Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Monitors and Displays › Microcenter now carrying the 27" 2560x1440 Korean IPS monitors
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Microcenter now carrying the 27" 2560x1440 Korean IPS monitors - Page 94

post #931 of 1116
Quote:
Originally Posted by MenacingTuba View Post

Using a different input shouldn't make any difference in terms of input lag. The input lag usually remains the same at lower resolutions unless the display has a weird lag inducing scaler, but I doubt these do.

The Catleap should work (the single input CrossOver 27Q LED-P I used did) with a PS3 if you set it to 720p and uncheck the other resolutions (480 &1080p) if you use a dual-link dvi-hdmi cord or adapter. Most console games run @1280x720p or even lower resolutions. Blu-ray movies will work too.
As already stated 100 times in this thread, yes, the Auria's scaler produces lag, all scalers produce lag and it is noticeable.
post #932 of 1116
Quote:
Originally Posted by MenacingTuba View Post

Using a different input shouldn't make any difference in terms of input lag. The input lag usually remains the same at lower resolutions unless the display has a weird lag inducing scaler, but I doubt these do.

The Catleap should work (the single input CrossOver 27Q LED-P I used did) with a PS3 if you set it to 720p and uncheck the other resolutions (480 &1080p) if you use a dual-link dvi-hdmi cord or adapter. Most console games run @1280x720p or even lower resolutions. Blu-ray movies will work too.

I know this is possible, but I've heard from many people it looks awful. That's what happens I guess when you try to stretch 720p to fit a 1440p screen. It also has one port, (not so much of a big deal) but I'll have to buy an adapter and switch the cord between the two frequently.
post #933 of 1116
Hi, I've been lurking for awhile and I want to first say that I really appreciate the long discussion and wealth of information on this Auria monitor thread. Thanks everyone!

So I bit the bullet and got mine online since I'm on the west coast (too bad I couldn't get the open box discount, but it's still a good deal). It came in just earlier today and I've been testing it.

Just from the box, I knew I received the matte version which I'm fine with. I'm not sure if I could stand a super glossy glass screen.

Right out of the box, I mounted it to the Monoprice adjustable mount which seems to work pretty well. Then I turned it on and did my dead pixel tests and luckily only got 1 tiny one in the upper right hand corner which I'll never really notice. Glad it's not in the middle of the screen. I've tried various techniques to see if I can get it unstuck, but I think it's dead (vs stuck) and there's isn't much I can do with it. I'm not too upset about this.

What's concerning me is the fact that it's wide gamut and I have to find the best way to get it calibrated correctly hopefully without buying $150~ hardware to help me. I do some digital graphic work so I'm pleased that I'm getting a wide gamut, but by default obviously the reds are really over saturated.

I've done my initial calibration with the basic Mac and Windows tools--using a Macbook Pro Retina here with bootcamp so the mini DP to DP cable from Monoprice works great--and can only get so far with the tools the OSes provide me with. The OSD didn't really change anything while in OSX, but when I went into Windows then the changes from the OSD made a difference. With the OSD, I've set it to similar settings that were in earlier pages of this thread, but this still wouldn't fix the oversaturation.

Then I tried from the nVidia Control Panel and used "Adjust Desktop Color Settings" to help with the over saturation. What actually really helped was the "Digital Vibrance" setting and dropping it from 50% to about 39% based on just eyeing the reds.

These settings seem fine, but I'm wondering if I'm not optimizing to the truest color that I can.

I know each monitor is a little different, so I'm not sure if loading ICC color profiles that other people have posted works. Will it? And can someone give me advice on a profile to use? Or how to properly install it?

I'm trying really hard not to be tempted to go get a different monitor just because of this wide gamut color stuff. I like the additional ports for the size and even though this may cause more input lag, it's barely noticeable at least over DP. I've played games all of my life and really this shouldn't be an issue for anybody unless maybe you play professionally. (I'll have to try with the other ports maybe).

Anyways, if the color is fixable with settings and software, then I'll keep it, but if it will inevitably always be an issue because it's wide gamut and there's no sRGB emulation, then I might jump for the Monoprice 30" IPS and just fork over more $$.

Thanks in advance!
post #934 of 1116
Quote:
Originally Posted by tatsu View Post

Anyways, if the color is fixable with settings and software, then I'll keep it, but if it will inevitably always be an issue because it's wide gamut and there's no sRGB emulation, then I might jump for the Monoprice 30" IPS and just fork over more $$.
Unfortunately the Monoprice 30" is more than likely wide gamut also. It uses the same panel as Dell and HP and advertises 1.07 billion colors, so I don't see how it couldn't be. In my mind there is absolutely zero benefit to wide gamut, unless you are a one man shop doing output on high-end printers, or maybe working for a design/print/publishing company with an IT staff that understands and maintains the whole thing. I do graphic work for a living, I use half a dozen different systems, share files with dozens of other people - there is no way aRGB color profiles could be properly mantained through all that.

One thing that helped on my 30" HP - in the Radeon/CCC panel, was checking the setting for "use EDID" under color temp. It seems to knock back the hot primaries without killing saturation in the midtones. I don't think nVidia has an equivalent (but the digital vibrance thing is interesting.) I don't do any color-critical work on it, so I can't say how well it holds up over the whole spectrum. Beyond that, I really doubt you are going to get there only in software. I'm not even sure how much a hardware calibrator would help - I think the software has to play along too to recognize the profile. My guess is the people who actually use wide gamut professionally spend 98% of their time in Photoshop and just deal with whacked out colors in everything else.

On the Mac side, the only thing I've found that kind of works, is OSX seems to apply calibration for the main display across all connected displays. So if you have the wide gamut display set up as secondary, you can kind of trick it into displaying normal colors. (I would be really curious if this works for you - set the MBP as primary and see if it makes a difference - it has been awhile since I played with it.)

If you want an sRGB panel with DisplayPort, I don't think there are any 'cheap" options right now. Korean eBay models with DP are ~$500. The glossy Auria had a really good thing going, such a bummer they switched.
Edited by austinpike - 3/23/13 at 2:13pm
post #935 of 1116
Quote:
Originally Posted by austinpike View Post

One thing that helped on my 30" HP - in the Radeon/CCC panel, was checking the setting for "use EDID" under color temp. It seems to knock back the hot primaries without killing saturation in the midtones. I don't think nVidia has an equivalent (but the digital vibrance thing is interesting.) I don't do any color-critical work on it, so I can't say how well it holds up over the whole spectrum. Beyond that, I really doubt you are going to get there only in software. I'm not even sure how much a hardware calibrator would help - I think the software has to play along too to recognize the profile. My guess is the people who actually use wide gamut professionally spend 98% of their time in Photoshop and just deal with whacked out colors in everything else.

On the Mac side, the only thing I've found that kind of works, is OSX seems to apply calibration for the main display across all connected displays. So if you have the wide gamut display set up as secondary, you can kind of trick it into displaying normal colors. (I would be really curious if this works for you - set the MBP as primary and see if it makes a difference - it has been awhile since I played with it.)

If you want an sRGB panel with DisplayPort, I don't think there are any 'cheap" options right now. Korean eBay models with DP are ~$500. The glossy Auria had a really good thing going, such a bummer they switched.

Thanks for the help here. I'll look into the EDID thing and see if I can emulate something similar with nVidia. I've noticed the mid-tones become less saturated using the Digital Vibrance fix though it fixes the hot primaries, so if this EDID fix works, then things could be good. And I'll let you know about the MBP stuff.

I'm going to do a side-by-side comparison with my brother's Dell and see how close I can get to the colors since his seems to be calibrated pretty well and the colors look very similar to my Retina screen standalone. I think it's an older model though.

Now I'm thinking about just returning or selling Auria and just holding out until the next display from Apple comes out or maybe something mid-year things will change and these manufactures will start making something right. But if everyone is moving to wide gamut, then how is everyone going to have to start dealing with the colors then? Will all of these monitors have to do some sRGB emulation?
post #936 of 1116
I have some more news about this monitor. Against my will, my coworker purchased this monitor and I helped him take off the anti-glare filter. The results are really stunning. Everything looks 100 times sharper and the clarity is stunning compared to before the filter was removed.

IMO everyone should be removing this, truly horrendous, anti-glare filter. You will be shocked at the difference.
post #937 of 1116
what was your procedure to remove it?
post #938 of 1116
Just search the thread. Be careful though not to lift the polarize. There are two layers over the LCD the polarize and the anti-glare filter on top. Dont lift the polarize because it looks like its part of the anti-glare filter. Anti-glare filter comes off easy. You dont need to do the paper towel and water soaking since the filter is water proof anyway. I dont know who came up with that nonsense. We didnt soak it at all. Just slowly pull it off.
post #939 of 1116
Also note, I still do not recommend this monitor unless you can get it for $300 or less since it uses panels that LG has rejected due to major contrast shifts across them.. But if you already bought it then taking off the filter is a must.
post #940 of 1116


**** this, now what?

there's 2 layers there and they're both white
Reactor Number 4
(14 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Phenom II 940BE Deneb Gigabyte GA-MA790FX-UD5P HIS Radeon HD7950 iceqx2 GSkill DDR2 2x2GB 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
Spinpoint F3 1TB Raid0 LG Sata DVD Windows 7 Home Premium Auria EQ276W 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Microsoft Antec TPQ-1000 Cooler Master HAF 932 Razer Diamondback (red) 
Mouse PadAudio
Desk Razer Barracuda AC-1 and HD280 pros 
  hide details  
Reply
Reactor Number 4
(14 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Phenom II 940BE Deneb Gigabyte GA-MA790FX-UD5P HIS Radeon HD7950 iceqx2 GSkill DDR2 2x2GB 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
Spinpoint F3 1TB Raid0 LG Sata DVD Windows 7 Home Premium Auria EQ276W 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Microsoft Antec TPQ-1000 Cooler Master HAF 932 Razer Diamondback (red) 
Mouse PadAudio
Desk Razer Barracuda AC-1 and HD280 pros 
  hide details  
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Monitors and Displays
Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Monitors and Displays › Microcenter now carrying the 27" 2560x1440 Korean IPS monitors