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What is the most significant CPU architecture ever? - Page 2

Poll Results: What is the most significant CPU architecture ever?

 
  • 1% (1)
    anything pre 286
  • 0% (0)
    80286
  • 0% (0)
    80386
  • 0% (0)
    80486
  • 1% (1)
    P5
  • 0% (0)
    K5 and K6
  • 1% (1)
    P6
  • 5% (3)
    K7
  • 0% (0)
    Netburst
  • 47% (25)
    K8
  • 26% (14)
    Core 2
  • 0% (0)
    K10
  • 1% (1)
    Nehelem and Westmere
  • 3% (2)
    Bulldozer
  • 9% (5)
    Sandy Bridge and Ivy Bridge
  • 0% (0)
    All others (post 286)
53 Total Votes  
post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by macca_dj View Post

I thought Intel used the memory controller on the mobo going back some time now and then AMD made a cpu with one on the die and that was how AMD took the lead in the cpu market and then Intel copied Amd by putting the mem controller on die too

Yep, pretty much.
post #12 of 20
Its just a shame that AMD did not have copyright / ownership on that specific technology because Intel would have been so far behind,

but as it was Intel implemented it and took the market back from AMD,

I like AMD because they do appear to have more gonads than Intel when it comes to making new technologies and trying something new,

Like as of the old days the on die memory controller, X64 architecture and the latest offerings with Bulldozer and Vishera redesigning the CPU's Architecture once again,
It is just unfortunate that the Intel fan base is a little harsh towards AMD but then a majority of them probably don't know the history of the two rivals they have just picked up on Intel is faster so I will go that way,

I am not to sure what Intel has actually developed on die ?
some one should make a list of what the two rivals have brought to the table through innovation,
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RIG 1
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post #13 of 20
K8 for sure! I bought a Athlon 64 when it was released and I also used it with Windows XP 64-bit beta. I haven't been as impressed with a processor release since then.
post #14 of 20
k8, by far the most important microprocessor of recent time.
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Ryzen 2017
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CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD R7 1700 @ 3.95GHz - 1.425V Asus Prime X370 Pro Nvidia Geforce GTX 1080Ti FE 2000/6000 @ 1.025v 16GB (2x8GB) G.Skill DDR4 2933MHz CL16-16-16-35 1T 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
BPX 120GB NVMe SSD *boot* Intel 730 Series 240GB SSD Crucial BX100 1TB SSD Asus DVDRW 
CoolingOSMonitorKeyboard
Noctua NH-D15 Windows 10 Pro x64 Acer XG270HU 1440P 144Hz Freesync Cougar 600k Mechanical 
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Seasonic x1050w Antec 1100 V2 Razer Deathadder Elite Steelseries QCK Heavy 
Audio
Plantronics Rig 500e 
CPUCPUMotherboardGraphics
Opteron 4226 6 core Valencia 2.7GHz Opteron 4226 6 core Valencia 2.7GHz Asus KCMA-D8 Nvidia GT 520 1GB DDR3 
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32GB (4GBx8) Kingston 1066 ECC DDR3 (4x) Hitachi 500GB 7200RPM HDD's out of an old NAS Lightscribe CD/DVDRW Xubuntu 16.04 
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post #15 of 20
I would say K7 (first gen athlon) which was the first to reach 1 gigahertz and really broke boundaries.

Although the Pentium II (p6) were very fast for their time
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Rabasu i7-3770K
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Seagate 1TB Seagate 1TB Sony DVDRW stock 
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Windows 7 x64 BenQ E2220 1080p Seasonic M12II Evo 620W Coolermaster Elite 430 
Mouse
A4tech X7 710BH 
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AMD FX 6100 4.0 Ghz 6-core Asus M5A78L-MLX3 AM3+ Powercolor HD7730 1GB DDR5 16GB (2x8GB) Corsair Vengeance LP 1600 
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Seagate 1TB Seagate 1TB Sony DVDRW CoolerMaster Hyper212+ with 2x140mm Deepcool UF140 
OSMonitorPowerCase
Windows 7 x64 / Mint x64 BenQ E2220 1080p Aerocool Strike-X 500watts CoolerMaster Elite 430 
Mouse
A4tech X7 710BH 
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A8 7410 2.5Ghz Radeon R5 M335 2GB 4GB DDR3L 1 TB HDD 
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post #16 of 20
My old Cyrix 6x86 isn't on this list. I was impressed with it at the time, however I wouldn't change my vote for K8 if it was there.wink.gif
post #17 of 20
Core 2 gets my vote because I think it was the dual core CPU that saved Intel after the Pentium D/Pentium 4 proved that hyperthreading alone could not meet the demands of consumers. Also if it wasn't for K8, Intel would have stuck with hyperthreading for a lot longer than it should have. I feel bad saying that if it wasn't for the Athlon X2 series, Intel would not have had the push for dual core CPUs.

So I guess maybe K8 was the most significant architecture because that's what really got the ball rolling.
Edited by aweir - 11/1/12 at 7:07pm
post #18 of 20
K8, hands down.
post #19 of 20
Sandy Bridge. That gen completely blew my mind with it's performance. Rocking a dual core laptop i5 and it blows our C2D imac out of the water (closest thing in my house I can compare it too).
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post #20 of 20
Tough call between the K7 and K8, but opted for the K8 in the end. K7 was certainly significant though.
 
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Dell iDRAC6 Enterprise Mellanox Connectx-2 10Gb SFP+ NIC 
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Intel Xeon E5-2670 v1 Intel Xeon E5-2670 v1 SuperMicro X9DRL-iF 64GB Kingston ECC (kvr16r11d4/16HA) 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveCooling
12x 4TB HGST 5K4000 SanDisk SSD 960GB (cache) 6x 8TB WD Red Scythe AP-29 
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2x Noctua U9DXi4 FreeNAS Corsair AX750 Norco RPC-4224 
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