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[Build Log] First Mod. '~Hydro-Flame~' HAF-932 **FINAL PICS** - Page 10

post #91 of 126
Thread Starter 
Got a few things in the mail today! biggrin.gif

Sleeving tool(s) from the man himself. Lutro0!!


matching RAM: any thoughts on this one? Anyone have this kind? Figured with the high airflow and red heatsinks, it would stay cool but look the best.


SSD:


Last but not least:


not really relevant, but thought I'd throw in the monitor pic too. Wanted one on the cheaper end of the spectrum but high frame rates for FPS fun.
post #92 of 126
Thread Starter 
Tried experimenting with sleeving on another fan cable splitter and it took me all evening without completion. I'm definitely gonna need more heatshrink mad.gif

Using the sleeving tool from Lutro0, it looks only a little cleaner (left), but I expect for it to have a bigger effect on the powersupply than on 3 pin fan cables.


Edited by Roman736 - 9/26/12 at 8:57pm
post #93 of 126
Corsair Vengeance RAM is awesome. They really don't get that hot to start out, but I love mine.
Quote:
1. I would LOVE to have the CPU block PULSE like a heartbeat in the case. How would I go about doing this?? Software? Circuit soldering?? (bonus: if I could increase the rate of pulsation with processor work load or temperature i would be in heaven)

Well I don't know how to sync the light with CPU load (that would take some pre-written software), but as for just a pulsating beat, you can use a capacitor if you are handy in electronics. Basically, the capacitor is in line with the light and as electricity enters the capacitor, the capacitor charges but doesn't let any electricity through (OFF state). When the capacitor fills, the electricity is then released causing the LED to turn on (ON state). This repeats over and over, causing a flashing effect. You can alter the speed of the light blinking; slower blinking would require a larger capacitor, faster would be a smaller capacitor.

If you are looking for a more "pulsating" effect, that may require some software or independent module to control the voltage. You'll have to do some research.
post #94 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roman736 View Post

1. I would LOVE to have the CPU block PULSE like a heartbeat in the case. How would I go about doing this?? Software? Circuit soldering?? (bonus: if I could increase the rate of pulsation with processor work load or temperature i would be in heaven)[/SIZE]

My thought would be to hook the led's up to one of the PWM headers on your motherboard. I don't know what the voltage coming from the PWM line is, but I don't believe it's enough to power led's, or rather, you probably shouldn't. So the better way to do it it would be to hook the pwm line up to a simple transistor (which acts as a switch). Then have the main power line (probably from a molex) go through the transistor. So when the PWM wave is high, the transistor allows current through to the leds, when the wave is low, it shuts them off.

You can read this if you don't understand the circuit: http://www.robotroom.com/PWM4.html
You can ignore the picture at the top of the page because the motherboard is creating the PWM for you.

For modulating the pulse, you *could* use something like Speed Fan to link it with your system temps, but I'm thinking the pulse may be too fast for you to see. More than likely, you will have to google for software to do this.
post #95 of 126
Subbed
Blue Master
(16 items)
 
Wife's Pc
(12 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i5 6600k Asus Z170 Ranger evga 980 TI Superclocked CORSAIR Vengeance LPX 32GB 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 250 GB SSD and 1.5 TB x 2 Asus Blu Ray Burner Corsair H80i Windows 10 Pro 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
Dell 24 LED Logitech G15 Corsair AX 1200i Cooler Master Master Case 5 Pro 
MouseMouse PadAudio
Logitech G700 Razer Goliathus Medium Creative Labs Sound Blaster X-FI Titanium Champ... 
CPUMotherboardRAMHard Drive
Intel Core i5 Process 3750k  Asrock H77M-ITX G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 8GB Samsung Electronics 840 EVO-Series 120GB SSD 
Optical DriveOSMonitorMonitor
ASUS 24X DVD Burner Windows 7 Samsung S23C350H Samsung S23C350H 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Logitech Wireless Wave Mk550 Cooler Master Silent Pro Gold 800W Bitfenix Prodigy Logitech Wireless Wave Mk550 
  hide details  
Reply
Blue Master
(16 items)
 
Wife's Pc
(12 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i5 6600k Asus Z170 Ranger evga 980 TI Superclocked CORSAIR Vengeance LPX 32GB 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 250 GB SSD and 1.5 TB x 2 Asus Blu Ray Burner Corsair H80i Windows 10 Pro 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
Dell 24 LED Logitech G15 Corsair AX 1200i Cooler Master Master Case 5 Pro 
MouseMouse PadAudio
Logitech G700 Razer Goliathus Medium Creative Labs Sound Blaster X-FI Titanium Champ... 
CPUMotherboardRAMHard Drive
Intel Core i5 Process 3750k  Asrock H77M-ITX G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 8GB Samsung Electronics 840 EVO-Series 120GB SSD 
Optical DriveOSMonitorMonitor
ASUS 24X DVD Burner Windows 7 Samsung S23C350H Samsung S23C350H 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Logitech Wireless Wave Mk550 Cooler Master Silent Pro Gold 800W Bitfenix Prodigy Logitech Wireless Wave Mk550 
  hide details  
Reply
post #96 of 126
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichieSams View Post

My thought would be to hook the led's up to one of the PWM headers on your motherboard. I don't know what the voltage coming from the PWM line is, but I don't believe it's enough to power led's, or rather, you probably shouldn't. So the better way to do it it would be to hook the pwm line up to a simple transistor (which acts as a switch). Then have the main power line (probably from a molex) go through the transistor. So when the PWM wave is high, the transistor allows current through to the leds, when the wave is low, it shuts them off.
You can read this if you don't understand the circuit: http://www.robotroom.com/PWM4.html
You can ignore the picture at the top of the page because the motherboard is creating the PWM for you.
For modulating the pulse, you *could* use something like Speed Fan to link it with your system temps, but I'm thinking the pulse may be too fast for you to see. More than likely, you will have to google for software to do this.

I just got off a 24h call and don't understand what you're saying whatsoever, but I WILL research all of this when I get a chance. Promise.
Quote:
Originally Posted by WebsterXC View Post

Corsair Vengeance RAM is awesome. They really don't get that hot to start out, but I love mine.
Well I don't know how to sync the light with CPU load (that would take some pre-written software), but as for just a pulsating beat, you can use a capacitor if you are handy in electronics. Basically, the capacitor is in line with the light and as electricity enters the capacitor, the capacitor charges but doesn't let any electricity through (OFF state). When the capacitor fills, the electricity is then released causing the LED to turn on (ON state). This repeats over and over, causing a flashing effect. You can alter the speed of the light blinking; slower blinking would require a larger capacitor, faster would be a smaller capacitor.
If you are looking for a more "pulsating" effect, that may require some software or independent module to control the voltage. You'll have to do some research.

I appreciate the advice about this. RichieSams advice too.
After looking into it, I think it's too much to handle. There have been others attempting it on these very forums yet none have succeeded. I would have to learn circuitry (if that's even what it's called), buy the tools and find a way to develop the software, all at a time when it takes me 5 hours to sleeve a small cable splitter.

I'm drawing the line and saving the idea for another time.




But to end this post on a high note, I will show what came in the mail yesterday while I was working:












Edited by Roman736 - 9/28/12 at 5:22am
post #97 of 126
nice build so far man looks clean biggrin.gif
post #98 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roman736 View Post


Sexy.
post #99 of 126
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichieSams View Post

Sexy.

and book smart!






Had to post a pic of that vengeance RAM. It just looks so good. And them sticks are huge!!


Edited by Roman736 - 9/28/12 at 12:02pm
post #100 of 126
Thread Starter 
oh man I hope I didnt screw up my MoBo from day 1... I tried using M4 screws, since the instructions said to use "screws" without specifying which one. Initially they dug into the board a bit along the edges of the screw hole. I didn't realize they weren't the right size before enlarging the cases holes beyond repair.

I really really hope I didn't hit a circuit and lose $350 out of thin air! frown.gif




These clamps couldn't look any better, though.


Edited by Roman736 - 9/28/12 at 3:28pm
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Overclock.net › Forums › Case Mods & Cases › Builds & Case Mods › Case Mods › Case Mod Work Logs › [Build Log] First Mod. '~Hydro-Flame~' HAF-932 **FINAL PICS**