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List of 120hz monitors. - Page 2

post #11 of 13
This question keeps popping up, which monitors are overclockable to 120Hz, which monitors are LightBoost, old vs new models, etc. I'm posting a list here:

Overclockable 120Hz Monitors
- QNIX QX2710 Evolution 2 ...... 27″ 2560×1440 ~90Hz – 130Hz
- X-Star DP2710 ...... 27″ 2560×1440 ~90Hz – 130Hz
- Overlord Tempest X270OC ...... 27″ 2560×1440 ~90Hz – 130Hz
- Overlord PCB Upgrade ...... 27″ 2560×1440 ~90Hz – 130Hz
- Catleap 2B ...... 27″ 2560×1440 ~120Hz
- Certain HDTV televisions .... HDTV Refresh Overclocking HOWTO: 120Hz television as a monitor

LightBoost 120Hz Monitors
has the LightBoost strobe backlight that can eliminate motion blur, see LightBoost HOWTO
- ASUS VG248QE ...... 24″ 1920×1080 144Hz
- ASUS VG278H ...... 24″ 1920×1080 120Hz
- ASUS VG278HE ...... 27″ 1920×1080 144Hz
- BENQ XL2411T 24″ ...... 1920×1080 144Hz
- BENQ XL2420T 24″ ...... 1920×1080 120Hz
- BENQ XL2420TX ...... 24″ 1920×1080 120Hz
- BENQ XL2420TE ...... 24″ 1920×1080 144Hz
- BENQ XL2720T ...... 27″ 1920×1080 120Hz
- ACER HN274HB bmiiid ...... 27″ 1920×1080 120Hz

Samsung 120Hz Monitors
has a strobe backlight that can eliminate motion blur, see Samsung Zero Motion Blur HOWTO
- Samsung S23A700D ...... 23″ 1920×1080 120Hz
- Samsung S23A750D ...... 23″ 1920×1080 120Hz
- Samsung S23A950D ...... 23″ 1920×1080 120Hz
- Samsung S27A700D ...... 27″ 1920×1080 120Hz
- Samsung S27A750D ...... 27″ 1920×1080 120Hz
- Samsung S27A950D ...... 27″ 1920×1080 120Hz

Other/Older 120Hz Monitors
- ASUS VG236H ...... 23″ 1920×1080 120Hz
- ASUS VG236HE ...... 23″ 1920×1080 120Hz
- AOC g2460PQU ...... 24″ 1920×1080 144Hz
- BENQ XL2410T ...... 24″ 1920×1080 120Hz
- ACER GN245HQ, GD245HQ ...... 24″ 1920×1080 120Hz
- ACER GD235HZ ...... 23″ 1920×1080 120Hz
- ACER HN274H bmiiid ...... 27″ 1920×1080 120Hz
- Iiyama Prolite G2773HS ...... 27″ 1920×1080 120Hz
- Alienware AW2310 ...... 23″ 1920×1080 120Hz
- Planar SA2311W ...... 23″ 1920×1080 120Hz
- LG W2363D-PF ...... 23″ 1920×1080 120Hz
- Viewsonic VX2265wm, VX2268wm ...... 22″ 1680×1050 120Hz
- Samsung 2233rz ...... 22″ 1680×1050 120Hz
- Viewsonic V3D245 ...... 24″ 1920×1080 120Hz

(List taken from 120Hz monitors)
Edited by mdrejhon - 8/7/13 at 6:11am
post #12 of 13
I guess I'd have to question the true over clock ability of the QNIX QX2710 Evolution 2 at 120 Hz if kept over clocked all the time.

If you listen to a very reputable reviewer MenacingTuba from OCN video review of the Qnix QX2710 you learn the negative aspects of over clocking this monitor when not gaming or watching movies.

The review covers the negative over clocking issue which is discussed at 23:03 mins into this video:

Over clocked to 120 Hz Image retention occurs when keeping static images for long periods of time. After setting the Qnix back to default 60 Hz for a few hours the image retention would disappear. It's strongly recommended to keep it at default 60 Hz to avoid permanent burn in and avoid image retention when not gaming or watching movies.

So there are some negative aspects in over clocking this 2560x1440p monitor that bears some thought into mind when doing so when not gaming or watching movies. It does raise question about the over clock ability of refresh rate when compared to True 120 Hz TN panels that do not suffer from these issues when kept at 120 Hz all the time.

     
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post #13 of 13
Certainly very good information. I did quote a range of "90Hz-130Hz" as I've heard of outliers. Some don't even do well even at 90Hz, but at least those are a minority. A minor disclaimer may need to be added, and people can use utilities (e.g. Entechtaiwan MultiRes) to do a quick switch back to 60Hz.

The overclockability aspects affects different parts of the chain:
-- The input electronics
-- The panel itself
The QNIX Q2710 is overclocked at the panel level too, which creates side effects like the image retention. Also, retention occurs far less if you greatly reduce the contrast range so that darkest blacks / brightest whites are avoided (but that often defeats the purpose of getting IPS / PLS, too) because those are the color extremes that get image retention (e.g. maximum LCD pixel-driving voltage).

For other displays, overclocking HDTV's does not affect image retention. This is because the panels themselves were designed to refresh at 120Hz anyway because of interpolation (e.g. Motionflow); so for certain displays, the only thing that is being overclocked is the electronics of the HDTV -- getting true native 120Hz to the panel, without interpolation. (It is hit or miss, but increasing numbers of 2012 and 2013 HDTV's have become more friendly to 120Hz)
Edited by mdrejhon - 7/11/13 at 11:06am
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