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Do I need to join the Ivy band wagon? - Page 2

post #11 of 64
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by UpgradeSolution View Post

Yeah, if you have dedicated graphics the IGU is useless. I would suggest the 2011 processor for you if you video and photo edit since it is 4 cores/8 threads which will work better since Premier and photoshop are both multithreaded!
Edit: the 3820 is only 4core 8 thread but 2011 is better since it can have the 3930k which is 6c/12t

Thank you for confirming. I was only guessing that the integrated graphics included in the 3770k is not going to be of use if I have a dedicated graphics card.

I'm wondering why they included that...
post #12 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by shogrran View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by UpgradeSolution View Post

Yeah, if you have dedicated graphics the IGU is useless. I would suggest the 2011 processor for you if you video and photo edit since it is 4 cores/8 threads which will work better since Premier and photoshop are both multithreaded!
Edit: the 3820 is only 4core 8 thread but 2011 is better since it can have the 3930k which is 6c/12t

Thank you for confirming. I was only guessing that the integrated graphics included in the 3770k is not going to be of use if I have a dedicated graphics card.

I'm wondering why they included that...

They do it because AMD did it first and they can't let AMD have something they don't. Also it helps manufacturers keep prices down for prebuilts.
post #13 of 64
nha stick to 32 nm!the 22 nm isnt remotly there and amd will have catched up to intel by then.so nobody with any chrystal bal can know how the futur will pan out!intel might want to pray to any technology god out there that amd doesnt find a cooling solution cause if they do it is the only thing holding them back!some would say,what about their porly designed proc,dont sweat it next evolution will either have been fixed manually (like they have always been done in the past)or they will have optimised the program doing the job!ati is in the stable, people might think they are fully integrated !but i doubt it!cause if it had we wouldnt get these insane graphic solution.so amd isnt stuck they can ask ati for help,the question isnt if they re gona ask ati,the question is more;will amd be willing to shell the cost to optimise?not one engineer want to work on something and see their idea shelved because an bureaucrat decided he wanted his resumé to look good by optimising the financial result of amd (cost cutting)
Edited by drbaltazar - 4/30/12 at 8:51am
post #14 of 64
Sorry for the confusion. The cheapest X79 (socket 2011) motherboard on newegg is $200, where as for $200 on a socket 1155, you can get a pretty high end board. You'll get more motherboard for your buck on 1155. If you want to get a similar tier board, it will cost more for the X79 one, though prices seem to have come down a little.
I guess the i7-3820 (seriously intel, the naming system was nice until these and IB came out) is better than I thought. You can OC it, but it OCs a little differently than the i7-3770k. The i7-3770k is a pretty simple OC, where as the 3820 is a little more complicated and will take more to set up and optimize. Whether you would enjoy this is up to you.
The ivy bridge processors use less power than the socket 2011 ones, so if you're looking to keep electricity costs in check, that's another plus for the ivy.
Concerning the 'dead' vs 'live' sockets, dead means that no new CPUs will be coming out to fit that socket. Live is the opposite. There have been rumors (or maybe it was confirmed) that ivy bridge-E (socket 2011) was cancelled, which would make 2011 just as dead as 1155 (or maybe even more dead, as there are rumors of a new ivy bridge on 1155 slated for Q3, but again, more rumors).
The 2011 line is the enthusiast line, and the only option available for 6 core intel processors. It also has some other features such as quad channel memory, more PCI lanes, and such, but if you don't need them, then that's a wash. 1155 seems like the better call to me because it's more main stream, a little cheaper, newer tech, and will have more support from the community for OCing and things like that. But you really can't go wrong with either socket.
post #15 of 64
FYI- Based on heat and power issues for Ivy Bridge, most overclockers are sticking with Sandy Bridge instead.

http://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/news/2171299/intel-admits-ivy-bridge-chips-run-hotter
post #16 of 64
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AMD4ME View Post

FYI- Based on heat and power issues for Ivy Bridge, most overclockers are sticking with Sandy Bridge instead.
http://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/news/2171299/intel-admits-ivy-bridge-chips-run-hotter

Exectly why this confuses me. I was reading around and from what I remember, lowering to 22nm manufacturing process should be good for temperatures. But I have read 2 posts already saying that ivy bridge has higher temps. Why is that? Isn't that a major fail considering that they switched to 22nm?

@Molybdenum ahh, so if I understand you correctly, for the same amount of money I get a higher end board for the 1155 rather than on the socket 2011? Good point. But from what my previous processors tell me, I shouldn't be worrying too much about a high end board for any processor at this point. I kinda feel that later down the road, DDR4 would suddenly pop up and then that will be a good upgrade opportunity for either socket - and when that time comes, I would have regretted getting a super high end board for just ddr3. Just like what happened on my current set up. It's socket 775 and initially I got a high end board which is ddr2 and then comes these boards with ddr3 option.

@UpgradeSolution I thought so as well. Having integrated graphics would be good for people who don't plan on getting dedicated graphics card. I imagine that cuts the price of having to buy a separate graphics card. Works for people who want to set up computers for computer shops and for companies who don't want to spend extra on graphics card since their computers are for work only. But what is confusing is why do they have high end processors WITH the integrated graphics as well. I'm thinking those who'd want to buy the high end processors would be using it for high end processing e.g. video and photo editing and graphics and physics -- which will also require them to buy a graphics card anyway. So what was the point there. But oh well, I'm not intel.
post #17 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by shogrran View Post

Exectly why this confuses me. I was reading around and from what I remember, lowering to 22nm manufacturing process should be good for temperatures. But I have read 2 posts already saying that ivy bridge has higher temps. Why is that? Isn't that a major fail considering that they switched to 22nm?

It's just that the die for sandy/ivy has the cores all lined up beside each other. Switching to 22nm just made it that much harder for the heat to release into the IHS. Yes switching to 22nm did end up in lower power and voltage, but the heat is much more concentrated in the cores and has less surface area to release said heat into the IHS.
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post #18 of 64
I just upgraded to a Asus P8Z77-V mobo with a i7-2600k CPU. The Z77 allows Lucid to function where the iGPU on the CPU can work alongside your GTX/HD XXX discrete gpu. Not sure what benefit yet it does, still getting everything fully setup, not sure how to test yet.

Also the onboard GPU is great for troubleshooting say if your GPU dies you do not have to change graphics cards, simply change a setting in BIOS (or maybe in windows program?) and you can debug the system.

You get a Ton of features for pretty decent cost.
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post #19 of 64
This may be a dumb question but can someone clarify how the integrated GPU will work with an external GPU? Can you literally combine them to work in combination to one another or would they both be isolated? If you can combine them are there any good benchmarks showing them working in unison?
post #20 of 64
http://www.overclock.net/t/1239164/tt-lucid-virtu-mvp-hyperformance-tested-with-asrock-z77-extreme6-and-intel-ivy-bridge
That might explain it better. I'm still learning it myself.

But yes it offloads some stuff to the iGPU.

Or maybe this review is better
http://www.anandtech.com/show/5728/intel-z77-panther-point-chipset-and-motherboard-preview-asrock-asus-gigabyte-msi-ecs-and-biostar/2
Edited by Aparition - 4/30/12 at 9:56am
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