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New to TEC, any TEC product for sale?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
wanna get rid of my H80, any better recommandations except H100? any TEC products? Thanks a lot.
post #2 of 7
curious as well
post #3 of 7
TECs are not something you just buy and plug in....


You have to consider load vs heat dump, variable voltage PSU, insulation, etc.
Once again...
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Once again...
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post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 
wrong post, sry
Edited by chaopinzhiwang - 5/29/12 at 12:17pm
post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckieHo View Post

TECs are not something you just buy and plug in....
You have to consider load vs heat dump, variable voltage PSU, insulation, etc.
can you be kindness enough to tell me more about TEC? what are the components of an entire TEC system? or can you refer to any good articles that i can read about? Thanks
post #6 of 7
TECs are solid state heat pumps. They move heat from one side to the other, creating a relative cold side on the side where the heat was removed, and a relative hot side where the heat was moved to.

There is something called Qmax which is how much Wattage a TEC can move. And then there is Consumption, which is how many watts it takes to move the amount of Qmax. Qmax is usually close the same as consumption.

To figure out how much heat is on the hot side, you must Take the load (in watts) then take the consumption (in watts) add them together, and that is how much heat your cooling system must remove.

CPU: 77W
TEC Qmax: 150W
TEC Consumption: 144W
Heat to be removed by watercooling: 77W + 144W = 221W

TECs work best when cooled with a watercooling system and run at 45-65% or so of their maximum voltage. If you build a cooler with a 30V tec, you'll want to run that around 20 - 22V to reach that butter-zone of Watts Used vs Watts Moved. This is to improve efficiency.

The temperature difference between the Hot side and the cold side is called the Delta. As you decrease voltage that delta decreases, but the Qmax vs Consumption improves. It is simply a balancing act.

There are 2 types of coolers when it comes to TECs, Direct Die, and Liquid Chillers:

Liquid Chillers cool liquid that flows through a waterblock to cool you CPU. It required 2 Loops, a Hot and a Cold loop. The Cold loop goes across the cold side of the TEC, then across your CPU, through a res/pump and repeats endlessly. The hot loop goes from Radiators to your Res, to your pump to your TEC Hot Side, back to radiator to repeat endlessly. Requires 2 pumps. Chillers can remove loads of heat, depending how many you have.

Direct Die has a single loop that cools the hot side of the TEC, the TEC is cooling a piece of metal, which is in contact directly with your CPU. It works like a replacement waterblock for your CPU. Direct Die is limited to the space around your CPU.

I think this explains TECs in a nut shell. If you have anymore questions, more specific ones I would hope, let me know biggrin.gif

EDIT:

There are TONS more aspects which play a role in cooling a processor. Stuff like thermal resistance, clamping pressure, cascading TECs. I just posted on the big ones. Probably forgot something though.
Edited by Krow - 5/30/12 at 11:29am
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Whitey!
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post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Krow View Post

TECs are solid state heat pumps. They move heat from one side to the other, creating a relative cold side on the side where the heat was removed, and a relative hot side where the heat was moved to.
There is something called Qmax which is how much Wattage a TEC can move. And then there is Consumption, which is how many watts it takes to move the amount of Qmax. Qmax is usually close the same as consumption.
To figure out how much heat is on the hot side, you must Take the load (in watts) then take the consumption (in watts) add them together, and that is how much heat your cooling system must remove.
CPU: 77W
TEC Qmax: 150W
TEC Consumption: 144W
Heat to be removed by watercooling: 77W + 144W = 221W
TECs work best when cooled with a watercooling system and run at 45-65% or so of their maximum voltage. If you build a cooler with a 30V tec, you'll want to run that around 20 - 22V to reach that butter-zone of Watts Used vs Watts Moved. This is to improve efficiency.
The temperature difference between the Hot side and the cold side is called the Delta. As you decrease voltage that delta decreases, but the Qmax vs Consumption improves. It is simply a balancing act.
There are 2 types of coolers when it comes to TECs, Direct Die, and Liquid Chillers:
Liquid Chillers cool liquid that flows through a waterblock to cool you CPU. It required 2 Loops, a Hot and a Cold loop. The Cold loop goes across the cold side of the TEC, then across your CPU, through a res/pump and repeats endlessly. The hot loop goes from Radiators to your Res, to your pump to your Direct Die TEC Waterblock, back to radiator to repeat endlessly. Requires 2 pumps. Chillers can remove loads of power, depending how many you have.
Direct Die has a single loop that cools the hot side of the TEC, the TEC is cooling a piece of metal, which is in contact directly with your CPU. It works like a replacement waterblock for your CPU. Direct Die is limited to the space around your CPU.
I think this explains TECs in a nut shell. If you have anymore questions, more specific ones I would hope, let me know biggrin.gif
EDIT:
There are TONS more aspects which play a role in cooling a processor. Stuff like thermal resistance, clamping pressure, cascading TECs. I just posted on the big ones. Probably forgot something though.
Thank you so much. I am still digesting what you said...its complicated to me. I will do more research based on what you said, we will keep in touch! thanks again! thumb.gifsmile.gif
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