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Best way to DIRECTLY send files over encrypted connection? - Page 6

post #51 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ulquiorra View Post

The server has the private key, the client has the publuic key, as for why its meant to be more secure,

actually it's the other way round. Your client has the private key and your server has the public key.

The private key is your private certificate to gain entry. The public key is what you redistribute to any and all servers you want access too.
post #52 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by FEAST View Post

Okay so I need to use a third party program to generate a keyfile.
This makes more sense.
What is the point in generating a private keyfile if you are only going to use the public one on the server? Or am I misinterpreting and the server needs the private keyfile to work....?

you need both.

Basically the process works like this:
  1. you connect to a server
  2. server sees that your requested user name has a valid public key saved on the server
  3. server requests a checksum of the private key to prove that you hold the unique private key for that user account
  4. if the keys match, you gain access. if not, you get declined.

[edit]
sorry for the double post
post #53 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plan9 View Post

actually it's the other way round. Your client has the private key and your server has the public key.
The private key is your private certificate to gain entry. The public key is what you redistribute to any and all servers you want access too.

wait ignore me im tired plan is right %_%
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post #54 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plan9 View Post

If you can, create a 4096bit RSA private key (IIRC 2048bit is theoretically crackable).

Nah. 2048 bit keys are nowhere near breakable by any publicly known means (NSA I can't vouch for). 1024 bit keys have yet to be factored, though it's getting close, so 1024 bit keys should be ditched (NIST recommended everyone move away from 1024 bit by 2010). 2048 bit keys, according to NIST, should be safe until 2030. This assumes that quantum computers do not become practical and that no math genius suddenly finds an efficient algorithm to factor large composites into primes in polynomial time. Since factoring large numbers has been a problem in number theory for thousands of years, it is safe to assume 2048 bit keys should be safe for many years to come (a decade at least).

But back on topic. It is amazing how difficult Windows makes this whole process for the OP. This could be setup in 10 minutes on a Linux box without having to install any extra software.
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post #55 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by thiussat View Post

Nah. 2048 bit keys are nowhere near breakable by any publicly known means (NSA I can't vouch for). 1024 bit keys have yet to be factored, though it's getting close, so 1024 bit keys should be ditched (NIST recommended everyone move away from 1024 bit by 2010). 2048 bit keys, according to NIST, should be safe until 2030. This assumes that quantum computers do not become practical and that no math genius suddenly finds an efficient algorithm to factor large composites into primes in polynomial time. Since factoring large numbers has been a problem in number theory for thousands of years, it is safe to assume 2048 bit keys should be safe for many years to come (a decade at least).
But back on topic. It is amazing how difficult Windows makes this whole process for the OP. This could be setup in 10 minutes on a Linux box without having to install any extra software.

I see, thank you.

Agreed about Windows, though Putty's keygen tools are pretty sound. Not sure if they keys are compatible with the SSH server being used here though.
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