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Where do I find TDP info for Motherboards?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
Hey all,

Currently planning my first WC setup and can't seem to find any concrete info regarding the heat various NB's and SB's produce.

From what I can gather, most mobo only loops I've come across use 1 or 2x (120/140mm) radiators...

I have my eye the upcoming / currently being released z77 chipset.

Will 1x rx360 be overkill for a mobo only loop?

Anyone know where I can get a hold of actual TDP figures for NB + SB of various boards?

Thanks in advance!
post #2 of 7
A 360 for a mobo only loop? Discarding the fact that a mobo only loop is totally pointless, a 360 is overkill for a cpu, let alone a mobo.

Honestly, it is way more cost efficient to do a single loop for everything. Temperatures will not be different if you do multiple loops and there is absolutely no point in doing a mobo only loop.

As for how much heat they actually put out, I don't have any hard numbers, but I would think it would be 50W max.
post #3 of 7
Not sure I am totally following you on this. You are looking to only cool the VRM's, and SB (Since Sandy Bridge the NB is part of the CPU) but not the CPU or GPU??

I haven't seen TDP figures for the latest mobo's but they are cooled by passive heat sinks so it has to be fairly low compared to a CPU or GPU. If you were going to run a mobo only cooling loop, a single 120mm rad would probably be more than enough to keep it cool. The reason most people water cool their motherboards is because they water cool the CPU and GPU taking away two sources of air movement to cool the mobo. A few decent case fans solves this without having to buy another block and running more complex loops to add in the mobo.

I have a Z68 Maximus IV Extreme-Z board with 16GIG of Vengence RAM and I am running my 2700k at 5.2GHz (1.488v) with my ram at 1866MHz (1.65v) with out a block on my mobo. Focus on your CPU and GPU first before you look adding water to your mobo.

Using a Inland IR thermal reader I got a whopping 45.2C off the heat sinks over the VRM's and 38.6C on the south bridge.

2cents.gif
 
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post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 
Oh, you got me all wrong! (well sort of wink.gif )

CPU + GPU(s if I can muster up the $) are certainly going to go under water!

I just wanted to find out the thermal figures for the motherboard chips and vrms to better plan the loop(s - not sure about making more than one now...)

I was planning multiple loops to prevent chips with different thermal capacities from getting too hot, but in looking over more data (and your helpful posts!), it seems that an adequate / bordering on overkill radiator array will keep everything well within thermal limits, not to mention reduce the overall system cost!
post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by CooooooooL View Post

Oh, you got me all wrong! (well sort of wink.gif )
CPU + GPU(s if I can muster up the $) are certainly going to go under water!
I just wanted to find out the thermal figures for the motherboard chips and vrms to better plan the loop(s - not sure about making more than one now...)
I was planning multiple loops to prevent chips with different thermal capacities from getting too hot, but in looking over more data (and your helpful posts!), it seems that an adequate / bordering on overkill radiator array will keep everything well within thermal limits, not to mention reduce the overall system cost!

Yes a single loop is always the recommended way of doing things. Don't need to buy multiple reservoirs, less pumps, and same performance. All around win I would think. Obviously some people like doing multiple loops for aesthetic reasons (or they just like burning money, either one works), but there is no performance reason to do it.

IMO it is usually much easier to route 1 loop than 2 as well, gives your case a cleaner look. Really you shouldn't worry about the mobo too much at all. If you are already cooling a CPU + GPU the mobo will have a negligible effect on the heat in the loop.
post #6 of 7
Also keep in mind that as long as you have a reasonable amount of cooling capability, you're not going to be increasing the temp of the motherboard compared to running it on air. If you've got a 10C water delta or less (very typical), even with everything else at full load the motherboard temps will be lower than they had been on air. You'd need to be seriously overloading a loop to actually increase those temps.
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post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by CooooooooL View Post

Anyone know where I can get a hold of actual TDP figures for NB + SB of various boards?

You might've had trouble searching for it because the terms northbridge and southbridge don't apply to modern Intel chipsets anymore since most if not all of the traditional functions of the NB have been incorporated directly onto the CPU die itself. The main controller chip for current intel chipsets is called the Platform Controller Hub (PCH).

Max TDP for the z77 PCH is 6.7W as per the intel specs. ark.intel.com is a great place for such info.
Edited by threephi - 5/6/12 at 10:07pm
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