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[PHYS.org] Carbon Nanotubes: The Weird World of Remote Joule Heating - Page 2

post #11 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpankyMcFlych View Post

Have carbon nanotubes actually ever been used for something yet? Cause we've been seeing articles like this for years now talking about the potential of nanotubes, but we never actually see any articles talking about an actual product that uses nanotubes. Frankly I'm starting to feel a little cynical about this supposed wonder material that doesn't actually ever get used for anything.

...cost, cost, cost. $30-50/gram today.

There were a few thousand dollars per gram a decade ago but new production techniques are being developed.
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post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckieHo View Post

...cost, cost, cost. $30-50/gram today.
There were a few thousand dollars per gram a decade ago but new production techniques are being developed.

Then how much does a chip weigh? Because that price sounds like I could get myself a nanootube CPU ofr barely 2-3 times the price of a silicon one ...
post #13 of 21
Carbon nanotubes, graphene, synthetic diamond, quantum computing........... I'll never live long enough to see it come to reality.
post #14 of 21
Am I correct in thinking that, what we are seeing today with Carbon NTs is similar to the early days microprocessors?


That, this next human age of technology is going to heavily involve CNTs, as we've seen the microprocessor be integrated into everything from cars to refrigerators.


That is the way I think things are going anyway.


Edit: I mean in the scale of the next; " Now - 25 years".
post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by linkdiablo View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckieHo View Post

...cost, cost, cost. $30-50/gram today.
There were a few thousand dollars per gram a decade ago but new production techniques are being developed.

Then how much does a chip weigh? Because that price sounds like I could get myself a nanootube CPU ofr barely 2-3 times the price of a silicon one ...

The reason CPU's are expensive at all is because of the billions it costs to develop them.

A actual CPU is only around $20 of actual material and manufacturing cost.

Nano tubes are a far off tech, your probably going to see quantum processors first.
post #16 of 21
It sounds like they've found a way to turn magnetic fields into heat.

I wonder if understanding the physics behind this observation might lead to the ability to harvest energy from the Earth's magnetic field and convert it into usable electrical current?
post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by willis888 View Post

It sounds like they've found a way to turn magnetic fields into heat.
I wonder if understanding the physics behind this observation might lead to the ability to harvest energy from the Earth's magnetic field and convert it into usable electrical current?

From my reading of the article they've found a way to transfer heat through carbon nano-tubes, where did you read about magnetic fields?
post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by noak View Post

Nano tubes are a far off tech, your probably going to see quantum processors first.

Well, who knows? We've been seeing breakthroughs in both technologies recently. Personally, I'd love to see both advances realized. Just imagine CNT's cooling your 2048 core quantum processor drool.gif
post #19 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by gelatin_factory View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by willis888 View Post

It sounds like they've found a way to turn magnetic fields into heat.
I wonder if understanding the physics behind this observation might lead to the ability to harvest energy from the Earth's magnetic field and convert it into usable electrical current?

From my reading of the article they've found a way to transfer heat through carbon nano-tubes, where did you read about magnetic fields?

This line here:
Quote:
"We believe that the nanotube's electrons are creating electrical fields due to the current, and the substrate's atoms are directly responding to those fields," Cumings explains. "The transfer of energy is taking place through these intermediaries, and not because the nanotube's electrons are bouncing off of the substrate's atoms.

It sounds like an electromagnet that heats nearby objects.

Maybe the electrons moving through the nanotube create a wave of magnetism that acts like a tiny magnetohydrodynamic drive, accelerating electrons into the substrate at high enough energies to cause the substrate to become hot? We know the area around the substrate has free electrons in it because they are intentionally being pumped into the area by the measuring device (electron thermal microscopy), but the article seems to say that all the action is taking place within the substrate itself, so maybe it is the electrons and ions within the substrate that are being accelerated?

The Earth's field might not have the right properties to get a similar effect, but I do like to speculate about things I barely understand.
Edited by willis888 - 4/14/12 at 2:44am
post #20 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by willis888 View Post

This line here:
It sounds like an electromagnet that heats nearby objects.

Fair enough. Well played, Sir. Just did a little googling and you appear to be correct.

Also thanks for not speaking down to me, and I'll give props to myself for admitting when I'm wrong. 1-1 and the winner is... OCN! thumb.gifbiggrin.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by willis888 View Post

Maybe the electrons moving through the nanotube create a wave of magnetism that acts similarly to a riptide in the ocean, or a tiny magnetohydrodynamic drive, dragging in electrons from outside the substrate at high enough energies to cause the substrate to become hot? We know the area around the substrate has free electrons in it, because they are intentionally being pumped into the area by the measuring device (electron thermal microscopy).

Damn, you're smart! Look, I said you're right already! Quit editing your post and leave me alone! I'm sorry, I apologize, please stop dropping knowledge on me wink.gif
Edited by gelatin_factory - 4/14/12 at 2:35am
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