Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Memory › Buying New memory
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Buying New memory

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
I currently have a 790FX-GD70 mobo with a 955BE C3
Im looking into buying more memory that is 1600 and can get good timings

I been looking at the samsung 30nm chips and am quite impressed with peoples' results but I don't really feel comfy overclocking memory.

Another thing is that I dunno what I would see a performance in.
Would a chip at 1600 CAS9 be better than lets say 1333 CAS7?
post #2 of 5
I would look for 1600@7-7-7 or 8-8-8. Or you can buy 1866@9-9-9 an clock it to 1600@7-8-7. You can find lots of options. But in your case since you don't want to overclock go for 1600mhz with the lowest timing you can find.


These are some options.


1600@6-8-6

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231351



Not sure if your board will do 4gb sticks. But this would be good also.

1600@7-7-7

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820226305
post #3 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by MuzicFreq View Post

I currently have a 790FX-GD70 mobo with a 955BE C3
Im looking into buying more memory that is 1600 and can get good timings
I been looking at the samsung 30nm chips and am quite impressed with peoples' results but I don't really feel comfy overclocking memory.
Another thing is that I dunno what I would see a performance in.
Would a chip at 1600 CAS9 be better than lets say 1333 CAS7?

MuzicFreq-

I just answered a similar RAM question so I'll post some of that info. here so you can learn from the links and info.

It depends on what your goal is. If you need more RAM for some reason then you can add to your existing RAM or buy one matched RAM kit, as mixing of DDR3 RAM is not always successful. In actual use you will not be able to tell the difference between 1333 MHz. @ CL7 and 1600 MHz. @ CL9.

As far as what is better higher frequency or tighter latencies, there is only a minute difference in both when the RAM frequency is at or above ~1333 MHz. As frequency increases one clock cycle decreases in real time so CL7 vs. CL9 @ ~1333 MHz. and higher makes almost no difference at all in real applications. In synthetic benches these minute changes show up but they do not carry over to significant gains in real world applications.

Independent testing by Tom's Hardware, AnandTech, X-Bit Labs and OCN member "damric" show no significant gains in real applications on typical desktop AMD or Intel PCs with RAM frequencies above ~1333 MHz. excluding Llano APUs where the GPU section benefits from the higher RAM frequency. The reason there are no significant gains is because DDR3 @ ~1333 MHz. is not a system bottleneck as older, slower DDR and DDR2 RAM was. See the link for details if interested.

http://www.overclock.net/t/1237178/is-o-cing-my-ram-worth-the-trouble/10#post_16866022

If you plan to add more RAM instead of purchasing one matched RAM kit, then the best chance of getting the two RAM kits to function without issues is by buying the same exact model RAM.

As Corsair and others have advised, mixing of DIMMs or RAM kits even of the same part number does NOT guarantee that the mixed RAM will function at the Advertised frequency and latencies of a SINGLE DIMM or RAM Kit. So you may be forced to loosen the latencies to make the two RAM kits function without issue. Only testing can determine what works with your CPU/mobo/RAM.

http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/Understanding-RAM-Timings/26

http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/152
Edited by AMD4ME - 5/1/12 at 10:25am
post #4 of 5
Quote:
Would a chip at 1600 CAS9 be better than lets say 1333 CAS7?

In synthetics the results are pretty much near-equal, with the edge slightly but not with merit in favour of 1600 @ CL9.

post #5 of 5
^^^ But in real apps there is no visible diff.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Memory
Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Memory › Buying New memory