did.

Check for sediments while you flush, when they stop coming out after a shake or two, you're done.

I did it this way
450

PS, don't forget to prime the pump since it's above water.
Edited by Rognin - 4/8/12 at 3:50pm
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post #14 of 93
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Nice build bud. I've had one rad do that on me, my Phobya 200. I got tired and started flushing with the pump. Taking care with the intake not to gobble up any of the flux. I've since always flushed this way after a first thorough flush like you did.

Check for sediments while you flush, when they stop coming out after a shake or two, you're done.

I did it this way...

Solid work! And thanks for the compliments! Your approach looks quite efficient - before I started the radiator flushing process, I'd read a thread or two of people noting it could take a bit of time, but it didn't really hit home for me until I was over an hour into the process and still without an end in site ... on the first of three radiators. 'Automating' the flushing process, regardless of how you go about doing it, how gets my highest recommendation :-) ... unless you only have one radiator - perhaps in that case the manual process could be ok.
post #15 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rognin View Post

Nice build bud. I've had one rad do that on me, my Phobya 200. I got tired and started flushing with the pump. Taking care with the intake not to gobble up any of the flux. I've since always flushed this way after a first thorough flush like you did.
Check for sediments while you flush, when they stop coming out after a shake or two, you're done.
I did it this way

PS, don't forget to prime the pump since it's above water.

With the water below the pump, will it still suck in water from below as long as you prime it?
post #16 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by dhongyt View Post

With the water below the pump, will it still suck in water from below as long as you prime it?

Yeah, you don't have much restriction (ie a whole computer loop). Prime it by sucking air through the outlet tube, it's like siphoning gas... rolleyes.gif
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GraphicsRAMRAMRAM
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 580 Corsair  Corsair  Corsair  
RAMHard DriveCoolingPower
Corsair  2x Mushkin 240Gb SSD Raid 0  A lot. ST1500 
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FT02 Xonar ST 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K P8P67 WS Revolution Sparkle Calibre GTX 560 G.Skill 
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NVIDIA GeForce GTX 580 Corsair  Corsair  Corsair  
RAMHard DriveCoolingPower
Corsair  2x Mushkin 240Gb SSD Raid 0  A lot. ST1500 
CaseAudio
FT02 Xonar ST 
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i5-2500K P8P67 WS Revolution Sparkle Calibre GTX 560 G.Skill 
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post #17 of 93
Thread Starter 
[Adventures in Waiting]

I don't have a lot to report this week. I am still waiting on my case from LDCooling . . . hopefully this upcoming week will finally be the one when I get the shipping notice. In the meantime, I decided to do a comparison of tubing. I narrowed my choices down to Primochill PrimoFlex LRT UV Red and Danger Den Dreamflex UV Black. The UV Red tube stays red under UV light, and the black tubing turns a blue color. I did a comparison under the Oznium.com UV lights I am going to use . . .

398
[Comparing Danger Den Black and Primochill Red]

The Danger Den black doesn't look this colorful in person, whereas the Primochill Red looks even better. So at this point I am heavily leaning toward the Primochill Red tubing, but I will wait until I can do a side by side comparison with my painted case before I make my final decision.

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[Comparing Tube Cutters]

Here you can see the tube cutter the Danger Den tubing is bundled with. It works, but I couldn't help but feel like it might break and slice off my finger when I used it. On the other hand, this Lenox cutter I picked up at Amazon is an absolute joy to use - it snips so cleanly and smoothly you could nearly make a pleasant evening out of just slicing through tubing ;-)

Cross your fingers for me - hopefully my next post will be to finally report my case has shipped!
Edited by Kallor - 4/14/12 at 7:50pm
post #18 of 93
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post #19 of 93
Thread Starter 
[Fan Sleeving Time!]

I sadly don't have any good news about my case, but I figured in the meantime there are still some things I can work on to keep the build rolling while I wait on the last critical piece to arrive.

So this weekend I set aside some time to start working with the MDPC sleeving I ordered.

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[Sleeving Tools!]

I'm going to wait until I have the case before sleeving the power supply cables - I want to make sure everything is just the right length, and I won't be able to tell that until the case is here. However, the fan cables are all going to end up using extensions and merging cables (so I can hook up 2-3 fans to one fan connector) so sleeving an initial part of the fan cable seems like a safe thing to do at this point.

The process was a bit troublesome at first, but even the first fan turned out pretty well I think.

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[1 down, 16 to go! This was my first fan - after about the 5th or 6th fan I was doing a cleaner job in much less time]

There are a few adjustments I had to make to the fan chassis . . . this picture shows where the cables are normally routed, but with the sleeving, everything is a bit too thick to fit in here. However, a quick snip with the … snips … puts everything in the right once again.

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[Trimming the fan body]

The top groove, on the right/center of the photo in the fan chassis shows the width post-trimming; the bottom groove directly under it, shown here on the left side of the photo, shows the original width.

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[Post Trim]

This how-to by Lutro0 outlines the process perfectly. At first I wasn't too keen on using superglue, but ended up being quite helpful to keep everything in place. You can't be too aggressive with the heat shrink on the fan-side on the sleeving, as you will singe the dust-cover/sticker that the heatshink rests right beside - if you are, the sticker starts to get all melty and gross :-( Thus, I used superglue as recommended by Lutro0 to get the sleeving in the right position while still keeping it tight.

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[The superglue box worked as a great shield incase of accidental glue drips]

Here is what the Gentle Typhoons look like after having the ugly white fan connector replace with a black connector, as well as having the red, yellow and black cables sleeved.

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[A Sleeved GT]

I ended up sleeving an even dozen Gentle Typoons, as well as 5 Nosieblocker fans. The first few fans felt tricky, but it became fun and satisfying work after I got more comfortable with the process. It is tedious, but I certainly recommend it based on the results and feeling of satisfaction it gives.


To conclude, BONUS CAT PHOTO!!!!

398
[She was interested in the sleeving work at first, but soon got sleepy]
Edited by Kallor - 4/22/12 at 5:50pm
post #20 of 93
Thread Starter 
[RAM Testing Time!]

While I am waiting for my case, I figured I would go ahead and get Windows installed and all my processing hardware checked out. At the moment, that means making sure all of my RAM is good to go. I've never tried something this intensive before when building a PC, but times have changed and I will ask more of this machine than the PCs I built in the olden' days...so Memtest here I come! I didn't know how long running the memory test would take . . . I naively assumed an hour or two, tops. With 64GB to test, that turned out to be a little bit off. Frequently people run Memtest for a day or more. Things looked smooth at first, but when I woke up to check on things after a night of memory testing ... worriedsmiley.gif

398
[OH NOES! I don't know what the error codes mean, other than that they indicates faulty RAM]

After a mere 19 hours of testing, things fell apart. One error might not be something to get too worked up over, but the Memtest developers say that RAM should be able to run for days without an error, and that an error in this time frame = bad RAM. So an error means return time (I repeated the test of course - which failed again - before requesting a return/replacement). Thankfully, I got this RAM from good ole' Amazon - they always come through, and they've overnighted me replacement RAM after a few quick clicks.

I've got two 32GB kits of RAM, and this test that errored out was a test utilizing both RAM kits. The next step was to see if only 1 of the 4x8GB kits was bad, or both were. I took 1 kit of 4 sticks out of the motherboard ... and more sadness as two more tests failed..competitivesmiley.png

398
[More fail - but faster at least as I am only testing 32GB]

Currently I am testing the other 32GB kit, and after about 12 hours things are looking good - I am error free on these guys so far! Either way, I'm thankful that a tool as easy to use as Memtest is available to validate my RAM. You just download, run the EXE, and it zaps a thumb drive (or CD-R) turning into a boot disk for Memtest. It auto-runs when you start up - it couldn't be much easier.

[Update]
After letting Memtest run almost 5 total passes over a 20 hour period, everything remains looking good for this second tested set of RAM. I think I've isolated the bad kit of the two. Sounds like progress to me!

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Edited by Kallor - 4/23/12 at 5:26am
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