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post #11 of 29
Thread Starter 
I was talking to one of my good gaming buddies tonight and was informed that instead of partitioning my external, I can simply use vmware player and setup the different operating systems and save everything to the external, this way I can simply open the virtual disk files whenever I feel in the mood to explore, right from the virtual player. I thought this was a pretty good alternative and avoided a lot of partitioning heartache, even though it isn't too difficult. It really seems to make things quite portable, which is what I am aiming for.
post #12 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdasch3 View Post

I was talking to one of my good gaming buddies tonight and was informed that instead of partitioning my external, I can simply use vmware player and setup the different operating systems and save everything to the external, this way I can simply open the virtual disk files whenever I feel in the mood to explore, right from the virtual player. I thought this was a pretty good alternative and avoided a lot of partitioning heartache, even though it isn't too difficult. It really seems to make things quite portable, which is what I am aiming for.

VMware of VirtualBox (also free) is definitely an option.

I thought someone suggested it? I know I meant to at one point but reading back hadn't. Either way, I think virtualisation is a better option for you for the time being.
post #13 of 29
Thread Starter 
It is a very nice option. I have a few extra flash drives as well that I could always make a bootable live disk of Linux just in case computer problems occur. Again, thanks for the help guys.
post #14 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdasch3 View Post

It is a very nice option. I have a few extra flash drives as well that I could always make a bootable live disk of Linux just in case computer problems occur. Again, thanks for the help guys.

Well the nice thing about virtual machines is you can take snapshots, so if you break something, roll back to your snapshot and you instantly have a working install again
post #15 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdasch3 View Post

I am sure this has already been posted, but I would rather not hijack another thread. As a bachelors student for Networking, it is probably long past due for me to jump into Linux.
I have a 500GB external hard drive which I plan to partition with Ubuntu, Fedora, and Windows server, while still keeping space for storage.
How much space do Linux Distros normally use? I am sure it is less than windows.

Depends on the distro, but most all of them use significantly less disk space than doze.
Quote:
While searching briefly online yesterday, I found that booting linux from disk will allow partitioning, but is there a way that will allow me to do so without burning to a disk? Partition and boot partition formatting tool of some kind?

There are Linux live CD's you can use to do this. GParted is a good one that is made precisely for partitioning disks.
Quote:
As a noob to Linux, I am also looking for any insight and potential information links. Does Linux use a different file system than NTFS? (as I will obviously need to format it that way).

No Linux does not use NTFS (thank God). Most distros will come out of the box with ext4 with the option to use the new btrfs (not stable yet) or some others like reiserfs or XFS. Ext4 is fine most most applications. Also, most Linux distros do come with a kernel module that allows you to read and write to NTFS partitions, so accessing data from Windows disks inside Linux should be no issue.
Quote:
I have done some reading already about the kernel, and how the operating system works. No need for me to jump into full customization. I am mainly looking for navigation tips (of course, I wont mind just clicking around), what applications might I run into and what they do, and maybe some useful command lines.

Clicking around will vary based on which desktop environment you are using. Is it Gnome3 or KDE or Unity or some other? If you're using Ubuntu, it will be Unity which has a main menu bar at the left of the screen. Pretty self explanatory. However, if you want to get to the nuts and bolts of Linux, you should really learn the command line syntax. Any BASH tutorial on the Internet should get you started. Just learn about how to navigate into directories, list items, move items, etc. Then you can get onto more advanced things.
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post #16 of 29
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Originally Posted by thiussat View Post

Also, most Linux distros do come with a kernel module that allows you to read and write to NTFS partitions, so accessing data from Windows disks inside Linux should be no issue.

Sorry to nitpick, but most Linux NTFS drivers I know of are read-only barring only ntfs-3g (which many distros ship by default) and that's a FUSE driver - not a kernel module.

Everything else you said was spot on though smile.gif
post #17 of 29
NTFS-3G is read/write now, but it's still a FUSE driver, and can't cope with complex stuff like encryption (I guess this is obvious, if you think about it)

Using Virtualbox is the way forward, but don't be afraid of installation. Even if either GRUB or Windows "messes up" the MBR, both Linux and Windows CDs will be able to restore it without any trouble. The key thing is not to panic (something you should have learnt being a network student anyway!)

Edit - Sorry Plan9, mis-read your post redface.gif
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post #18 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by chemicalfan View Post

NTFS-3G is read/write now, but it's still a FUSE driver, and can't cope with complex stuff like encryption (I guess this is obvious, if you think about it)
Using Virtualbox is the way forward, but don't be afraid of installation. Even if either GRUB or Windows "messes up" the MBR, both Linux and Windows CDs will be able to restore it without any trouble. The key thing is not to panic (something you should have learnt being a network student anyway!)
Edit - Sorry Plan9, mis-read your post redface.gif

lol no worries laugher.gif
post #19 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chemicalfan View Post

NTFS-3G is read/write now, but it's still a FUSE driver, and can't cope with complex stuff like encryption (I guess this is obvious, if you think about it)
Using Virtualbox is the way forward, but don't be afraid of installation. Even if either GRUB or Windows "messes up" the MBR, both Linux and Windows CDs will be able to restore it without any trouble. The key thing is not to panic (something you should have learnt being a network student anyway!)
Edit - Sorry Plan9, mis-read your post redface.gif

Yeah, I don't really panic much anymore. Sure, the adrenaline gets rushing because of the frustration sometimes, but there is almost always a fix right under your nose. I have setup a couple of the virtual machines on my external. Ubuntu and fedora are the two that I chose, but I also went with CentOS to get the hang of the more common red hat. I hear fedora and CentOS are fairly close to it. Ubuntu is extremely newb friendly from what I have seen and I will be watching tutorials and doing my reading. I plan to put windows server in a vm as well. I need to learn server configurations with both operating systems, and as many as I can at home. There are just some that I wont be able to learn without a hands on tech job. Other than that, I think I am good to go. While I am at it I will probably expand my windows cmd's knowledge.
post #20 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdasch3 View Post

While I am at it I will probably expand my windows cmd's knowledge.

That should take all of about 10 minutes wink.gif

Windows Powershell might interest you though
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