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Comparison between Linux and Windows? - Page 2

post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by thiussat View Post

That's because Linux kernel development is just done differently than Windows. Microsoft doesn't release new kernels all that often. They may patch it for security updates, but the Windows kernel remains stagnant for years. The only exception might be service packs. Linux, on the other hand, is releasing new kernels every several months
Kernels have nothing to do with it. We're talking APIs and ABIs - they're all user space just like application software is. The kernel is pretty much transparent to all but a very few developers.

Also NT hasn't stagnated for years - there's been massive changes to the kernel (lead by the MinWin project).
Quote:
Originally Posted by thiussat View Post

So, you're right, the API stability is a problem in Linux. Compound that with all the different distros and their separate release cycles, and writing binary software that just "works" is a major PITA like you said. Really, it doesn't matter if it's binary or open-source, the same problem applies. The best you can do is target the distro of your choice. Right now Ubuntu is probably the best choice since it is still the most popular. Otherwise, you are stuck compiling it for all the different distros with all their different dependencies, etc.

I code in python, which is pretty simple (an interpreted language), but even getting a python script to be installable across all distros with their different package managers is a PITA. So I just focus on Ubuntu.
I've admittedly not spent a great deal of time developing in Python (I've written a few XBMC plugins, but nothing too elaborate) so maybe I'm being naive here, but I always thought Python would be quite simple as you just have to tell the user to extract a source tar ball and set your main routine to be a shell script to check if Python is installed. eg:
Code:
#!/bin/sh

APP="My Application"

which python 2>&1 > /dev/null
if [ "$?" -ne 0 ]; then
        echo "Python not installed or not found in \$PATH."
        echo "Python vsersion n or greater is required to run $APP"
        exit 1
fi

# Yup, Python exists. Now lets start the program.
python ./$APP.py
What sort of problems do you run in to with packaging Python up? I'd be really interested to hear the sorts of problems and solutions you've found smile.gif

Most of my POSIX code is Perl (very portable on *nix), C++ or shell scripts.
post #12 of 16
BRIEFLY, rolleyes.gifrolleyes.gif

windows is developed behind closed doors. whatever those monkeys decide in the conference room on a Tuesday morning is what happens, like it or not.

Linux has wide open community oversight. There's great visibility to everything under the hood, no secrets. If anyone is unhappy with something, there's a channel to go through to get it corrected.

In the long run there's no argument which is better thumb.gif
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post #13 of 16
Linux = Free

Windows = Nag $ Nag $ Nag $
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post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plan9 View Post

What sort of problems do you run in to with packaging Python up? I'd be really interested to hear the sorts of problems and solutions you've found smile.gif
Most of my POSIX code is Perl (very portable on *nix), C++ or shell scripts.

What you're talking about is having the user manually install a script. Sure, that's cool, but people don't want to do that. If you want your script to get the most notice you must package it for the distro package manager. In Ubuntu's case, they have unofficial PPA's which is what I use. They work the same exact way as something from the official repository. For instance:
Code:
sudo apt-get install my_script

will install the entire package. Except in this case you don't have to go through all the hoopla of getting the package in the official repositories.

There are setup scripts you can write for python programs in order to have them install independent of package managers, but it's not worth the trouble, imo. With these "setup" scripts, there's no need for BASH scripting. It is all done in python.
Edited by thiussat - 4/20/12 at 8:40am
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post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by thiussat View Post

What you're talking about is having the user manually install a script. Sure, that's cool, but people don't want to do that. If you want your script to get the most notice you must package it for the distro package manager. In Ubuntu's case, they have unofficial PPA's which is what I use. They work the same exact way as something from the official repository. For instance:
Code:
sudo apt-get install my_script
will install the entire package. Except in this case you don't have to go through all the hoopla of getting the package in the official repositories.
There are setup scripts you can write for python programs in order to have them install independent of package managers, but it's not worth the trouble, imo. With these "setup" scripts, there's no need for BASH scripting. It is all done in python.

Ah cool. Thanks for the insight smile.gif
post #16 of 16
I found the learning curve of Linux to be a lot less steep now that I've got some background in C versus when I had none. IMHO (keyword being humble) people who ask "why is linux better?" or "how is linux compared to windows?" won't be able to fathom the difference between the two. Linux is aimed at people who see their computer as more than a glorified XBox. Windows is aimed at barely computer-literate people who want something that is idiotproof and "just works" and are willing to pay for the privilege if specialized software is required. Even on the most user-friendly distro there's always something that requires me to go beyond the UI and learn to configure and the key word there is learn. Having used Windows since 3.1, the only thing it's taught me is how to use Office and which third-party software to trust. Considering how long a time that's been (20 years?!) it's clearly been my most futile endeavour to date. Maybe it's my fault for not taking a pry-bar to it and forcibly hacking up Windows, but hey, I have fun using Linux so I don't think it has to do with me not having the will to learn.

So in conclusion, here's the comparison I draw:

Windows: Use me, idiot!
Linux: Welcome to school, idiot!
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