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Installing a Temperature Sensor

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Hey,

I was thinking about buying this sensor
http://www.amazon.de/gp/product/B001IQ0L2M/ref=oh_details_o00_s00_i00
and have it hanging outside of my case to monitor the temperature of the incoming air.

The bad thing is, I don't know where to put it onto my mainboard, or if it's even possible.

I have a ASUS P8Z68-V Pro mainboard.
(large pic of the mb http://www.ixbt.com/mainboard/asus/p8z68-v-pro/board.jpg )

Any advice given would be very much appreciated
Edited by ZwuckeL - 4/30/12 at 6:09pm
post #2 of 10
Thread Starter 
A little more information on that would be great
post #3 of 10
top right coner of pick of mother board
post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 
What pins do I have to use then? AAFP turned on HD or AC97? What program can read the sensor ?

I searched google but haven't found a thing about this technique.
post #5 of 10
post #6 of 10
Thread Starter 
there is no such option in CoreTemp. neither did you answer the other questions. you're an utterly bad troll.
post #7 of 10
cause im bored, all the bolds are the ones i figured are obvious TOS violations, mostly cause of posting wrong info, a link that goes no where related to this topic (and it isnt, its a program for something else and not directly related to solving this)
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CPUMotherboardGraphicsGraphics
2600k  asus sabertooth p67 EVGA GTX570 EVGA GTX570 
RAMHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
Kingston genesis Western Digital Caviar Black 500gig Corsair Force 3 Lg Blu Ray 
CoolingCoolingCoolingOS
H100 noctua nzxt Windows 7 64 bit 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
Samsung 42In Tv Logitic wave Corsair HX1000 NZXT Phantom 
MouseAudio
Logitech Wave logitech 
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post #8 of 10
i am a troll sary i am not trying to be i just doing what i can
post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZwuckeL View Post

Hey,
I was thinking about buying this sensor
http://www.amazon.de/gp/product/B001IQ0L2M/ref=oh_details_o00_s00_i00
and have it hanging outside of my case to monitor the temperature of the incoming air.
The bad thing is, I don't know where to put it onto my mainboard, or if it's even possible.
I have a ASUS P8Z68-V Pro mainboard.
(large pic of the mb http://www.ixbt.com/mainboard/asus/p8z68-v-pro/board.jpg )
Any advice given would be very much appreciated

The temp sensor linked above uses a standard 2-pin temp connector.

It can be plugged into a temp sensor header of a motherboard and then you can access the reading with a motherboard utility.
For example, Asus Crosshair IV Formula:-
493

However, not all motherboards have temp sensor header. And I have checked your AsusP8Z68-V Pro User Manual and confirm that it does not have one, unfortunately.

So, in order to use that sensor cable, you can:-

(1) connect the 2-pin header to a 5.25'' or 3.5'' bay device (usually a fan controller) that has temp sensor header available.
The pic below shows Reeven Six Eyes fan controller which can also display temperature reading from sensor. The green circle refers to those 2-pin connector that can be used to display the reading.
271

(2) use a stand-alone temp display
Here is a good page to select one:-http://www.aquatuning.co.uk/index.php/cat/c129_Temperature-displays.html

This one even comes with the sensor. It is a good inexpensive choice if you have no fan to control and you only need one temp sensor:- http://www.aquatuning.co.uk/product_info.php/info/p666_Thermometer-with-digital-display---red.html

Another alternative:= http://www.parts-express.com/pe/showdetl.cfm?Partnumber=320-520
Edited by windfire - 5/1/12 at 12:03am
post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thank You very much for this detailed information, windfire. Too bad my motherboard doesn't have one of these connectors :/ I Guess I will go with one of these cheap thermometers:)
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