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Gelid Icy Installation on Zotac GTX 560 Ti 448's

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
WARNING: PICTURE HEAVY!

A couple weeks ago I had picked up a pair of Zotac GTX 560 Ti 448s to replace a pair of MSI Twin Frozr GTX 560 Ti's.

IMG_1339.jpg

You might not think it to be much of an upgrade, but let me tell you, it was. After overclocking the 448's to 900core/2100mem, they blaze through everything I throw at them, keeping me locked at 60fps in BF3 with everything cranked at 1920x1080 - just what I was hoping for. They also netted me a GPU score of 12,080 in 3dmark11. Ridiculous. As ridiculous were the temperatures, however.

In BF3, I was cruising around at about 85C on the top card, 75C on the bottom card. These temps are a little higher than I like, and that was with the fan speed at 85% using MSI afterburner. The sound was literally ear-piercing. The stock fans just weren't cutting it.

I headed to newegg and this form to see what the options were to replace the stock cooler. I had found several threads about using the Gelid Icy Vision Rev 2 cooler on almost every current video card, but I saw nothing about using them on the Zotac GTX 560 Ti 448, or even just a plain jane 448. I happened across the Gelid in open-box form on newegg for $31.99 each and jumped on 2 of them as fast as I could. Then I started praying they would fit.

Well, to make a long story short, they fit, but not without a little tweaking. Nothing drastic, just be ready to bust out the dremel and a pair of pliers. The following picture shows the necessary removal of the end of the copper heatpipe to allow the cooler to mate properly to the gpu. The removal is necessary with the Zotac since it uses stacked DVI ports.

IMG_1601.jpg

The removal of the stock heatsink/fan assembly is very easy. Flip the card over to the backside and unscrew about 16 screws or so. Essentially, if you see a screw, unscrew it. Then, flip the card onto one of the long side and find the 3 screws on that side that are screwed into the plastic cover and unscrew them. Do the same for the other side. At this point, the stock cooler wiggles off with a careful twist.

Pictures of a single 448 with the Gelid's included heatsinks installed:

IMG_1591.jpg

IMG_1613.jpg

The configuration of standoffs/screws that I used:

IMG_1594.jpg

The workbench:

IMG_1598.jpg

1 installed, another waiting:

IMG_1607.jpg

Ready to be slapped on!

IMG_1610.jpg

A few shots showing the cooler installed on the card. Note the trimmed heatpipe to accomodate for the stacked DVI ports. There is roughly a 1/8" clearance between the cooler and the stack.

IMG_1603.jpg

IMG_1604.jpg

IMG_1605.jpg

The following is a closeup of the clearance between the heatpipe and the stack and also the vram heatsinks and the heatpipes at the mating surface of the gpu after cooler installation.

IMG_1606.jpg

Ready to rock and roll:

IMG_1616.jpg

This picture shows just how close the two cards are after being installed. Since the fans are not PWM, I cannot control them with afterburner. This results in the top card running 25C hotter than the bottom currently because it's pulled heat directly off the bottom card. I have ordered a FAN MATER 2 controller for the top card to bring the fanspeed up to accomodate for this.

IMG_1621.jpg

IMG_1623.jpg



Overall, I am pleased thus far. After I get the fan controller installed I will report back with my true findings. Currently, I am sitting at 80C on the top card and down to 55C on the bottom card while overclocked and fragging in a 75F room in Battlefield 3.
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 3930k Asus P9X79 Pro 3-way GTX 780 SLI 16GB G.Skill Ares 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingOS
256GB Crucial M4 WD Black Corsair H80 Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit 
MonitorMonitorKeyboardPower
Acer HN274H 27" 120hz ASUS VE278Q 27" Saitek Eclipse OCZ ZX1000 
CaseMouseMouse PadAudio
HAF 932 Advanced MX510 QcK+ Logitech z5300e 
Audio
Sennheiser HD555 
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CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 3930k Asus P9X79 Pro 3-way GTX 780 SLI 16GB G.Skill Ares 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingOS
256GB Crucial M4 WD Black Corsair H80 Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit 
MonitorMonitorKeyboardPower
Acer HN274H 27" 120hz ASUS VE278Q 27" Saitek Eclipse OCZ ZX1000 
CaseMouseMouse PadAudio
HAF 932 Advanced MX510 QcK+ Logitech z5300e 
Audio
Sennheiser HD555 
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post #2 of 7
Sweet setup bro! Thats a great little cooler, I had one installed on a GTX 480 a long time ago and if it can cool that heat monster then I know it can cool your cards.
post #3 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by plasmeh View Post


Well, to make a long story short, they fit, but not without a little tweaking. Nothing drastic, just be ready to bust out the dremel and a pair of pliers. The following picture shows the necessary removal of the end of the copper heatpipe to allow the cooler to mate properly to the gpu. The removal is necessary with the Zotac since it uses stacked DVI ports.
IMG_1601.jpg
.

You ruined the heat pipe when you cut the end off, and it will seriously hinder it's ability to cool the card. I've seen people have to bend them and mash them to get them to fit properly, but cutting the end off lets the liquid out, and just plain doesn't make any sense.
post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 
So the fact that I'm seeing a 20C drop means nothing to you. There are still 4 fully functional heatpipes in contact with the gpu and my temps are down 20C from the stocker cooler. I have installed the fan controller mentioned in my post and it brought the top card down 15C. I don't see how it is "seriously hinder"ing the ability to cool the cards.
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 3930k Asus P9X79 Pro 3-way GTX 780 SLI 16GB G.Skill Ares 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingOS
256GB Crucial M4 WD Black Corsair H80 Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit 
MonitorMonitorKeyboardPower
Acer HN274H 27" 120hz ASUS VE278Q 27" Saitek Eclipse OCZ ZX1000 
CaseMouseMouse PadAudio
HAF 932 Advanced MX510 QcK+ Logitech z5300e 
Audio
Sennheiser HD555 
  hide details  
Reply
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 3930k Asus P9X79 Pro 3-way GTX 780 SLI 16GB G.Skill Ares 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingOS
256GB Crucial M4 WD Black Corsair H80 Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit 
MonitorMonitorKeyboardPower
Acer HN274H 27" 120hz ASUS VE278Q 27" Saitek Eclipse OCZ ZX1000 
CaseMouseMouse PadAudio
HAF 932 Advanced MX510 QcK+ Logitech z5300e 
Audio
Sennheiser HD555 
  hide details  
Reply
post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by plasmeh View Post

So the fact that I'm seeing a 20C drop means nothing to you.
I would have found a different cooling solution if it meant destroying one of the heat pipes to make it fit. I wouldn't even consider it. If you're happy with it though that's all that matters.
post #6 of 7
Well the problem is there isnt rly another sollution for this gpu.
I been looking for a cooling sollution for this card as well, and havnt found a good one yet.
I am wondering if its possible too mod the dvi connections a bit.
post #7 of 7
i Know this may sound stupid but what about cutting a couple of fins off and bending the heatpipe.
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