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Do I need to join the Ivy band wagon? - Page 5

post #41 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by shogrran View Post

I am not sure how people would know which is a dead socket and which isn't. I know for sure my 775 is already a dead socket but that is dead obvious. Who really knows maybe both of these sockets are dead? Maybe there's a socket 3000? Not unless you're intel employees that is.

I think people are saying it because they have seen the Haswell leaked intel slide that shows the new sockets. 1155 will last you for a good while though. Most users on OCN do strictly entertainment on their PCs. You don't need 8 threads, hardware or software, to play a game, watch a movie, browse the internet. Intel even went to the lengths of trying to bridge users that want to do some heavy loads such as video encoding with QuickSync.
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post #42 of 64
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skrumzy View Post

I think people are saying it because they have seen the Haswell leaked intel slide that shows the new sockets. 1155 will last you for a good while though. Most users on OCN do strictly entertainment on their PCs. You don't need 8 threads, hardware or software, to play a game, watch a movie, browse the internet. Intel even went to the lengths of trying to bridge users that want to do some heavy loads such as video encoding with QuickSync.

Even with that said, whether 1155 or 2011 is a dead socket or not, it bears little relevance to the road map I'll be taking. Even if in the future newer processors come out still under the 1155 socket it really does nothing for me since I'd bet that there'll be other better motherboards that will come out as well and you'll have to upgrade your motherboard anyway. The same goes for socket 2011. Whether they release a new processor line still in the socket 2011, you'd be forced to upgrade your motherboard anyway.
post #43 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by shogrran View Post

Even with that said, whether 1155 or 2011 is a dead socket or not, it bears little relevance to the road map I'll be taking. Even if in the future newer processors come out still under the 1155 socket it really does nothing for me since I'd bet that there'll be other better motherboards that will come out as well and you'll have to upgrade your motherboard anyway. The same goes for socket 2011. Whether they release a new processor line still in the socket 2011, you'd be forced to upgrade your motherboard anyway.

So why bother dumping a pocket load now when in less then 2 years your machine will be dated? I been saying this all along, nothing can touch a 2500k right now and I highly doubt no game will for the next year. Some people have money beyond belief, and has to own everything that's brand new and the best, every time something comes out. Then there is people like us (me) who buy what will get him by at the right price without missing a single beat in the gaming world. I have high doubts both the 1155 and 2011 platforms will see another processor. Motherboards will be outdated and beyond update by then, some people are still running P67. Haswell will come with a entirely new socket 1150, I mean come on this is Intel we are talking about here... I guess the honest decision here would be to either go all out and blow what you got on 2011, or go cheap to get you by until Haswell.
Edited by Warmonger - 5/2/12 at 4:33am
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post #44 of 64
im with you guys on this one. who cares if there is another processor for a given socket... by the time i consider this slow i will want a new mobo anyway...
post #45 of 64
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Warmonger View Post

So why bother dumping a pocket load now when in less then 2 years your machine will be dated? I been saying this all along, nothing can touch a 2500k right now and I highly doubt no game will for the next year. Some people have money beyond belief, and has to own everything that's brand new and the best, every time something comes out. Then there is people like us (me) who buy what will get him by at the right price without missing a single beat in the gaming world. I have high doubts both the 1155 and 2011 platforms will see another processor. Motherboards will be outdated and beyond update by then, some people are still running P67. Haswell will come with a entirely new socket 1150, I mean come on this is Intel we are talking about here... I guess the honest decision here would be to either go all out and blow what you got on 2011, or go cheap to get you by until Haswell.

At this point what I'm looking for is the sweet spot between price performance and longevity. Now with the price and performance the 2500K might still have that sweet spot. But with the longevity... i don't think so. Am I using the correct term? Longevity?
post #46 of 64
http://www.microcenter.com/single_product_results.phtml?product_id=0383144

The 3820 is $229 at MicroCenter if you've got them around. And their X79 boards are $250-350. Youc an upgrade/trade to an IB-E down the road if it turns out to be a killer, and you will have a high level system for 3-5 years no problem.

Hmm.. I've got a $290 Ivy Bridge + $220 P8Z77 that are within their return period. Maybe I can have a high level system too. thinking.gif
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post #47 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by shogrran View Post

At this point what I'm looking for is the sweet spot between price performance and longevity. Now with the price and performance the 2500K might still have that sweet spot. But with the longevity... i don't think so. Am I using the correct term? Longevity?

The term Longevity is used loosely on this forum, as is "future proofing". I'm sure a 3820 will last you quite a while even after Haswell. If you don't normally update your machine and wish to have the best bang for your buck while dumping a bit of cash in it. Then the 3820 would be a good decision, the only downside is its partially locked and doesn't come with PCIe 3.0. Other then that it is a work horse of a processor. On the other hand 3770k's im sure surpass the 3820 in benchmarks and cost around the same general price, with motherboards being a tad cheaper. If you don't plan on overclocking then the 3770k would be your ticket. If you plan on overclocking then you might want to consider the 3820. The 3770k will go up to 4.5Ghz no problem with acceptable temperatures, which is trading blows with 4.7Ghz 2700k or so. So really its up to whether you plan on overclocking, and how high.
Edited by Warmonger - 5/2/12 at 2:49pm
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post #48 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Warmonger View Post

The term Longevity is used loosely on this forum, as is "future proofing". I'm sure a 3820 will last you quite a while even after Haswell. If you don't normally update your machine and wish to have the best bang for your buck while dumping a bit of cash in it. Then the 3820 would be a good decision, the only downside is its partially locked and doesn't come with PCIe 3.0. Other then that it is a work horse of a processor. On the other hand 3770k's im sure surpass the 3820 in benchmarks and cost around the same general price, with motherboards being a tad cheaper. If you don't plan on overclocking then the 3770k would be your ticket. If you plan on overclocking then you might want to consider the 3820. The 3770k will go up to 4.5Ghz no problem with acceptable temperatures, which is trading blows with 4.7Ghz 2700k or so. So really its up to whether you plan on overclocking, and how high.

The 3820 actually overclocks quite well; some have even hit 5.0GHz and beyond using the BLCK straps. Most fall somewhere between 4.2 and 4.8 for various reasons, same as regular Sandy Bridge. wink.gif See here for a huge thread with lots of user feedback and results:

http://www.overclock.net/t/1221208/i7-3820-overclock/

Also, the 3820 most certainly can utilize PCIE 3.0 - just like its bigger siblings the 3930K and 3960X, and Ivy Bridge relatives. Using an HD 7950/7970 you will readily be using PCIE 3.0 on an X79 motherboard along with the 3820, same as any other LGA2011 CPU. Only Nvidia has PCIE 3.0 disabled with its drivers, for reasons currently unknown. Therefore, the only 3.0 card Nvidia has right now on the market, the GTX 680, will only work under 2.0, but, this is true whether if you are using LGA1155 or LGA2011.

Really, once the 2600K/2700K, 3770K, and 3820 are all overclocked within the same frequency range, they will all perform relatively the same, or at least close enough to call it splitting hairs. Therefore, in my opinion, the biggest differentiator is *not* performance, but what features you want from the respective platform (ie. 16 PCIE lanes vs 40, native USB 3.0, Quick Sync, Virtu MVP, IGP, etc.). thumb.gif
     
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post #49 of 64
Thread Starter 
Im not really going to overclock the processor now that much. Probably just a few tweaks here and there if it's possible to 'copy' my current set up wherein my processor clocks up to 3.0Ghz from 2.4Ghz only during gaming.

I'll probably fully overclock the processor only when it reaches the end of it's lifespan. So I can squeeze more out of it and still feel the difference.
post #50 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by covert ash View Post

The 3820 actually overclocks quite well; some have even hit 5.0GHz and beyond using the BLCK straps. Most fall somewhere between 4.2 and 4.8 for various reasons, same as regular Sandy Bridge. wink.gif See here for a huge thread with lots of user feedback and results:
http://www.overclock.net/t/1221208/i7-3820-overclock/
Also, the 3820 most certainly can utilize PCIE 3.0 - just like its bigger siblings the 3930K and 3960X, and Ivy Bridge relatives. Using an HD 7950/7970 you will readily be using PCIE 3.0 on an X79 motherboard along with the 3820, same as any other LGA2011 CPU. Only Nvidia has PCIE 3.0 disabled with its drivers, for reasons currently unknown. Therefore, the only 3.0 card Nvidia has right now on the market, the GTX 680, will only work under 2.0, but, this is true whether if you are using LGA1155 or LGA2011.
Really, once the 2600K/2700K, 3770K, and 3820 are all overclocked within the same frequency range, they will all perform relatively the same, or at least close enough to call it splitting hairs. Therefore, in my opinion, the biggest differentiator is *not* performance, but what features you want from the respective platform (ie. 16 PCIE lanes vs 40, native USB 3.0, Quick Sync, Virtu MVP, IGP, etc.). thumb.gif
Strange enough Intel's website says it only utilizes PCIe 2.0.
Quote:
Originally Posted by shogrran View Post

Im not really going to overclock the processor now that much. Probably just a few tweaks here and there if it's possible to 'copy' my current set up wherein my processor clocks up to 3.0Ghz from 2.4Ghz only during gaming.
I'll probably fully overclock the processor only when it reaches the end of it's lifespan. So I can squeeze more out of it and still feel the difference.
Intel's turbo boost will clock up the chip from its stock clock when your machine requires extra power on its own. The 3820 goes from 3.6Ghz to 3.8Ghz, and the 3770k goes from 3.5Ghz to 3.9Ghz. If overclocking isn't your thing and your more about lifespan of the unit, the 3770k might be the better buy. Not only is it faster then the 3820 out of the box, its only rated for 77w compared to the 3820's 130w. It will shave $$ off of your electric bill if your a frequent pc user. With the right cooler you can take it up to 4.5Ghz, and should maintain temps around 77C. The barrier on Sandy Bridge is 5.0Ghz, then you would be pushing dangerous volts. So the typical clock for 2500k's is 4.5Ghz, and the typical clock for 2700k's is 4.8Ghz with a few at 5.0Ghz for the e-peen. More over the average is around 4.5Ghz, so if your a overclocker seeking high clocks and max performance its Sandy Bridge (i7 3820). Else if your a stock kinda guy the 3770k would dominate the field for its price point.
Edited by Warmonger - 5/3/12 at 8:09am
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