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Yamakasi Catleap overclocking? - Page 2

post #11 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost4468 View Post

That's wrong I believe, I was reading the thread an apparently the refresh rate was what was limiting the response time, the people who had overclocked had lower response times...
I believe you're slightly confusing things there. The ability of the pixel to change all the way from white to black is the limiting factor of how fast the screen can display different images. Sure, quite often you will not have to go all the way from white to black and back, and in that sense companies are getting away with a grey-to-grey rating.

Here are some very rough calculations to illustrate the point. Think of it this way:
- 120Hz ideally means that you'll be able to display 120 frames per second.
- 1 second has 1000ms.
- For 60Hz, that would mean you have to be able to completely switch a pixel in 16ms.
- For 120Hz, you need pixels that can switch in 8ms or less.

Now, LG's own optimistic rating for the display is 6ms grey-to-grey. That would mean that in practice it should be quite fine for refresh rates of 75Hz to 85Hz. As you try to go higher than that you'll be getting more and more image artifacts. How noticeably those will be, of course, would vary from individual to individual and the manner of content you're viewing.

Now, if there were manufacturers who were really caring about PC gaming, we would've been seeing gaming centric, high resolution, quality, non-TN displays running 75Hz to 100Hz for at least a couple of years now. The tech is there, companies just don't believe the profit is. Much easier to churn out 1080p60Hz and call it a day. Frankly, I really want to see how the Catleap 100Hz affair will go and then probably try and start a big enough petition that we can shove in companies faces with demands for real gaming screens without dead-weight gimmicks.
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post #12 of 33
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bors Mistral View Post

I believe you're slightly confusing things there. The ability of the pixel to change all the way from white to black is the limiting factor of how fast the screen can display different images. Sure, quite often you will not have to go all the way from white to black and back, and in that sense companies are getting away with a grey-to-grey rating.
Here are some very rough calculations to illustrate the point. Think of it this way:
- 120Hz ideally means that you'll be able to display 120 frames per second.
- 1 second has 1000ms.
- For 60Hz, that would mean you have to be able to completely switch a pixel in 16ms.
- For 120Hz, you need pixels that can switch in 8ms or less.
Now, LG's own optimistic rating for the display is 6ms grey-to-grey. That would mean that in practice it should be quite fine for refresh rates of 75Hz to 85Hz. As you try to go higher than that you'll be getting more and more image artifacts. How noticeably those will be, of course, would vary from individual to individual and the manner of content you're viewing.
Now, if there were manufacturers who were really caring about PC gaming, we would've been seeing gaming centric, high resolution, quality, non-TN displays running 75Hz to 100Hz for at least a couple of years now. The tech is there, companies just don't believe the profit is. Much easier to churn out 1080p60Hz and call it a day. Frankly, I really want to see how the Catleap 100Hz affair will go and then probably try and start a big enough petition that we can shove in companies faces with demands for real gaming screens without dead-weight gimmicks.

Ahh right, sorry about that, will overclocking these monitors have any serious impact on the life of the monitor?
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post #13 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost4468 View Post

I'm talking about the 2B versions.

very good of you to be clear in your first post and asking about that specific model. oops you weren't.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost4468 View Post

Ahh right, sorry about that, will overclocking these monitors have any serious impact on the life of the monitor?

nobody knows b/c nobody has had their for more than a month or two.
post #14 of 33
How come nobody actually bothered to answer the question other than kevinsbane?

Lowering the resolution would allow higher refresh rates to fit within the same amount of bandwidth, but the 2B version can't handle lower resolutions. There is a quirk where if you keep the horizontal resolution at 2560, it will display a usable picture, but the next frame will be at the bottom of the screen. Using this quirk, I was able to get up to 123 Hz at a lower resolution. It keeps up just fine, and there's actually less trailing at higher refresh rates. The monitor won't display anything beyond 123 Hz at any resolution.

I haven't seen anyone try it with the 2C version. Supposedly the 2C version will accept 720p, so it's worth trying it there.
post #15 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost4468 View Post

What GPU do you have? I've only heard of the gtx 680 getting it to 120hz.

That's precisely the GPU that I have.

ToastyX, I don't know if it's my graphics card that scales it, but my Catleap does display non-native content at acceptable image quality. For example, I can see all the bios and startup options, and I've run at least one game at 1680x1050 resolution without noticing anything different about it. Again, I'm not sure if that has anything to do with my grpahics card doing the proper scaling before outputting the signal to the monitor though.
post #16 of 33
Unless you add a custom resolution or modify the EDID, it's the video card scaling. The monitor's EDID only lists 2560x1440 @ 60 Hz. The video driver will scale any resolution that's not listed in the EDID.
post #17 of 33
ToastyX, you're the EDID expert around here, right? If I'm not mistaken you can use an EDID file you've created to overwrite the factory one in software, no?
Would you be interested in writing a guide showing how to add extra resolutions and refresh rates?
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post #18 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bors Mistral View Post

ToastyX, you're the EDID expert around here, right? If I'm not mistaken you can use an EDID file you've created to overwrite the factory one in software, no?
Would you be interested in writing a guide showing how to add extra resolutions and refresh rates?


Some basics to get started;

 

 

1,109k .zip file

 

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post #19 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost4468 View Post

I was wondering if you ran these monitors at a lower res like 1080/768 would you be able to overclock them past 120hz? Has anyone, or is anyone willing to give it a go?

Courtesy of Hypermatrix on the Yamakasi Catleap Monitor Club thread.
post #20 of 33

I have been asking a lot of questions in this thread Yamakasi Catleap Q270 (100hz guaranteed).

 

From all the responses will still need confirmations to:

 

1. If the monitor is receiving DVI-DL signal from GPU DVI transmitter which is limited to 9.9 Gbit @330 MHz (with overhead 8b/10b) then the monitor refreshes it to 120Hz.

 

2. We simply tell the OS that the monitor is capable of 2560x1440 @120Hz by modifying the EDID or we overclock the GPU DVI transmitter to 2560x1440 @120Hz = 15.75 Gbit @ 442.37 MHz (with overhead).

 

Standard DVI-DL transmitter 9.9 Gbit @330 MHz http://store.nvidia.com/DRHM/store?Action=DisplayProductDetailsPage&SiteID=nvidia&Locale=en_US&Env=BASE&productID=227587600&resid=T5AIGgoHAtQAAAoFBWwAAAAI&rests=1334839321047

 

I don't think it's possible to overclock GPU DVI-DL transmitter (TMDS and clock generator) beyond 330MHz as much as we can not overclock the monitor processor (PCB) designed for 60Hz to 120Hz @2560x1440.

 

 

 

  post #1098.

Quote:
Originally Posted by HyperMatrix View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken1649 View Post


Thanks HyperMatrix.

Do you happen to know if the monitor is receiving 133Hz or just the limit of the graphics card? And does it play well with the games at that refresh rate? And if you don't mind to upload the monitor .inf of this 133Hz?

Thanks

The highest I actually use to "Play" is around 124hz because it's fully perfect without any issues even after extended periods. Why 124 and not just 120hz? Well..as we go up higher, it has trouble actually putting out the refresh rate it's supposed to. For example, a 120hz display will put out 119-121hz. But this monitor, set to 120hz, will put out 115-119hz. So by going up to 123-124hz, I end up with an active 119hz-121hz.

And yes, the refresh rate will act and behave properly, IF you follow the OC guide in my signature below. Otherwise half of your games will revert back to 60hz when you play them. The limitation, even at 537mhz pixel clock didn't come from the card. At that refresh rate, your horizontal refresh rate is at 199khz. It's the 200khz which is the limit (I'm assuming from the PCB...because even at 200khz...that's ridiculously high. lol). But realistically...running a 60hz panel at nearly 222% of its stated specifications is scary. It follows the standard rule of Overclocking. Find your maximum OC, then bring it down a bit for long-term stability.

As for the inf, I already mentioned going through my youtube guide linked in my sig! There is a downloadable package in the video description that contains all tools and drivers, along with video guidance on how to use them. So don't worry about anything. Just get your hands on a B series monitor and you'll be set. wink.gif

 

 

Sorry if my questions were vague and I have been thinking how to make it easier to understand.

 

1. We all know that HD movies are mostly 24 FPS. Say, we watch it on 1920x1080 @120Hz monitor, it will refresh it to 120Hz = 120 FPS right? We also know that rendering movie can be done by GPU (hardware acceleration) or by software, is this correct? We don't have to do anything because the monitor EDID supports 1920x1080 @120 Hz. The display processor is also capable of 120Hz at that resolution. We can also choose the video quality is thru the display processor instead of graphics driver (GPU). From all the options we are still well within the DVI-DL bandwidth limit but it has nothing to do with GPU if we select software to render these movies, am I wrong?

 

2. The supported EDID of this Korean panel is 2560x1440 @60Hz right? So in order for the OS (Win 7) to recognize the panel capable of 2560x1440 @120Hz, we modified the EDID. Now, back to this HD 24 FPS movie, if we let the software to render then send the signal to monitor thru DVI-DL, the monitor will still refresh it to 24 x 5 = 120 FPS = 120 Hz. So is this all we are doing by telling the OS that the plugged in monitor is capable of 2560x1440 @120 Hz?

 

Let's leave gaming alone, because it's so confusing if we mix it with this DVI-DL bandwidth limitations, because while playing games @200 FPS on a 60 Hz capable monitor we are still seeing 200 FPS on the counter.

 

If what I am thinking is flaw, please kindly explain.


Edited by Ken1649 - 4/19/12 at 7:09am
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